Updated Information - Courses

Updates since Spring 2009 are in red

AAS Asian and Asian American Studies

AAS 328-K Race and Comedy in Asian America

This comparative ethnic American cultures course examines how contemporary American comedians, fiction writers, visual artists, independent filmmakers, feminist and transgendered comics deploy the language of comedy to invoke serious social matters in contemporary American life such as racism, immigration, homophobia, class biases against the poor and the undocumented, misogyny, war and other burning issues of the day. We will explore how the ends of comedy are more than laughter and how comedy confronts political issues that are constitutive of and threatening to the U.S. body politic.

Prerequisite: 100-level course in AAS, AMR, or AST

3 credits

AAS 366-G Feminine Spirituality

The role and destiny of human beings as envisaged by the world's great traditions, especially the Chinese and the Islamic. The course focuses on the concept of femininity as a principle in the realms of theology, metaphysics, cosmology, and spiritual psychology; and the theoretical and practical applications of the feminine principle to the place of both men and women in society. Topics include feminine and masculine as metaphysical and cosmological principles; woman and religious law; woman's role in symbolism, mythology, and literature; and the feminine aspects of the self that both women and men need to develop on the path of achieving spiritual perfection. Previously offered as RLS 426, this course is now offered as RLS 366. Not for credit in addition to the former RLS 426. This course is offered as both AAS 366 and RLS 366.

Prerequisite: any 200-level or higher RLS course

3 credits

AAS 387-J Islam and Confucianism

The goal of this course is to compare the basic teachings of Islam and Confucianism concerning the correct way to achieve true human status.  Special stress will be placed on books that Muslim scholars wrote in Chinese beginning in the seventeenth century.  These books employed Neo-Confucian language to introduce Chinese Muslims to their own theology, cosmology, and spiritual psychology, thus providing a rare pre-modern example of inter-religious dialogue. This course is offered as both AAS 387 and RLS 387.

Prerequisite: AAS 260 or RLS 260 or AAS 280 or RLS 280; U3 or U4 standing

AFS Africana Studies/Social and Behavioral Sciences

AFS 355-J Ancient African Civilizations

The archaeology of Africa's later prehistoric and historic periods offers exciting contributions to global debates on the origins of agriculture and civilization. Covering the last 20,000 years, this course begins by examining the economic underpinnings of Africa's complex societies: intensive hunting and gathering, animal domestication, and early farming. Detailed case studies of six ancient civilizations (Egypt, Kerma, Aksum, Jenne, Swahili, and Great Zimbabwe) then demonstrate distinct processes of prehistoric social change in different parts of Africa. The course concludes by discussing African archaeological heritage conservation, research, and public education. This course is offered as both AFS 355 and ANT 355.

Prerequisite: One 100-level course in AFS or ANT; U3 or U4 status

3 credits

ANT Anthropology, Cultural and Archaeology

ANT 260-K How We Eat

This course explores how people's food habits are shaped not only by their biological needs, but also by the economic, political, ecological, and social worlds in which they live. The breadth of anthropology (biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and archaeology) is brought to bear on issues including the economic and political underpinnings of American as well as other food cultures; the relationship between food habits and health (both over-and under-eating); the environmental impacts of various methods of food production; the relationship between food and social status;  gendered food production as well as food consumption; food¿s role in religion; ethical eating; the limits of current knowledge (e.g., changing dietary recommendations); and the socioeconomic pressures that keep individuals eating according to cultural norms. The class discusses foodways in a variety of present and past cultures, but the emphasis is on modern American food culture and the cultural, economic, ecological, and political realities that shape it. Students will explore how these realities affect their own lives and eating habits.

3 credits

ANT 296-I Anthropology of the European Mediterranean

This course explores the societies and cultures of the southern European countries with emphasis placed on rural/agrarian adaptations, gender relations, ritual, religion and folklore, social stratification and social class, community organization, and rural-urban distinctions. Students will read case studies from Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Greece, as well as background material on "The Mediterranean" as a social and cultural construct. The monographs for this course cover mainly the post-War period, from the 1950s and up to the present, but a brief time is spent on  the historical background from classical antiquity to the modern period. Not for credit in addition to ANT 396 with the topic 'The Mediterranean.'

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 355-J Ancient African Civilizations

The archaeology of Africa's later prehistoric and historic periods offers exciting contributions to global debates on the origins of agriculture and civilization. Covering the last 20,000 years, this course begins by examining the economic underpinnings of Africa's complex societies: intensive hunting and gathering, animal domestication, and early farming. Detailed case studies of six ancient civilizations (Egypt, Kerma, Aksum, Jenne, Swahili, and Great Zimbabwe) then demonstrate distinct processes of prehistoric social change in different parts of Africa. The course concludes by discussing African archaeological heritage conservation, research, and public education. This course is offered as both AFS 355 and ANT 355.

Prerequisite: One 100-level course in AFS or ANT; U3 or U4 status

3 credits

ANT 363-F Approaches in Archaeology

A survey of archaeological thought from early antiquarianism through the culture history, processual, and post-processual approaches to the investigation and analysis of past societies. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which changes in archaeological theory reflected changes in ideas within the sister fields of sociology, cultural anthropology and geography. Other topics discussed include ethnographic analogy, systems theory, site formation processes and spatial analysis.

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 368 Archaeology of Human Origins

A survey of the archaeological evidence for behavioral variability and adaptation by early humans during the course of the Pliocene, and Early-Middle Pleistocene epochs (2.7-0.1 million years ago). Topics include early stone tool use, origins of hunting, early fire use, adaptations to glacial climates, behavioral differences among hominins living in Africa, Europe, and Asia.

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 369 Paleolithic Archaeology

A survey of archaeological evidence human behavioral evolution during the Paleolithic Period, ca. 2.5 million to 10,000 years ago. This course examines early human behavior from anthropological and ecological perspectives. Major issues to be examined the diet of early African hominins, stone tool industries, dispersals out of Africa and into Eurasia, adaptations to glacial climates, behavioral differences between Neandertals and modern humans, the origins of symbolic behavior, and hunter-gatherer precursors to agriculture.

Prerequisite: ANT 104 or ANP 120

3 credits

ANT 373 Archaeology of Human Dispersals

A survey of the archaeological evidence for the dispersal of Homo sapiens during the Late Pleistocene epoch (128,000-13,000 years ago). Topics include African origin of Homo sapiens, dispersals into Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas, large mammal extinctions, origins of art, music, and symbolic behavior, and emergence of hunter-gatherer. Not for credit in addition to ANT 394 topic "Origin of Modern Humans."

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

AMS Applied Math and Statistics

AMS 316 Introduction to Time Series Analysis

Trend and seasonal components of time series models, autoregressive and moving average (ARMA) models, Box-Jenkins methodology, Portmanteau test, unit-root, generalized autoregressive conditionally heteroskedasticity (GARCH) models, exponential GARCH, stochastic volatility models. This course is offered as both AMS 316 and AMS 586.

Prerequisites: AMS 301 and 310 or permission of instructor

Corequisites: MAT 203 or 205 or AMS 261

3 credits

AMS 331 Mathematical Modeling

Investigation of the process of translating real world problems into mathematical models. Six to eight unconnected problems are studied in detail. These are chosen to illustrate various methods of formulation and solution, and generally find their origins in the physical and biological sciences.

Prerequisites: AMS 210 or MAT 211; AMS 310 or 311

3 credits

AMS 421 Statistical Quality Control and Design of Experiments

Online techniques that determine and control the quality of mass-manufactured products on a real-time basis by means of statistical analysis. Offline use and applications of the design-of-experiment and Taguchi methods to optimize a product and a process design. The concept of total quality management. Histograms, tests for normality, variables, and attribute control charts, orthogonal arrays, and signal-to-noise arrays. Z-transform for the evaluation of the percentage of nonconforming parts, tests for special causes. Zbar-R charts, and process capability analysis. Acceptance quality level and lobby-lot inspection. This course offered as both AMS 421 and MEC 421.

Prerequisite: MEC 317

3 credits

ARH Art History

ARH 207 Digital Media: History and Theory

An introduction to historical and theoretical issues in digital media. Following discussion of basic concepts in studying digital media, the course focuses on examining the history of computer technologies, and their theoretical implications and cultural ramifications in the present. This course is offered as ARH 207, CCS 207, and DIA 207.

