Updated Information - Programs

Updates since Spring 2009 are in red

Spring 2010 Updates

Applied Math and Statistics (AMS)

Acceptance into the Applied Mathematics and Statistics Major

Qualified freshman and transfer students who have indicated their interest in the major on their applications are accepted directly into the major upon admission to the University. Students who did not apply for the major and those who were not accepted into the major when they entered the University may apply directly to the Department only after completion of AMS 161 or MAT 132 or MAT 142 or MAT 127; AMS 210 or MAT 211; and CSE 110 or CSE 114 or CSE 130 or ESG 111 or MEC 111

Recommendations for Students Majoring in Applied Mathematics and Statistics

The Department encourages students to have a broad exposure to many types of mathematical reasoning and to its diverse roles in the social and natural sciences. During their first two years, students considering an AMS major are encouraged to take, in addition to the required calculus sequence, two semesters of physics numbered PHY 121 or higher; CSE 110 or CSE 113, CSE 114 or CSE 130 or ESG 111 or MEC 111 ; one other computer course (competence in computer programming is essential for many professional careers); and some economics. At the end of the sophomore year or the beginning of the junior year, students begin taking upper-division AMS courses, usually starting with AMS 301 and 310. At the same time, they are strongly encouraged to continue taking MAT and CSE courses and mathematically oriented courses in other departments, such as ECO 303. The following list of course sequences for certain professions is given as a preliminary guide to students with interests in these professions. Students should speak with faculty members specializing in these areas as early as possible for more information.

Biology (BIO)

Requirements for the major in Biology

Students must complete a minimum of 33 credits in Requirements A and C. (See Note 1). All courses used to satisfy requirements A and C must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher. At least one semester of each of the following two-semester sequences must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher: calculus, general chemistry lecture, organic chemistry lecture, and physics lecture /lab . Courses taken under the Pass/ No Credit option may not be used to satisfy major requirements.

 

C. Advanced Courses

All advanced Biology courses have one or more 200 level courses as a prerequisite. A grade of C or higher is required in each 200 level prerequisite in order to enroll in any 300 level Biology course. Students must complete one of the following specializations using the advanced biology lecture and laboratory courses listed below, and courses offered by related departments where specified:

Advanced Lecture Courses:

Area I: Cell Biology and Biochemistry -BIO 310, BIO 314, BIO 315, BIO 316, BIO 317*, BIO 361, BIO 362

Area II: Genetics and Development -BIO 320, BIO 325, BIO 339*

Area III: Neurobiology and Physiology -BIO 317*, BIO 328, BIO 334, BIO 338, BIO 339*

Area IV: Organisms -BIO 340, BIO 341, BIO 343, BIO 344, BIO 348, BIO 380, MAR 370, MAR 371

Area V: Ecology and Evolution -BIO 301, BIO 336, BIO 350, BIO 351, BIO 353, BIO 354, BIO 358, BIO 359, BIO 371, BIO 385, BIO 386, MAR 301, MAR 302, MAR 366, ANP 325.02, ANP 350.02, ANP 391.02

Advanced Laboratory Courses:

Area I BIO 311, BIO 313, BIO 365

Area II BIO 327

Area III BIO 335

Area IV BIO 340, BIO 341, BIO 343, BIO 344, BIO 380, MAR 380

Area V BIO 319, BIO 352, BIO 356, BIO 367, BIO 371, MAR 301, MAR 303, MAR 305, MAR 320, MAR 388 Area VI BIO 312

Biomedical Engineering Specialization

c  Breadth Requirement:

  1. One advanced biology lecture (which may include BIO 318)

Developmental Genetics Specialization

Breadth Requirement

  1. Two advanced biology lecture courses (which may include BIO 318) or lecture/laboratory courses

Ecology and Evolution Specialization

  1. Lecture/Laboratory Courses  

BIO 340 Zoology

BIO 341 Plant Diversity

BIO 343 Invertebrate Zoology

BIO 344 Chordate Zoology

BIO 371 Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems

BIO 380 Entomology

MAR 301 Environmental Microbiology

ii. Lecture Courses

BIO 301 Long Island Pine Barrens
 
BIO 336 Conservation Biology

BIO 348 Diversity and Evolution of Reptiles

BIO 350 Darwinian Medicine

BIO 353 Marine Ecology

BIO 358 Biology and Human Social and Sexual Behavior

BIO 359 Behavioral Ecology

BIO 385 Plant Ecology

BIO 386 Ecosystem Ecology in a Changing World

MAR 302 Marine Microbiology and Microbial Ecology

MAR 366 Plankton Ecology

MAR 370 Marine Mammals

MAR 371 The Biology and Conservation of Marine Birds and Sea Turtles

ANP 325.02 Primate Behavior (Madagascar)

ANP 350.02 Methods of Studying Primates (Madagascar)

ANP 391.02 Topics in Physical Anthropology (Madagascar)

Breadth Requirement

  1. Two advanced biology lecture (which may include BIO 318) or lecture/laboratory courses chosen from any area excluding Area IV, Organisms and
  2. One advanced biology laboratory (or lecture with laboratory) course chosen from any area excluding Area IV, Organisms and (See Note 3).