3 credits

ARH 320-I Art in the Age of Enlightenment

A survey of European art from about 1690 to 1790.  Although lectures usually focus on a single artist at a time, the course as a whole stresses artistic attitudes as well as a progression of styles.  An effort is made to study art in historical and cultural context, especially in the light of the new philosophies of rationalism, empiricism and individualism that developed and led to both industrial and political revolutions.  The three schools covered are the Venetian, English, and French, from the late Baroque and the Rococo styles to the rise of landscape and early Romantic art. Major artists treated are Tiepolo, Canaletto, Watteau, Chardin, Boucher, Fragonard, Hogarth, Gainsborough, Greuze and David.The list of lecture topics will indicate names of major artists.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

3 credits

ARH 341-I Art of the 19th Century

A survey of European art from about 1780 to 1890. Emphasis is on individual artists, artistic attitudes, and progression of style. Art is examined in its historical and cultural contexts. Movements studied include neo­classicism, romanticism, realism, and impressionism.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

Advisory Prerequisites: Two other courses from among D.E.C. categories B, D, and G

3 credits

 ARH 346-I Art and Politics in the Age of Revolution

A survey of European art from about 1790 to 1850, stressing artistic attitudes as well as a progression of styles.  A special effort is made to view art in historical and cultural context.  A principal theme is the development of the modern artistic ideology through ideals such as genius, originality, and the sublime, all of which emerge in the context of a series of political revolutions going from 1789 to 1848.  Conflict between the aesthetic and the political, the personal and the public, the traditional and the modern will be explored.  Major artists treated are: David, Goya, Füssli, Blake, Runge, Friedrich, Constable, Ingres, Géricault, Delacroix, Turner, Courbet. Not for credit in addition to ARH 341.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

Advisory Prerequisite: One or more 300-level ARH courses

3 credits

ARH 347-I Avant-Garde Art: Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism

An examination of the origins of the avant-garde in European painting and its revolutionary developments from Impressionism through Post Impressionism.  The course explores the social, political, and cultural roots of the artists who overturned conservative traditions in favor of modern values and thus established the basis and direction for the art of our time.  Conflicts between the aesthetic and the political, the personal and the public, the traditional and the modern will be explored.  Social relationships, including those of class and gender, are also embedded in works claiming objective naturalism.  Major artists treated are Manet, Degas, Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, Seurat, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Cézanne. Not for credit in addition to ARH 341.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

Advisory Prerequisite: One or more 300-level ARH courses

3 credits

ARS Art, Studio

ARS 205-D Foundations: Idea and Form

An introduction to the basic building blocks for artistic practice and aesthetic analysis. Projects are organized around themes such as line, plane, volume, color, composition, typography, pattern, scale, narrative, performance, light, sound, and monument. These projects, as well as readings, presentations, and discussions, examine the importance of a changing cultural,

environmental, and social context and its impact on meaning and perception in art and visual culture.

3 credits

ARS 324 Intermediate Digital Art: Design

This course focuses on the aesthetic, social, political, and ethical issues at stake in the production of design. The course extends beyond two-dimensional graphic design to include critical approaches to the practice and production of architecture, urbanism, environmental design, social life, and fine art.

Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR 208 or ARS 225

3 credits

BIO Biology

BIO 336-H Conservation Biology

Society and individual lives are increasingly affected by environmental degradation at different scales. From the decline of local fisheries to global climate change, multiple crises threaten the biodiversity and ecosystems that sustain us humans. This course introduces the scientific foundations of conservation biology, along with examples from real-world conservation. The course reviews the biological concepts that underlie conservation including habitat requirements, population dynamics, biogeography, and population genetics. Analysis of case studies on the effects of human activities on biological diversity and ecosystem services will be used to explore the interdisciplinary nature of the practice of conservation. This course will prepare students for careers in environmental sciences and ecology.

Prerequisites: BIO 201

Advisory Prerequisite: BIO 351, BIO 320

3 credits

BME Biomedical Engineering

BME 313 Bioinstrumentation

Basic concepts of biomedical instrumentation and medical devices with a focus on the virtual instrumentation in biomedical engineering using the latest computer technology. Topics include basic sensors in biomedical engineering, biological signal measurement, conditioning, digitizing, and analysis. Advanced applications of LabVIEW, a graphics programming tool for virtual instrumentation. Helps students develop skills to build virtual instrumentation for laboratory research and prototyping medical devices.

Prerequisite: BME 212

Pre- or Corequisite: ESE 271

3 credits

BUS Business Management

BUS 111 Introduction to Business for Non-Business Majors

Introduces students to major business topics that influence today's business practices. Explores contributions over the last century from Henry Ford to Bill Gates, showing how the Industrial Revolution became the Information Revolution. Provides knowledge of how business works and a perspective on its evolution into the next millennium. Integrates both introduction to business and management principles into one course. This course may not be taken for credit in addition to BUS 112.

Prerequisite: Non Business Majors

3 credits

BUS 112 Introduction to Business and Environmental Sustainability

A lecture and applications oriented course that introduces major topics influencing today's business practices relative to environmental sustainability. The evolution of the field over the last century is explored, showing (1) how the Industrial Revolution completely ignored environmental and socially responsible business practices and (2) the somewhat more environmentally friendly atmosphere of the Information Age. The course also examines how businesses work, in view of the global need for sustainable decisions and positioning, and integrates an introduction to business and management principles, public health issues, ethical and socially responsible behavior, and ecological issues. May not be taken for credit in addition to BUS 111.

3 credits

BUS 210 Financial Accounting

Introduction to basic accounting fundamentals. Includes the recording, summarization and adjusting of financial transactions and the basic accounting cycle. Explores the preparation and presentation of the basic financial statements; income statement, retained earnings statement, balance sheet and the statement of cash flows. Includes accounting principles and concepts, asset and liability valuation.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 110 or BUS 111 or BUS 112 or BUS 115

3 credits

BUS 214 Managerial Accounting

A study of cost concepts, theories, and the implementation and evaluation of an accounting system as a source of information for decision making, planning, control, and evaluation of the organization by management. Includes cost-volume-profit analysis, overhead rates, budgeting and variance analysis, statement of cash flows and financial statement ratio analysis.

Prerequisites: Business major or ISE major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 210

3 credits

BUS 215 Introduction to Business Statistics

The application of current statistical methods to problems in the modern business environment. Topics include probability, random variables, sampling techniques, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and regression. Students analyze real data sets using standard statistical software, interpret the output, and write extensively about the results.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor or ISE or CME major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 110 or BUS 111 or BUS 112 or BUS 115; BUS 210; MAT 122

3 credits

BUS 220 Introduction to Decision Sciences

Familiarizes students with a variety of quantitative methods applicable in managing both the service and manufacturing sectors. Basic concepts of quantitative modeling are applied and tested in various examples supporting decision making in business settings. Topics include: optimization via linear, integer, and goal programming; simulation; decision and break-even analysis; and forecasting.

Prerequisites: BUS Major or Minor or MTD or ECO or ISE or CME major; BUS 111 or BUS 112 or BUS 115; BUS 215; MAT 122/125 or higher

3 credits

BUS 294 Principles of Management

An analysis and application of the basic principles of management.  Subjects include management by objectives, supervisory leadership styles, current managerial problems, motivational techniques, organizational problems, communications, planning techniques and management control systems.  We will closely examine case studies that focus on real world problems involving major corporations and closely look at the relationships that led to the issues.

Prerequisites: BUS Major or Minor; BUS 111, 112 or 115

3 credits

BUS 301 Corporate Communications

Examines the role of communications in the corporation using case studies. Topics include: corporate identity, image, reputation, advertising, media relations, employee communications, investor relations, government relations, crisis communications, leadership and corporate responsibility.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 110 or BUS 111 or BUS 112 or BUS 115

3 credits

BUS 310 Intermediate Accounting I

Expands upon the basic financial accounting framework and explores the theoretical and analytical applications of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) in a business environment. Emphasis on asset and liability valuation, external reporting issues dealing with the presentation and interpretation of financial data, and the measurement of operational performance. The student will gain an understanding of financial reporting criteria and the reliance placed upon financial information by management and external users.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 214

3 credits

BUS 311 Federal Income Taxation I

Introduces and explores fundamental income taxation concepts for individuals. Basic concepts in federal income taxation are explored, including gross income, exclusions, adjusted gross income, deductions, exemptions, and credits. Introductory tax concepts including cash and accrual methods, like-kind exchanges, and passive loss rules are covered.  Additionally, students will familiarize themselves with the preparation of various individual income tax forms and schedules.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 214

3 credits

BUS 312 Financial Statement Reporting and Analysis

A review of corporate annual reports and related footnote disclosures from the perspective of the various users of financial statements including management, investors, and creditors. The analysis and assessment of operational business performance, trends, and decision making through the use of financial statements are discussed. Specific review of the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows, financial ratios, budgeting forecasts and analysis.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 214

3 credits

BUS 313 Intermediate Accounting II

A continuation of BUS 310. Covers valuation, measurement, presentation, and analysis of accounting information and financial statements. Includes study of advanced accounting theory and opinions issued by the Accounting Principles Board and its successor, the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Selected topics include revenue recognition, investments, stockholders equity, changes in capital, pensions, leases, accounting for income taxes, accounting changes, error analysis, and related contemporary financial accounting issues.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 311

3 credits

BUS 314 Federal Income Taxation II

Introduces and explores fundamental income taxation concepts for C corporations, S corporations, and partnerships. Further introduces the student to gift and estate taxes, trusts and estates, and the administrative procedures of the Internal Revenue Service. Intro­ductory tax concepts are explored, including corporate organizational structures, corporate organization, dividend issues, liquidation issues, reorganization, partnership organizations, taxation of partnerships, and fiduciary income taxation for estates and gifts.  Additionally, students will familiarize themselves with the preparation of various corporate, partnership and fiduciary income tax forms and schedules.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 311

3 credits

BUS 315 Accounting for the Small Business EntrepreneurI

This course is designed to introduce the student to accounting and other financial concept as that the small business entrepreneur needs to know in order to be successful.  The course will reinforce accounting concepts already introduced in the Financial Accounting course with an emphasis on the small business.  Students will study and utilize QuickBooks and Peachtree accounting software programs.  Other business/financial concerns such as bank reconciliations, payroll preparation, payroll and sales tax compliance, maintenance of installment debt, and utilization of sales and purchase discounts will be reviewed.

Prerequisites:  BUS Major; BUS 210

3 credits

BUS 330 Principles of Finance

Focus on understanding how firms meet and manage their financial objectives. Today's financial environment, the fundamental trade-off between risk and return, the time value of money, and valuing future cash flows will be discussed. Explanation of financial tools and techniques which can be used to help firms maximize value by improving decisions relating to capital. Bond and Stock valuations are introduced.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor or AMS or ECO or ISE or MTD major

Advisory Pre- or Corequisites: BUS 110 or BUS 111 or BUS 112 or BUS 115

3 credits

BUS 331 International Finance

Course will focus on understanding how firms meet and manage their financial objectives. Today's international financial environment, the fundamental trade-off between risk and return, the time value of money, and valuing future cash flows will be discussed.   Explanation of financial tools and techniques, such as international capital budgeting, which can be used to help firms maximize value by improving decisions relating to capital.

Prerequisite: BUS Major; BUS 110 or BUS 112 or BUS 115

3 credits

BUS 334 Advertising and Promotion

Stages and processes involved in developing an integrated marketing communications campaign. A range of marketing activities, including a situation analysis of the company, competition, and business environment, communications audit of a brand and its competitors, budgetary considerations, creative strategy and media planning will be covered. Apply learning to a team project that will walk through various stages of developing an integrated marketing communications campaign.

Prerequisites: Business major; U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 340 Information Systems in Management

An introductory course in management information systems (MIS). Its objectives are to develop a basic understanding of the concepts and techniques needed in analyzing, designing, and managing these systems, and to explore the applications of computers and information technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of individuals, groups, and organizations.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor or CME or ISE major; U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Pre- or Corequisites: BUS 348 ; BUS 215; MAT 122

3 credits

BUS 343 Expert Systems in Business

Examines the technology of expert systems, with special attention to business applications, including manufacturing and service facilities. Included are the history of expert systems; issues in knowledge acquisition, implementation and validation; actual applications in the world of business; hands-on development of a simple expert system.

Prerequisites for BUS majors: BUS 110 or BUS 115; BUS 340

Prerequisites for ISE majors: BUS 110 or BUS 111 or BUS 112; BUS 340

3 credits

BUS 344 Decision Support Systems

Focuses on the interrelationship between management information systems and management science. Students apply knowledge from these fields to develop a decision support system. They identify an appropriate business application, build the required information system, and implement the suitable management science methodology. At the end of the course, students demonstrate how their decision support system addresses the stated management problem and describe how their system works.

Prerequisites for BUS majors: BUS 110 or BUS 115; BUS 220; BUS 340

Prerequisites for ISE or AMS majors: BUS 110 or BUS 111 or BUS 112; BUS 220; BUS 340

3 credits

BUS 346 Management and Operations

Analysis and design of manufacturing and service

systems. Topics include quality management, product and service design, process selection and capacity planning, design of work systems, inventory management, aggregate planning, material requirements planning, and just-in-time systems.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor or ISE major

Advisory Pre- or Corequisites: BUS 110 or BUS 111 or  BUS 112 or BUS 115

3 credits

BUS 348 Principles of Marketing

Basic marketing concepts and their applications. Issues include strategy, market segmentation, individual consumer behavior, marketing research, promotion, pricing and international marketing. The emphasis is on analysis of the challenges facing business with respect to all relevant constituencies, including the company in general, managerial colleagues across functional areas, consumers, stockholders, and government. May not be taken for credit in addition to BUS 349.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor or ISE major

Advisory Pre- or Corequisites: BUS 110 or BUS 111 or  BUS 112 or BUS 115

3 credits

BUS 349 Principles of Marketing and Sustainable Products and Services

Provides an understanding of marketing principles, including the "4 P's" of marketing: Products, Promotion, Price and Place (distribution channels), as they relate to new environmentally responsible marketing activities and ways of marketing to environmental sustainability industries.  Foci include (1) how real world trends will affect marketing planning and decisions as we moved into a "greener" 21st century global community and (2) how to achieve profitability through customer satisfaction and utilizing environmentally sustainable best practices.  Students will be required to demonstrate their understanding of the readings and class discussions via their own analyses of how this information relates to specific marketing issues of their choosing.  May not be taken for credit in addition to BUS 348.

Prerequisites: BUS 112; BUS 215

3 credits

BUS 350 Internet Marketing

Examines two intimately related issues: the impact of E-Commerce on businesses and the use of computer-mediated (Internet) marketing. Student develop an awareness and understanding of relevant issues, advantages and disadvantages, and specific techniques involved in using the Internet as a marketing vehicle. Emphasis on using the Internet as a tool for marketers to increase effectiveness, efficiency and competitiveness of distribution, advertising, brand building, pricing, promotions, new product development, customer service and market research.

Prerequisites: BUS Major; BUS 115 or BUS 112 or BUS 110; BUS 340; BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 351 Human Resource Management

Major trends in personnel management, including problems and issues faced by organizations and individuals in times of change. Responsibilities of the human resources department and the roles that every manager plays, both as a supervisor and as a client of the human resources department, are studied. Topics include human resources forecasting and planning job design, employee selection, test development and validation, equal employment opportunity laws and judicial rulings, performance appraisal, compensation, benefits, career development, safety, and labor relations.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor or MTD major

Advisory Pre- or Corequisites: BUS 110 or BUS 111 or  BUS 112 or BUS 115

3 credits

BUS 352 Electronic Commerce

Introduction to Internet backbone and security. Business-to-Business (B2B) development and Business-to-Consumer (B2C) marketing.

Prerequisites: BUS Major; BUS 115 or BUS 110 or BUS 112; BUS 340; BUS 346; BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 353 Entrepreneurship

The essential qualities of new and growing enterprises are examined. Examples of both successful and failed new ventures are given by entrepreneurs. Students develop a business plan for their own business and present it to venture capitalists for their expert analysis.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor or Engineering major; U3 or U4 standing

Corequisite for Engineering majors: enrollment in a relevant senior design course

3 credits

BUS 354 Understanding Business Agreements

Provides students with an understanding of legal

documents in business and the business transactions behind them. Students review many types of legal

documents likely to be encountered in a business career. Includes: agreements between business partners (stockholders and partnership agreements); technology and employment related agreements (confidentiality, employment, and joint development agreements); and commercial transactions (sales, loan, and acquisition agreements).

Prerequisites: BUS 110 or BUS 112; U3 or U4 standing; BUS or CEAS major

3 credits

BUS 355 Investment Analysis

The theoretical and empirical study of financial markets. Topics include portfolio selection, asset pricing, market efficiency, evaluation of fixed income securities, options and futures pricing.

Prerequisites: Business major or AMS or ECO or ISE or MTD major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 330 or ECO 389

3 credits

BUS 356 Financial Engineering

Financial engineering applied to corporations and investments. The financial mathematics of leveraged buyouts, refinancings, mergers and acquisitions. Modeling and investment analysis of stocks, bonds, commodities, foreign futures, options and other derivatives. Stochastic differential equations for options pricing. Quadratic optimization and portfolio performance attribution.

Prerequisites: Business major or AMS or ECO or ISE or MTD major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 330 or ECO 389

3 credits

BUS 357 Principles of Sales

Presents the skills to be successful in an extremely competitive business sales environment. Includes customer qualification, prospecting, sales message, sales demonstration, handling objections, closing techniques, and telemarketing and customer service activities.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 358 Marketing Research

Introduces marketing research tools that aid managers in marketing decision-making and how the marketing research process can be used to collect and analyze data and information to solve marketing problems. A strong applied orientation exposes students to marketing research in traditional areas such as market segmentation, product positioning, product design, brand perception, and sales forecasting, as well as emerging areas including customer satisfaction, customer relationship management (CRM), and on-line marketing.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 359 Consumer Behavior

Examines the basic concepts underlying consumer behavior with the goal of understanding how these concepts can be applied in analyzing and solving marketing problems.