Environmental Biology Specialization

  1. BIO 351 Ecology
  2. Area Lecture/Laboratory Requirement: Three Two   courses chosen from the lists below. In choosing courses, students must include at least one course with laboratory. Students may take no more than one course from i. Organisms, and no more than one course from iii. The Environment.

ii. Ecology

BIO 301 Sustainability of the Long Island Pine Barrens

BIO 319 Landscape Ecology Laboratory

BIO 336 Conservation Biology

BIO 350 Darwinian Medicine

BIO 352 Ecology Lab

BIO 353 Marine Ecology

BIO 354 Evolution

BIO 356 Applied Ecology and Conservation Biology Laboratory

BIO 358 Biology and Human Social and Sexual Behavior

BIO 359 Behavioral Ecology
BIO 367 Molecular Diversity Laboratory

BIO 371 Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems (with lab)

BIO 385 Plant Ecology

BIO 386 Ecosystem Ecology in a Changing World

MAR 301 Environmental Microbiology (with lab)

MAR 302 Marine Microbiology and Microbial Ecology

MAR 303 Long Island Marine Habitats (with lab)

MAR 305 Experimental Marine Biology (lab)

MAR 320 Limnology (lab)

MAR 366 Plankton Ecology
MAR 388 Tropical Marine Ecology (lab)

ANP MAR 325.02 Primate Behavior (Madagascar)

ANP MAR 350.02 Methods of Studying Primates (Madagascar)

ANP MAR 391.02 Topics in Physical Anthropology (Madagascar)

c. Breadth Requirement

i. Two advanced biology lecture (which may include BIO 318) courses from outside the Environmental Biology specialization, chosen in consultation with the undergraduate biology advisor. At least one of the courses must include a laboratory component.

ii. One advanced biology laboratory course from any area excluding Area IV, Organisms and Area V, Ecology and Evolution. (See Note 3).

Notes:

3. Four credits and at least 2 semesters of independent biology research (BIO 486, BIO 487, BIO 489) may replace one upper division laboratory course. For specializations other than General Biology, the outside of concentration laboratory course may be replaced by such independent research.

Approved Research and Internship Courses:

General Biology Specialization:

BIO 484, BIO 486, BIO 487, BIO 489 Independent Research BIO 488 Internship

Bioengineering Specialization:

BME 499 Research in Bioengineering

BIO 488 Internship

 

 

 

 

Biomedical Engineering (BME)

BE/MS Degree

BME undergraduate students may be eligible to enroll in the BE/MS degree starting in their senior year and pursue a Bachelor’s Degree along with a MS in Biomedical Engineering. Important features of this combined degree program are that students must apply to the program through the BME Graduate Program Director during their junior year, and once accepted, they are considered to be a graduate student in all regards.

Chemical and Molecular Engineering (CME)

Requirements for the major

4. Chemical Engineering
CME 101 Introduction to Chemical and Molecular Engineering
CME 304, 314 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I, II
CME 312 Material and Energy Balance
CME 315 Numerical Methods for Chemical Engineering Analysis
CME 318 Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics
CME 322 Chemical Engineering Heat and Mass Transfer
CME 323 Reaction Engineering and Chemical Kinetics
CME 330 Principles of Engineering for Chemical Engineers
CME 333 Business Economics for Engineers
CME 401 Separation Technologies
CME 310, 320, 410, 420 Chemical Engineering Laboratory I, II, III, IV
CME 427 Molecular Modeling for Chemical Engineers or 300-level BUS course
CME 440, 441 Process Engineering and Design I, II

Specializations

C.   Polymer Science

Provides a foundation in the properties of polymers, spectroscopy of organic compounds, polymer synthesis, and polymer processing for students interested in pursuing research in major laboratories or in academia.
CME 369 Polymer Engineering
CME 371 Biomedical Polymers
CME 470 Polymer Synthesis
CME 480 Cellular Biology for Chemical Engineers
CME 481 Advanced Cell Biology for Chemical Engineers

D.   Tissue Engineering

Recommended for students who are interested in the biochemical foundations of cellular function and the design of materials scaffolds for tissue engineering. It is also recommended for students interested in drug delivery systems and premedical or pharma­cological professions.