Prerequisites: Business major; U3 or U4 standing; BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 360 Business Marketing

Well over half of our economy flows through business-to-business (B2B) transactions but the nature of marketing from business to different organizations receives less attention than consumer marketing. This course examines marketing from business to businesses, government bodies, educational institutions, and non-profit organizations. Frameworks for understanding organizational needs and demands as well as their buying processes are considered. Customer Relationship Management (CRM) for organizational customers is presented and analyzed for implications into a field team approach to both marketing and sales.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 362 Principles of International Marketing

Course incorporates functions of the marketing organization whose responsibility is to direct and lead the total international marketing enterprise.   It addresses the 4 P's of marketing and other marketing principles and how they apply to global markets.

Prerequisite: BUS major

Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 365 Financial Management

Show managers how to interface with accounting and finance departments, understand how firms meet their financial objectives utilizing financial decision-making. Explanation of financial tools and techniques, which can be used to help firms maximize value by improving decisions relating to capital budgeting, capital structure, and working capital management. Other related topics including multinational financial management, risk management, mergers and acquisitions.

Prerequisites: Business major or AMS or ECO or ISE or MTD major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 330 or ECO 389

3 credits

BUS 366 Money and Financial Institutions

The characteristics of money and financial institutions within the financial system. Organization and operations of the Federal Reserve System, U.S. Banks and the U.S. Treasury. Details on how these financial institutions impact on the financial system. Determination of interest rates. Study of the framework and the management of banking and non-bank financial intermediaries.

Prerequisites: BUS 110 or BUS 112 or BUS 115; BUS 330 or ECO 389; BUS Major or Minor; ECO or ISE or MTD major

3 credits

BUS 368 Marketing New Sustainable Products

The development of new sustainable products and services represents one of the key processes firms can exploit to maintain and expand their market position in today's dynamic, global, environmentally sensitive world.  New sustainable products and services are critical to successful growth and increased profits in many industries.  In this course students learn how to use state-of-the-art management and research methods to identify markets, develop new product and service ideas, measure customer expectations and benefits, design profitable products and services, implement market tests, and track the success of new products and services through the life cycle.  This course may not be taken for credit in addition to BUS 369.

Prerequisites: BUS Major; BUS 210; BUS 348 or BUS 349; BUS 358

3 credits

BUS 369 Marketing of New Products

Techniques for conceptualization, design, development, testing, and launch of new products from marketers perspective. Identification of applicable products

feature design/positioning for different target markets shown through use of various quantitative and qualitative techniques. Course is equally applicable for physical goods, services, and digital/information products. Focus on new (radical, discontinuous) products versus product extensions. This course may not be taken for credit in addition to BUS 368.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 348 or BUS 349; BUS 358

3 credits

BUS 370 Lean Practices in Operations

Global competitive forces are driving the adoption of lean practices in service, retail, and production operations. Using examples from diverse industry leaders such as Wal Mart, Dell, McDonald's, and Toyota, this course examines the application of the Seven Deadly Wastes, Just-in-Time, Value Stream Mapping, and Supply Chain Alliances.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 346

3 credits

BUS 371 Supply Chain Management

Analysis of the activities and mechanics of purchasing and materials management. Emphasizes make vs. buy decisions in the private and public sectors, single vs. multiple sourcing, competitive bidding vs. negotiations, delivery system logistics, purchasing ethics and vendor relations, international purchasing, ISO 9000 and computerized inventory systems. This course may not be taken for credit in addition to BUS 373.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 346

3 credits

BUS 372 Quality Management

The philosophies, tools, and techniques to identify and meet internal and external customer needs. Emphasis on the importance of satisfying the customer's perception of quality as a strategic necessity in Operations Manage­ment. Topics include Total Quality Management (TQM), quality control, statistical process control, and Six Sigma.

Prerequisites: Business major

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 346

3 credits

BUS 373 Supply Chain and Environmental Management

The course provides an analysis of the activities and mechanics of purchasing and materials management with emphasis on sustainable practices and their influence on buy-make decisions, including private and public sector and deals with issues of single versus multiple sourcing, competitive bidding versus negotiations, the logistics of delivery systems, purchasing ethics and vendor relations, international purchasing, ISO 9000, ISO 14000 (sustainability standards) and computerized inventory systems, such as radio frequency identification (RFID) and executable internet applications.  Sustainability issues include environmental impact in the area of raw material extraction, value-added conversion/treatment, waste management, packaging, distribution, and recycling by the end user/consumer.  This course may not be taken for credit in addition to BUS 371.

Prerequisite: BUS Major; BUS 346r

3 credits

BUS 374 Environmental Impact of Business

This course provides an overview of standards, methods, and strategies for environmental impact assessment and policy implementation.  Areas for analysis include energy consumption, raw materials, recycling, transportation, emissions, waste, and product and service materials and manufacturing processes.  Legal requirements and regulation are examined for the U.S. and other countries.  Case studies involving leading-edge companies. are examined.  ISO 14000 standards are discussed, as they provide the basis for corporate environmental impact audit and goal setting.

Prerequisite: BUS major

3 credits

BUS 380 Honors-Research Methods

Prepares students for business research and the honors research project. Practical business applications drawn from a variety of functional areas including strategic management, marketing, operations, finance, and human resource management. Industries include high technology, retail, banking, and manufacturing. Research methodologies include survey design, interviewing, observational methods, and experimental design. Research process includes problem finding, literature review, and proposal writing.

Prerequisites: Admission to the honors program in business management; BUS 110 or BUS 112, 210, 249, and 340

3 credits

BUS 382 Honors-Organizational Behavior Research

Focus on the use of survey and experimental social science methods in developing and empirically testing hypotheses and theories concerning the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. Theoretical frameworks for analyzing behavior drawn from an array of disciplines including social and cognitive psychology and behavioral decision making. Practical business applications drawn from a variety of functional areas including strategic management, marketing, and human resource management, as well as from industries including high technology, retail, and the law. Research methodologies including survey design, experimental design, analysis of variance, and multiple regression techniques.

Prerequisites: Admission to the honors program in business management; BUS 110 or BUS 112, 210, 249, and 340

Pre- or Corequisite: BUS 380

3 credits

BUS 384 Honors-Operations Research and Management

Familiarizes students with a variety of operations research methods used in order to support effective decision making in business settings and for the development of creative applications of operations research methodology in the business settings of their choice.

Prerequisites: Admission to the honors program in business management; BUS 110 or BUS 112, 210, 249, and 340

3 credits

BUS 386 Honors-Business Statistics

Prepares students to perform appropriate statistical analyses of data relevant to their chosen research projects. Demonstrates the applications of statistical analysis in business practice and research. Students learn to perform standard analyses using a statistical software package and to become educated consumers of statistical analyses performed by others.

Prerequisite: BUS 380; Admission to the Honors Program in Business Management

3 credits

BUS 388 Honors-Research in Finance

Focus on understanding how firms meet and manage their financial objectives. Current financial environment, institutions and markets, risk and return, valuing future cash flow, and corporate securities including stocks and bonds. Financial tools and techniques such as capital budgeting, used by firms to maximize value through better decisions relating to capital. Case studies and class discussion seeking an innovative approach to finance concepts and towards integration of concepts for research.

Prerequisites: Admission to the honors program in business management; BUS 110 or BUS 112, 210, 249, and 340

3 credits

BUS 391 Management of Sports Organizations

Introduction of fundamental issues pertinent to any business: planning organization, staffing, and controlling. It discusses areas the sports manager is likely to encounter while conducting business, such as federal legislation influencing the sport business, employment related issues, funding and budgeting, risk management, site selection and customer service.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor; U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 393 Principles of Project Management

In both the service and manufacturing sectors, problem solving and decision making play very important roles. A manager needs to concentrate on the data associated with the problem and, more specifically, engage in the quantitative analysis phase of the decision-making process. This course will familiarize students with the quantitative approach used in management sciences so that they can evaluate the sources of recommendations and ultimately make the best possible decision. Special emphasis will be made throughout this course on data analysis using Microsoft Excel.Spell Check Long Description (Alt+5)

Prerequisites: BUS Major or Minor

Pre- or Corequisite: BUS 346

3 credits

BUS 400 External Auditing

This course is designed to introduce and explore basic auditing principles, concepts and applications within the context of the audit of an annual financial statement.  This course will review the audit process and cover the following:  planning (identification of the risks of material misstatement); application of procedures 9reducing audit risk below an acceptable level); assessment (based upon documented audit evidence); and, reporting (in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards).  This course will also examine professional ethical standards and their relevance to the audit process.  Other topics will include auditing financial statements within the SEC and government environments as well as other assurance services.

Prerequisites: BUS Major; BUS 310

3 credits

BUS 401 Negotiation Workshop

Real-time "hands-on" experience in bargaining and negotiating. Students develop expertise in applying techniques for collaborative problem solving and resolving conflicts between parties. Topics include analysis of distributive (zero-sum) and integrative (win-win) bargaining situations, ethical and legal considerations, dealing with contentious and "tricky" negotiating tactics, psychological heuristics and biases, verbal and nonverbal communication, roles of agents in negotiation, mediation, inter- and intra-organizational negotiation, multi party negotiation, and cross-cultural negotiation. Students participate in in-class role-play situations involving negotiating with each other in a variety of realistic business and personal scenarios.

Prerequisite: Business major; U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 440 International Management

The increasing internationalization of markets is forcing firms to develop global strategies that protect profits and enhance value chains. This course will discuss the various aspects of international business including currency exchange, tariffs, BOP, economic parameters, regional labor practices and international channels of distribution. Concepts of cross-border wealth creation and various theories of trade will also be reviewed as well as the International Product Life Cycle. Socio-cultural components will be discussed with emphasis on management choices. Other topics such as location, topography and climate will also be reviewed.

Prerequisites: BUS Major or Minor or ECO or MTD Major; U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 441 Business Strategy

Capstone course that builds on tools and concepts introduced in more specialized business courses and on students' general business knowledge. Includes: methods for analysis of forces driving competition; identification of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats faced by individual corporations; and practical strategies for enabling new or existing firms to compete successfully within an industry. Case studies and in-class situations challenge students to develop skills in handling multidimensional business problems.

Prerequisites: BUS or CME or ECO or MTD Major; U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 447 Business Ethics

An introduction to traditional ethical theories and their application to business. A basis for understanding how ethical issues in business arise, and some strategies to control or resolve them, are derived from an examination of the work of philosophers and other writers relating to business ethics. Recent business case studies enable students to develop their own perspectives.

Prerequisites: Business major or minor or ECO or ISE or MTD major; U4 standing

3 credits

BUS 448 Marketing Strategy

A capstone course for students in the Marketing Specialization in which students apply a wide range of marketing principles to address problems different companies face in areas such as channel distribution, pricing, new product development, communication, promotions, strategic marketing alliances, positioning, and target marketing.

Prerequisites: Business major; U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 358

3 credits

BUS 450 Analysis and Design of Business Information Systems

Businesses and organizations develop information systems as a way to solve business problems or to capitalize on business opportunities. Hence, systems analysis is about business problem solving. Emphasis on important skills for the systems analyst such as fact-finding, communications, project management, and cost-benefit analysis. Presents analysis process and business information systems design. Focus on analyst's tools and techniques to document information systems development. Classical and object-oriented techniques for describing data flow, data structure, and process flow.

Prerequisites: Business major; U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisites: BUS 340

3 credits

CAR Career Development

CAR 110 Career Development and Decision Making

Introduces students to theories of career decision-making, and the relationship between major choice, academic planning, and career options. Examines two steps in the career decisions process: self-assessment (skills, interests, values, and personality traits) and career exploration.

Prerequisites: Satisfaction of the writing competency skill (D.E.C. A, first course); U1 or U2 standing

2 credits

CAR 210 Career Planning

Focuses on a systematic approach to the career

planning process, including goal setting, professional communication, job market trends, and career research strategies. Analyzes the value of extracurricular service, and leadership experiences, and how to convey this value through written and oral presentation. Examines components of successful transition to the workplace.

Prerequisites: Completion of D.E.C. category A; U3 or U4 standing

1 credit

CCS Cinema and Cultural Studies

CCS 396-H Video and Computer Game History

The course examines video/computer games as historical artifacts while studying the processes of writing/documenting the history of videogames. Students will engage with histories of gaming companies and platforms, game designer memoirs, fiction, criticism, game analysis, theoretical writing, descriptive historical accounts, preservation practices, and ephemeral forms of historic documentation. Students will also have hands-on access to various console games from the 1970s to the present. This course is offered as both CCS 396 and DIA 396.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 status; ARS/MUS/THR 208 or CCS 101 or DIA/CCS/ARH 207; completion of DEC E and DEC F

3 credits

CCS 397-H Video and Computer Game Culture

The course critically examines videogames within cultural, social, and political contexts. It will showcase the interaction between technology and culture and society by examining videogames in terms of play and game play, racial and gendered representation, racism and sexism, games in a global context of online play, power-relations between gamers, violence and moral panics, and military propaganda. This course is offered as both CCS 397 and DIA 397.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 status; ARS/MUS/THR 208 or CCS 101 or DIA/CCS/ARH 207; completion of DEC E and DEC F

3 credits

CHE Chemistry

CHE 348 Reaction Mechanisms in Organic Chemistry

Important classes of mechanisms of reactions useful in synthesis are explored. The kinetics and thermodynamics of these reactions are analyzed using modern structural theories. Examples of reaction types are substitutions, rearrangements, additions, eliminations, and selected organometallic reactions.

Prerequisite: CHE 322 or CHE 326

3 credits

CHI Chinese Language

CHI 301 Advanced Chinese I

The first part of an advanced course designed for the third-year students of Chinese as a foreign or heritage language to strengthen their ability to understand, speak, read, and write Chinese beyond the intermediate level. Students learn to read and comprehend a variety of texts from Chinese newspaper/magazine articles, TV/films, and literary works and to write creatively and professionally in Chinese using sophisticated vocabulary and advanced Chinese characters. Students will also be trained to comprehend authentic spoken Mandarin Chinese, using a variety of audio-visual materials and to communicate in Mandarin Chinese, applying appropriate socio-cultural norms. This course is not intended for students who already speak Chinese natively.

Prerequisite: CHI 212 or proficiency in Chinese

3 credits

CHI 302 Advanced Chinese II

The second part of an advanced course designed for the third-year students of Chinese as a foreign or heritage language to strengthen their ability to understand, speak, read, and write Chinese beyond the intermediate level. Students learn to read and comprehend a variety of texts from Chinese newspaper/magazine articles, TV/films, and literary works and to write creatively and professionally in Chinese using sophisticated vocabulary and advanced Chinese characters. Students will also be trained to comprehend authentic spoken Mandarin Chinese, using a variety of audio-visual materials and to communicate in Mandarin Chinese, applying appropriate socio-cultural norms. This course is not intended for students who already speak Chinese natively.

Prerequisite: CHI 311 or placement test

3 credits

CHI 411-J Readings in Journalistic Chinese

Narrative readings in Chinese selected from Chinese newspapers and magazines, including news reports and narrations on life styles, people, and landscapes. Students are expected to improve their skills in the analysis and writing of narrative readings. This course is designed for students who already have advanced level proficiency in Chinese, who can read and write everyday vernacular Chinese, but who have not been exposed to more formal language and literary forms. Not for credit in addition to CHI 311.

Prerequisite: CHI 312 or proficiency in Chinese

3 credits

CHI 412-J Readings in Classical Chinese

ntroduction to writings in Chinese that appeared before the May 4th Movement (circa 1920), which marked the beginning of modern Chinese. The course introduces students to readings in classical Chinese and to acquaint students with cultures and customs of traditional China. This course is designed for students who already have advanced level proficiency in Chinese, who can read and write everyday vernacular Chinese, but who have not been exposed to more formal language and literary forms. Not for credit in addition to CHI 312.

Prerequisite: CHI 312 or proficiency in Chinese

3 credits

CHI 421-J Chinese Poetry and Short Stories

Selected masterpieces of poetry and short stories written during the first half of the 20th century. Students are expected to improve their skills in literature appreciation and to model their own writings after works read in class. This course is designed for students who already have advanced level proficiency in the Chinese language in all its forms including reading and writing. Not for credit in addition to the discontinued CHI 395 or CHI 321.

Prerequisite: Advanced level proficiency in Chinese

3 credits

CHI 422-J Chinese Lyric Prose and Plays

Selected masterpieces of lyric prose and drama written during the first half of the 20th century. Students are expected to improve their skills in literature appreciation and to model their own writings after works read in class. This course is designed for students who already have advanced level proficiency in the Chinese language in all its forms including reading and writing. Not for credit in addition to the discontinued CHI 396 or CHI 322.

Prerequisite: Advanced level proficiency in Chinese

3 credits

CSE Computer Science

CSE 311 Systems Administration

This course covers practical techniques to manage information systems, also known as IT Systems Admin­istration. Students will learn how to install computers for assorted hardware and software platforms (Windows, Unix/Linux, OS-X). Install networking equipment and configure it.  Install server software on several systems (e.g. web, database, mail) and configure it. Secure the network, hosts, and services, and apply system patches. Set up redundant computing services, virtual machines/services, and hardware so that services can survive some hardware/software failures. Evaluate the performance, reliability, and security of the overall system.

Prerequisites: CSE 214 or CSE 230 or CSE 260 or ISE 208

3 credits

CSE 323 Human-Computer Interaction

A survey course designed to introduce students to Human-Computer Interaction and prepare them for further study in the specialized topics of their choice.  Students will have the opportunity to delve deeper in the course through a course project, and through a two-three week special topic selected at the instructor's discretion.

Prerequisites: CSE 214 or CSE 230 or CSE 260

3 credits

CSE 326 Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing

Covers fundamentals of image transforms, image enhancement, image restoration, image compression, segmentation, representation and description, recognition and interpretation.