The following courses can be used to satisfy the CME Tissue Engineering Specialization:
BIO 202-E  Fundamentals of Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology or BIO 203-E  Fundamentals of Biology: Cellular and Organ Physiology
BME 404 Essentials of Tissue Engineering

Any TWO of the following courses:
CHE 346  Biomolecular Structure and Reactivity
CME 371  Biomedical Polymers
BIO 210-E  Human Physiology
BIO 310  Cell Biology
BIO 311  Techniques in Molecular and Cellular Biology
BIO 328  Mammalian Physiology
BIO 335  Animal Physiology Laboratory
BIO 317  Principles of Cellular Signaling
BIO 318-H  Bioethics and Policy 
CME 481 Advanced Cell Biology for Chemical Engineers 

D.   Tissue Engineering

Recommended for students who are interested in the biochemical foundations of cellular function and the design of materials scaffolds for tissue engineering. It is also recommended for students interested in drug delivery systems and premedical or pharma­cological professions.

The following courses can be used to satisfy the CME Tissue Engineering Specialization:
BIO 202-E  Fundamentals of Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology or BIO 203-E  Fundamentals of Biology: Cellular and Organ Physiology
BME 404 Essentials of Tissue Engineering

Any TWO of the following courses:
CHE 346  Biomolecular Structure and Reactivity
CME 371  Biomedical Polymers
BIO 210-E  Human Physiology
BIO 310  Cell Biology
BIO 311  Techniques in Molecular and Cellular Biology
BIO 328  Mammalian Physiology
BIO 335  Animal Physiology Laboratory
BIO 317  Principles of Cellular Signaling
BIO 318-H  Bioethics and Policy 
CME 481 Advanced Cell Biology for Chemical Engineers

Child and Family Studies (CFS)

One of the following courses may be  substituted for a CFS or SSE course in requirement B:
AFS 370 African-American Family
ANT 354 Family, Kinship and Marriage
ANT 372 Family, Marriage and Kinship in China
HAN 447 Children with Disabilities
HAN 443 Aging and Disability
LHD 402 Parenting Children in the Next Generation
LIN 330 Language Acquisition
LIN 344 Literacy Development

PSY 325 Children's Cognitive Development
PSY 326 Children's Social and Emotional Development
PSY 329 Special Topics in Developmental Psychology
PSY 334 Autism and Mental Retardation
PSY 338 Behavior Deviation in Children
PSY 341 Psychology of Prejudice
PSY 365 The Psychology of Language
SOC 304 Sociology of the Family
SOC/WST 340 Sociology of Human Reproduction
SOC 384 Sociology of the Life Course
SOC 387 Sociology of Education
WST 377/PSY 347 Psychology of Women

Cinema and Cultural Studies (CCS)

Major requirements:

3. Digital Culture. One course from the following:

ARS/MUS/THR 317 Interactive Media, Performance, and Installation
ARS/MUS/THR 318 Movies: Shoot, Edit, Score
ARS 325 Theory and Practice of Digital Art: Print
ARS 326 Theory and Practice of Digital Art: Video
ARS 327 Web Art, Design, and Culture
ARS 425 Advanced Digital Arts
CCS 313 Television Studies
CCS 395 Digital Cultural Studies
CCS 396 Video and Computer Game History
CCS 397 Video and Computer Game Culture

MUS 300 Music, Technology, and Digital Culture
MUS 340 Introduction to Music Technology
MUS 437 Electronic Music

Minor Requirements

Completion of the minor requires 21 credits.

A. CCS 101 Introduction to Cinema and Cultural Studies or CCS 201 Writing about Culture
B. HUM 201 Film Genres or HUM 202 Film History
C. CCS 301 Theorizing Cinema and Culture
D. Two courses from the following:ARH 322, ARH 329, ARH 331, ARH 333, ARH 335, ARH 342, ARS/MUS/THR 317, ARS/ MUS/THR 318, ARS 325, ARS 326, ARS 327, ARS 425, MUS 300, MUS 340, MUS 347, CCS 313, CCS 395, CCS 396, CCS 397, CLT 361, CLT 362. CLT 363, CLT 391, CLT 392, CLT 393, CLT 394, MUS 300, MUS 340
E. Six credits from the following:CCS 311, CCS 312, CCS 390, CCS 391, CCS 392, CCS 393, CCS 394, CCS 401, CCS 487, CCS 488, CLT 335, HUS 390, SPN 420 

Completion of the minor requires 21 credits.