Prerequisites: CSE 214 or CSE 230 or CSE 260; AMS 210 or MAT 211

3 credits

CSE 327 Fundamentals of Computer Vision

Introduces fundamental concepts, algorithms, and techniques in visual information processing. Covers image formation, binary image processing, image features, model fitting, optics, illumination, texture, motion, segmentation, and object recognition.

Prerequisites: CSE 214 or CSE 230 or CSE 260; AMS 210 or MAT 211

3 credits

CSE 380 Computer Game Programming

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of computer game programming. Students design and develop original games for PCs applying proven game design and software engineering principles.

Prerequisite: CSE 214 or CSE 230 or CSE 260

3 credits

CSE 381 Advanced Game Programming

This course explores the concepts and technologies behind making 3D, networked games. This will include the examination of game engine creation as well as the use of middleware to build graphically sophisticated game systems.

Prerequisite: CSE 328 or CSE 380

3 credits

DIA Digital Arts

DIA 207 Digital Media: History and Theory

An introduction to historical and theoretical issues in digital media. Following discussion of basic concepts in studying digital media, the course focuses on examining the history of computer technologies, and their theoretical implications and cultural ramifications in the present. This course is offered as ARH 207, CCS 207, and DIA 207.

3 credits

DIA 396-H Video and Computer Game History

The course examines video/computer games as historical artifacts while studying the processes of writing/documenting the history of videogames. Students will engage with histories of gaming companies and platforms, game designer memoirs, fiction, criticism, game analysis, theoretical writing, descriptive historical accounts, preservation practices, and ephemeral forms of historic documentation. Students will also have hands-on access to various console games from the 1970s to the present. This course is offered as both CCS 396 and DIA 396.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 status; ARS/MUS/THR 208 or CCS 101 or DIA/CCS/ARH 207; completion of DEC E and DEC F

3 credits

DIA 397-H Video and Computer Game Culture

The course critically examines videogames within cultural, social, and political contexts. It will showcase the interaction between technology and culture and society by examining videogames in terms of play and game play, racial and gendered representation, racism and sexism, games in a global context of online play, power-relations between gamers, violence and moral panics, and military propaganda. This course is offered as both CCS 397 and DIA 397.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 status; ARS/MUS/THR 208 or CCS 101 or DIA/CCS/ARH 207; completion of DEC E and DEC F

3 credits

EEO Electrical Engineering Online

EEO 304 Electronic Instrumentation and Operational Amplifiers

Design of electronic instrumentation: structure of basic sensors and measurement systems, transducers, analysis and characteristics of operational amplifiers, analog signal conditioning with operational amplifiers, sampling, multiplexing, A/D and D/A conversion; digital signal conditioning, data input and display, and automated measurement systems.

Prerequisite: EEO 315

3 credits

EHM Environmental Humanities

EHM 118-E Introduction to the Natural History of Long Island 

This multi-disciplinary course focuses on the natural history of Long Island and the ecological analysis of local forests, salt marshes, marine intertidal systems and bogs.  During field labs, students will become familiar with observation techniques and conceptual approaches used to investigate ecological patterns and processes in the local environment.

3 credits

EHM 201-D Eco-Aesthetics in Art

Introduces the basic theoretical tools used to analyze and interpret works of fine art, environmental art, landscape architecture and architecture from an aesthetic perspective. Representative works of landscape painting (William Merrit Chase), environmental art (Robert Smithson), and landscape design (Frederick Law Olmstead) will be explored through formal lectures, class discussion and studios/site visits. Students will deconstruct the components of their surroundings and record their observations through the production of an artist¿s sketchbook. Emphasis will be placed on the multi-sensory examination of form, color, texture, and other principles and elements of art as they are manifested in these environments.

3 credits

EHM 314-J Civilizations and Collapse

A comparative study of the development and collapse of civilizations. Changing case studies drawn from prehistoric and historic societies in the Americas provide students with an in-depth understanding of the ways in which two non-Western cultures were affected by and attempted to cope with environmental change.  Students will learn to think critically about these processes and will complete the course with an increased awareness of the diversity of human responses to climactic change.

Prerequisite: SBC 111

3 credits

EHM 320-G Artists and Designers of the East End

Students trace the history of Long Island's East end artists and architects beginning with the work of Thomas Moran, Grosvenor Atterbury and William Merritt Chase through postwar artists Jackson Pollack and architect Richard Meier. Contemporary artists including Eric Fischl, April Gornick and Robert Wilson are studied and studio visits are made. Assignments center on primary research into the creative process through photo documentation and oral history.

 
 

Prerequisite: Completion of EHM 201-D or another DEC D course and U3 / U4 Standing

4 credits

EHM 330-J The Household in Non-Western Society

This course offers a survey of vernacular architecture in Non-Western societies worldwide. Students examine the design and meaning of vernacular architecture in a variety of cultures, exploring the ways in which construction practices and architectural design are shaped by cultural requirements and social mores. Special attention will be given to the future of vernacular architecture, and the ways in which housing may be designed to be both sustainable and culturally appropriate.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing
Advisory Prerequisite: ANT 102, ANT 104, or ARH 205

3 credits

EHM 331-J Precolumbian Urbanism

An examination of the development of Precolumbian cities throughout the Americas. Specific attention will be paid to the interaction of urban development and environment, as well as the ways in which culture and cosmology impact architectural design. In depth consideration will be given to urban architecture of specific cultural groups in North, Central, and South America.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

ESG Engineering Science

ESG 198 Fundamentals of Engineering Chemistry

A quantitative introduction to chemistry (stoichiometry, bonding, states of matter, equilibrium) with emphasis on topics of interest to students in engineering (metals and semiconductors; thermochemistry; electrochemistry and corrosion; polymers). Labs include an introduction to analytical techniques, electrochemistry and chemical synthesis. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are emphasized. May not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 131/133, 141/143.

Pre- or Corequisites: PHY 132 or 142 or 126 and 127; MAT 127 or 132 or 142 or AMS 161

4 credits

ESG 333 Materials Science II: Electronic Properties

After a review of quantum mechanics and atomic physics, the binding energy and electronic energy levels in molecules and solids are discussed. The free-electron theory of metals is introduced and applied to the quantitative treatment of a number of electron emission effects. The band theory of solids is developed quantitatively via the Kronig-Penney model, and the transport properties of metals and semiconductors are discussed in detail. The physical principle of pn junctions, transistors, tunnel diodes, etc. is explained. Fundamentals and applications of photoconductors, lasers, magnetic materials, and superconductors are also discussed. (ESG 332 is not a prerequisite.)

Prerequisite: ESG 281 or PHY 251; ESG 302 or CME 304

4 credits

ESM Materials Science

ESM 350 Advanced Engineering Laboratory

Students work in teams to perform advanced laboratory projects that emphasize the structure-property relationship. Emphasis on statistical analysis, multivariate fitting of data, and technical manuscript preparation.

Prerequisites: ESG 312; ESG 332; ESG 333

3 credits

ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice

A design engineering course oriented toward both research/development and manufacturing technology. Students work in actual industrial programs carried out cooperatively with companies established as university incubators or with regionally located organizations. Supervised by a committee of faculty and industry representatives to which students report.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

0-6 credits

EST Technology and Society

EST 323 Human-Computer Interaction

A survey course designed to introduce students to Human-Computer Interaction and prepare them for further study in the specialized topics of their choice.  Students will have the opportunity to delve deeper

in the course through a course project, and through a two-three week special topic selected at the instructor's discretion.

Prerequisites: CSE 214 or CSE 230 or CSE 260

3 credits

ISE Information Systems

ISE 311 Systems Administration

This course covers practical techniques to manage information systems, also known as IT Systems Administration.  Students will learn how to install computers for assorted hardware and software platforms (Windows, Unix/Linux, OS-X). Install networking equipment and configure it. Install server software on several systems (e.g. web, database, mail) and configure it. Secure the network, hosts, and services, and apply system patches. Set up redundant computing services, virtual machines/services, and hardware so that services can survive some hardware/software failures. Evaluate the performance, reliability, and security of the overall system.

Prerequisites: CSE 214 or CSE 230 or CSE 260 or ISE 208

3 credits

ISE 323 Human-Computer Interaction

A survey course designed to introduce students to Human-Computer Interaction and prepare them for further study in the specialized topics of their choice. Students will have the opportunity to delve deeper in the course through a course project, and through a two-three week special topic selected at the instructor's discretion.

Prerequisites: CSE 214 or CSE 230 or CSE 260

3 credits

IAP International Academic Programs

IAP 390 American History and Society

Overview of U.S. history from the time of European arrival on the North American continent to the present day, followed by an examination of crucial issues of American life and culture.  Readings and discussions consider the social, economic, political, and cultural developments that have shaped the United States, and are crucial for the understanding of contemporary America. International students who participate in their university's Junior Year abroad program hosted and administered by IAP take this course.

Prerequisite: Participation in the Junior Year Abroad program

3 credits

IAP 391 American Society and Culture

The interplay between social structure and culture that produces and reproduces American society is the main focus of this course. Students will consider selected social institutions such the as family, immigration, workplace (focusing on gender equity), media, markets and social movements in American society. Reflections on these institutions, will employ a sociological analyses derived from documentary films/ movies as well as journal articles and book chapters.

Prerequisite: Participation in the Junior Year Abroad program

3 credits

JRN Journalism

JRN 310 News III: Reporting, Writing and Production for Broadcast

Students are introduced to the skills needed to report and write news stories for television and radio. Students will become familiar with the proper use of pictures and sound in broadcast journalism, and become comfortable writing  news reports in a variety of broadcast formats. Students also are expected to become familiar with a variety of broadcast production tools, including  the basics of Final Cut Pro and video photography.

Prerequisite: JRN 210 and 211

3 credits

JRN 370 Advanced Reporting, Writing and Production for Broadcast

This course builds on the work of JRN 310 and is offered in a workshop/production environment. There is focus on mastering the reporting of breaking news, live reporting and developing story ideas. Emphasis also will be on shooting techniques. Students will produce longer-form reports.

Prerequisite: JRN 310

Pre- or Corequisite: JRN 350 or permission

3 credits

LIN Linguistics

LIN 101-F Human Language

An introduction to the fundamental areas and concepts of modern linguistics. Sounds and their structure, word structure, and sentence structure are discussed. Other topics may include historical linguistics (how languages change over time), dialects, writing systems, language and the brain, and psycholinguistics (especially the question of how children acquire a language).

3 credits

MAT Mathematics

MAT 118-C Mathematical Thinking

Development of quantitative thinking and problem solving abilities through a selection of mathematical topics: logic and reasoning; numbers, functions, and modeling; combinatorics and probability; growth and change. Other topics may include geometry, statistics, game theory, and graph theory. Through their engagement in problem solving, students develop an appreciation of the intellectual scope of mathematics and its connections with other disciplines.

Prerequisite: C or better in MAP 103 or level 2+ or higher on the mathematics placement examination

(Prerequisite must be met within one year of beginning this course.)

3 credits

MAT 122-C Overview of Calculus with Applications

The basics of calculus in a self-contained, one-semester course. Properties and applications of polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Derivatives: slopes, rates of change, optimization, integrals, area, cumulative change, and average. The fundamental theorem of calculus. Emphasis on modeling examples from economics. Students who subsequently wish to enroll in MAT 125 or 131 will be required to take MAT 130 as a pre- or corequisite to either course or to score level 4 on the mathematics placement examination before taking either course.

Prerequisite: C or better in MAP 103 or level 3 or higher on the mathematics placement examination

(Prerequisite must be met within one year of beginning this course.)

3 credits

MAT 123-C Introduction to Calculus

Comprehensive preparation for the regular calculus sequences, with introduction to derivatives. Careful development of rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, and their applications. Asymptotics and limits. Linear approximations, slope and derivatives, detailed curve sketching. General modeling examples.

Prerequisite: C or better in MAP 103 or level 3 or higher on the mathematics placement examination

(Prerequisite must be met within one year of beginning this course.)

3 credits

MAT 125-C Calculus A

Differential calculus, emphasizing conceptual understanding, computations and applications, for students who have the necessary background from 12th-year high school mathematics. Differentiation of elementary algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; graphing; modeling; and maximization. May not be taken for credit in addition to MAT 131 or 141 or AMS 151.

Prerequisite: C or higher in MAT 123; or level 4 on the mathematics placement examination; or MAT 122 and coregistration in MAT 130

3 credits

MEC Mechanical Engineering

MEC 112 Practical C/C++ for Scientists and Engineers

Introduces computer sciences and the use of the computer for solving scientific and engineering problems using the C/C++ programming language. Students gain experience using graphical interface (GUI) and object-oriented programming concepts. Primarily for engineering students who are not planning to take advanced computer science courses. Students who have earned a C or higher in CSE 114 may not take MEC 112.

Prerequisites: AMS 151 or MAT 125, 131 or 141; PHY 125, 131/133 or 141

3 credits

MUS Music

MUS 109-D Rock Music

A study of rock music, including an investigation of its musical constituents-rhythm, form, pitch structure, instrumental texture, and vocal style-and a historical survey beginning with the roots of rock in earlier folk and popular styles and tracing its development from the end of World War II to the present. Special attention is paid to various syntheses of African and European traditions.

3 credits

MUS 344 Audio Engineering

A theoretical examination of the principals of operation of the essential components of the sound recording and reinforcement chain from acoustic venue, through transduction, electronic manipulation and storage, and the reproduction of the acoustic field in various listening environments.

Prerequisite: One ARS, CSE, ISE, MUS, or THR course

Advisory Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR 208

3 credits

PHY Physics

PHY 274 Physical and Mechanical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics

Physical and mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics. Maxwell waves and their properties: intensity, energy density, and momentum density. Planck-Einstein relation between energy and frequency for light quanta. De Broglie relation between momentum and wavelength. Number density and probability density of photons. One-photon quantum mechanics, with Maxwell field as the wave function. Diffraction phenomena. Uncertainty relation between wavelength and position, hence between momentum and position. Not for credit in addition to PHY 390 with similar topic.

Prerequisites: PHY 122, or PHY 126 and PHY 127, or PHY 132 and PHY 134, or PHY 142; MAT 132 or MAT 142 or MAT 127 or MAT 171 or AMS 161

Advisory Corequisites: MAT 203 or MAT 205 or AMS 261

4 credits

PSY Psychology

PSY 301 Advanced Statistics

Survey of probability and sampling theory, descriptive and inferential statistics, and introduction to experimental design.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 325 Children's Cognitive Development

A survey of the basic principles of cognition from experimental research with children. Topics include perceptual development, language development, memory development, conceptual development, and the development of academic skills.

Prerequisite: PSY 220

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 329 Special Topics in Developmental Psychology

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: PSY 220

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 333 Mood Disorders

The mood disorders include bipolar (manic-depressive) and depressive disorders.  They are among the most common psychological disorders, and are a tremendous personal, social, and economic burden.  This course will provide an introduction to current theory and research on the mood disorders, including their classification, epidemiology, course, etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment. Not for credit in addition to PSY 339 with topic of "Mood Disorders."

Prerequisite: PSY 230

3 credits

PSY 335 Clinical Behavior Modification

The application of behavioral and cognitive sciences to the assessment and treatment of clinical problems. The aims of the course are to familiarize the student with the theoretical and empirical foundations of clinical behavior modification, provide examples of applications to a variety of different clinical problems, and discuss the results of outcome studies. While specific treatment methods are described and issues related to clinical application are discussed, no actual clinical training or practicum is provided in this course.

Prerequisites: PSY 230

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 338 Behavior Deviation in Children

Development and modification of behavioral deviations in children; application of principles derived from experimental analysis of behavior to problems of children.

Prerequisites: PSY 220

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 339 Special Topics in Clinical Psychology

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: PSY 230

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 341 Psychology of Prejudice

An overview of theoretical perspectives, research methods, empirical findings, and practical applications of psychological research on prejudice. Topics include the development of prejudice among children; the role of cognitive, social, personality, and motivational factors in maintaining prejudice and stigma; the psychological consequences of prejudice and stigma; and strategies for reducing prejudice, stigma, and intergroup conflict.

Prerequisites: PSY 240

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 342 Psychology of Drug Addiction

Review of drugs from a historical perspective and motivations for drug use. Importance is placed on psychological theories that attempt to understand drug addiction, including the role of classical and operant conditioning processes, genetic factors in alcoholism and smoking, the role of expectancies, and the contribution of personality. Various prevention and treatment approaches to drug addiction and their effectiveness are examined. The use of alcohol and tobacco are addressed in-depth, as those drugs cause many more deaths and disabilities than illicit drugs. Not for credit in addition to PSY 348 or 349 when the topic is Drug Addiction or Psychology of Addictive Behavior.

Prerequisites: PSY 240

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 345 Theories of Personality

The study of the ways in which people differ. Examines traditional and current thinking and research about the nature and causes of the individual patterns of behavior, emotion, and thinking that we call personality.

Prerequisites: PSY 240

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 346 Health Psychology

The role of psychological factors in the maintenance of good health or in coping with illness. Topics include the modification of specific health behavior, such as alcoholism, obesity, lack of exercise, and smoking; the relationship of stress and illness; and coping with terminal illnesses.

Prerequisites: PSY 240

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 349 Special Topics in Social Psychology

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 357 Animal Learning

Principles of adaptation and behavioral change with emphasis on techniques of reward and punishment and of stimulus control.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 359 Special Topics in Biopsychology

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: PSY 250

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 365 The Psychology of Language

Examination of language acquisition and a consideration of its implication for cognitive psychology.

Prerequisites: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 366 Human Problem Solving

An exploration of human problem solving and critical thinking. Topics include memory strategies, the role of language in thinking, inductive and deductive reasoning, creativity, and the development of problem solving skills.

Prerequisites: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 367 Memory

A review of classic and current theories of memory and empirical research on memory in memory-intact and memory-impaired populations.

Prerequisites: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 368 Sensation and Perception

An examination of both the basic mechanisms and the organizational processes of visual and auditory perception. Topics include the perception of color, depth, movement, pitch, loudness, speech, and music.

Prerequisites: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 369 Special Topics in Cognition and Perception

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 488 Internship

Participation in public and private agencies and organizations. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final written report on their experience to the faculty sponsor and department. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: 12 credits in psychology including PSY 310; permission of the supervising faculty member and undergraduate director

0-6 credits, S/U grading

PSY 491, 492 Advanced Seminar in Psychology

Special seminars covering current research theory. Topics are announced prior to the beginning of each semester. May be repeated up to a limit of 18 credits. Students may take two sections in a single semester. May not be taken for more than six credits per faculty member during the student's career.

Prerequisites: PSY 310; permission of instructor

1-3 credits per course

RLS Religious Studies

RLS 280-J Islam

An introduction to the main features of Islamic revelation as contained in the Koran and its impact on the major spiritual, intellectual, legal, and social teachings and institutions of the Islamic world. The course concludes with an examination of Islam in the modern world. This course is offered as both AAS 280 and RLS 280.

3 credits

RLS 366-G Feminine Spirituality

The role and destiny of human beings as envisaged by the world's great traditions, especially the Chinese and the Islamic. The course focuses on the concept of femininity as a principle in the realms of theology, metaphysics, cosmology, and spiritual psychology; and the theoretical and practical applications of the feminine principle to the place of both men and women in society. Topics include feminine and masculine as metaphysical and cosmological principles; woman and religious law; woman's role in symbolism, mythology, and literature; and the feminine aspects of the self that both women and men need to develop on the path of achieving spiritual perfection. Previously offered as RLS 426, this course is now offered as RLS 366. Not for credit in addition to the former RLS 426. This course is offered as both AAS 366 and RLS 366.

Prerequisite: any 200-level or higher RLS course

3 credits

RLS 382-G Japanese Buddhism

An introduction to the teachings and practices of two major schools of Japanese Buddhism: Zen and Pure Land. The course focuses on the writings of the founders of the important lineages within these schools. Formerly offered as RLS 406, this course is now offered as both AAS 382 and RLS 382. Not for credit in addition to the former RLS 406.

Prerequisite: AAS/RLS 260

3 credits

RLS 387-J Islam and Confucianism

The goal of this course is to compare the basic teachings of Islam and Confucianism concerning the correct way to achieve true human status.  Special stress will be placed on books that Muslim scholars wrote in Chinese beginning in the seventeenth century.  These books employed Neo-Confucian language to introduce Chinese Muslims to their own theology, cosmology, and spiritual psychology, thus providing a rare pre-modern example of inter-religious dialogue. This course is offered as both AAS 387 and RLS 387.

Prerequisite: AAS 260 or RLS 260 or AAS 280 or RLS 280; U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

SBC Southampton Block Curriculum

SBC 117-D Design Drawing

This introductory course exposes the student to the fundamental theories and practices employed in visually representing design concepts from observational through technical and speculative drawing.  The course content introduces the student to contour drawing, rendering, orthographic projection, and pictorial drawing.  Project work engages the student in the application of the above-mentioned drawing techniques and develops skills through the solution of student tailored problems.

3 credits

THR Theatre Arts

THR 101-D Introduction to Theatre Arts

An overview of performance, design, and production in the theatre. Specific texts are explored through lectures, demonstrations, and a close examination of the rehearsal process. Professionals working in the theatre are invited to speak on such topics as stage management, technical production, and direction.

Not for theatre arts major credit.

3 credits

THR 103-D Introduction to Theatre Design and Technology

An introduction to theatrical design and technology using examples from Broadway to the avant-garde. The course will examine genres, innovations, cultural context, and creative processes for the use of theatre space and the creation of design. The course will take a cross-disciplinary approach while examining traditional modes of design and the rapidly expanding use of media arts and new technologies in theatre productions.

3 credits

THR 201-B Theatre History I: Greeks to Moliere

A survey of the developments in theatre from the ancient Greeks to Moliere. The course will introduce the major periods and dramatic forms in theatre history, and explore the historical and social context in which dramatic work was created. Topics will include major plays and dramatists, theatre practitioners, innovations, and the role of theatre in a particular culture and society.

Advisory Prerequisites: THR 101 or THR 104

3 credits

THR 202-B Theatre History II: Restoration to the 20th Century

A survey of the developments in theatre from the English Restoration to the 20th Century. The course will introduce the major periods and dramatic forms in theatre history, and explore the historical and social context in which dramatic work was created. Topics will include major plays and dramatists, theatre practitioners, innovations, and the role of theatre in a particular culture or society.

Prerequisite: THR 201

Advisory Prerequisites: THR 101 or THR 104

3 credits

THR 315-I European History and Drama: The Classical Era

Advanced studies in select topics in theatre history. Developments in theatre from its origins to the 17th century. Periods covered include ancient Greek and Roman theatre, the Middle Ages, Italian Renaissance, Commedia dell'Arte, the English Renaissance, the Golden Age of Spain, French neo-classicism, German theatre, the English Restoration, and the early 18th century. Discussions cover the historical and cultural context in which different forms of theatre occurred, changes in theatrical convention, and the drama of

the period.

Prerequisites: Completion of D.E.C. categories A, B, and D

3 credits

THR 316-I European History and Drama: The Modern Era

Advanced studies in select topics in theatre history. Developments in theatre from the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution to the present. Topics covered include melodrama, romanticism, realism, expressionism, the birth of the avant garde, post-war modernism, and trends at the end of the twentieth century. Discussions cover the historical and cultural context in which different forms of theatre occurred, changes in theatrical convention, and the drama of the period.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. categories A and D and THR 104

3 credits

THR 405 Advanced Topics in Acting

Advanced work in classical or contemporary text analysis, scene study, monologues and/or soliloquies limited to one or two major playwrights.  May be repeated for credit once as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: THR 205 and THR 230

Advisory Prerequisite: THR 322

3 credits

THR 438 Directing I

The work of the director, including selection of a play for production; problems of style, interpretation, and execution; and the director's approach to the actor. Not for credit in addition to THR 333.

Prerequisites: THR 205; THR 320 or 321

3 credits

WRT Writing

WRT 101-A 1 Introductory Writing Workshop

Frequent short papers are designed to help students develop fluency and correctness. The basic requirements of academic writing are introduced. A through C/Unsatisfactory grading only. The Pass/No credit option may not be selected for this course. WRT 101 Does not count towards D.E.C. A requirement for students matriculating before fall 1999. WRT 101 is not for credit in addition to EGC 100. Due to the content of the course, enrollment after the first week of class is not permitted.

Prerequisite: Students who do not meet the prerequisites for WRT 102 or who do not qualify for enrollment in ESL courses must take WRT 101

3 credits, ABC/U grading

WRT 102-A 2 Intermediate Writing Workshop A

Writing for academic purposes is emphasized. Students learn strategies for extended writing assignments at the university. At least three major essays, multiple drafts, and short papers are required. A through C/Unsatisfactory grading only. The Pass/No Credit option may not be used. Due to the content of the course, enrollment after the first week of class is not permitted.

Prerequisite: WRT 100 or 101; or 3 or higher on the AP English/Comp or English/Lit exams; or 1000 or higher on the combined verbal and writing portions of the SAT I; or C or higher in a college writing course judged equivalent to WRT 100 or WRT 101

3 credits, ABC/U grading

WRT 103-A 2 Intermediate Writing Workshop B

In-depth practice working through specific types of academic writing such as analysis, argument, and the research paper. Different sections have different emphases. See the Program in Writing and Rhetoric for current offerings. May be repeated once with permission of the director. A through C/Unsatisfactory grading only. The Pass/No Credit option may not be used. Due to the content of the course, enrollment after the first week of class is not permitted.

Prerequisite: completion of WRT 102 or permission of instructor

3 credits, ABC/U grading

WRT 200 Grammar and Style for Writers

Students will study the aspects of grammar that are most relevant to punctuation and to clear writing, including nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, nominative and accusative cases, phrases, clauses, gerunds, participles, infinitives, and complete sentences. Sentence imitation, sentence combining, and sentence invention techniques will also be used to help students become more flexible in their syntactic fluidity. There will be five tests, three short papers, and a final exam.

3 credits

WRT 301 Writing in the Disciplines: Special Topics

Writing in specified academic disciplines is taught through the analysis of texts in appropriate fields to discover discourse conventions.  Students produce a variety of written projects typical of the genres in the field.  Different sections emphasize different disciplines.  Typical topics will be Technical Writing, Business Writing, Legal Writing, and Writing for the Health Professions.  May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

3 credits

WRT 302 Critical Writing Seminar: Special Topics

A writing seminar , with rotating historical, political, social, literary, and artistic topics suggested by the professors each semester . Frequent substantial writing projects are central to every version of the cour se. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

3 credits