A. CCS 101 Introduction to Cinema and Cultural Studies or CCS 201 Writing about Culture
B. HUM 201 Film Genres or HUM 202 Film History
C. CCS 301 Theorizing Cinema and Culture
D. Two courses from the following:ARH 322, ARH 329, ARH 331, ARH 333, ARH 335, ARH 342, ARS/MUS/THR 317, ARS/ MUS/THR 318, ARS 325, ARS 326, ARS 327, ARS 425, MUS 300, MUS 340, MUS 347, CCS 313, CCS 395, CCS 396, CCS 397CLT 361, CLT 362. CLT 363, CLT 391, CLT 392, CLT 393, CLT 394, MUS 300, MUS 340
E. Six credits from the following:CCS 311, CCS 312, CCS 390, CCS 391, CCS 392, CCS 393, CCS 394, CCS 401, CCS 487, CCS 488, CLT 335, HUS 390, SPN 420

Comparative Literature (CLL)

Major Requirements

B. Background
Three courses beyond the introductory level, chosen from the following:
CLL 215, CLT 211, 212, 220, 266
or one course per designator from the following: EGL 200-level, FRN 395, 396, ITL 395, 396, GER 344, HUR 341,  JDH 261
or one of the following classical language courses: LAT 112 or SKT 112

Minor Requirements

B. Background
Two courses beyond the introductory level, chosen from the following:
CLL 215, CLT 211, CLT 212, CLT 220, CLT 266
or one course per designator from the following: EGL 200-level, FRN 395, 396, ITL 395, 396, GER 344, HUR 341,  JDH 261
or one of the following classical language courses: LAT 112 or SKT 112

Education and Teacher Certification 

The Professional Education Program offers programs to prepare students to become teachers of academic subjects in secondary schools (grades 7 through 12) and to become teachers of English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) in grades Pre-K through 12. Stony Brook's teacher certification programs are registered and approved by the New York State Education Department.

Students complete the requirements of either a Departmental major or an interdisciplinary major in addition to teacher certification. It is recommended that students consult their planned major department as early as the second semester of the freshman year but no later than the second semester of their sophomore year to determine if the major includes the teacher education option. It is necessary to apply for admission to the Professional Education Program and to obtain guidance from program coordinators in completing teacher education and departmental major requirements for a degree. Teacher Education programs are offered in the following subject areas:

1. Certification Grades 7 through 12:

    ‑English

    ‑Foreign Languages: French, German, Italian, and Spanish

    ‑Mathematics

    ‑Sciences: Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Physics (General Science 7-12 Extension Certification options are available for these programs)

    ‑Social Studies

2. Certification Grades Pre-K through 12:

    ‑Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Combined Bachelor's/Master's Degree Programs are also available. Prospective students should contact the director of the certification program that they are interested in for information about this enrollment option.

All graduate and five-year combined bachelor's/master's level program include 5-6 extension options (except for TESOL, which is a PreK-12 program) with the addition of CEE 601 and CEE 602.

All students seeking a certification and resulting NYS license in the teaching of a specific science (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, or Physics) at the adolescent level (Grades 7 to 12) can, by the completion of 18 credits in two or more sciences combined other than the primary science for which they are licensed, add a General Science Extension to their primary license. See your teacher preparation program director or academic advisor for additional information.

Engineering Science (ESG)

Bachelor of Engineering Degree/ Master of Science Degree Program

An engineering science student may apply at the beginning of the junior year for admission to this special program, which leads to a Bachelor of Engineering degree at the end of the fourth year and a Master of Science degree at the end of the fifth year. In the junior year, the student takes ESM 350, which is normally taken in the senior year, instead of ESM 335. In the senior year, a student takes ESM 513, to use in lieu of ESM 335, in the fall and another graduate course in the spring. In the fifth year, the student takes 24 credits. The advantage of this program over the regular M.S. program is that a student may start his or her M.S. in the senior year, and that he or she needs only 24 credits in the fifth year as opposed to 30 credits for a regular M.S. student. For details of the M.S. degree requirements, see the graduate program director.

Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)

Completion of the major requires approximately 110 credits.

2. Natural Sciences

PHY 131/133, 132/134 Classical Physics I, II and laboratories
CHE 131 General Chemistry I and laboratory
Note: The physics course sequence PHY 125, 126, 127 or 141, 142 is accepted in lieu of PHY 131/133, 132/134. (Students are advised to take PHY 127 before PHY 126.) CHE 141/ 143 or ESG 198 are accepted in lieu of CHE 131/ 133 .

6. Computer Science

CSE 114 Computer Science I
CSE 214 Computer Science II
CSE 219 Computer Science III
CSE 230 Intermediate Programming in C and C++ or ESE 224 Computer Techniques for Electronic Design II
ESE 333 Real-time Operating Systems or CSE 306: Operating Systems

Requirements for the Sequential B.E. Computer Engineering/M.S. Computer Engineering or Electrical Engineering Degrees

The intent of the sequential five-year Bachelor of Engineering in Computer Engineering and Master of Science in Electrical Engineering program is to prepare high-achieving and highly motivated undergraduate computer engineering students for either doctoral studies or a variety of advanced professional positions. Computer engineering students interested in the sequential program should apply through the undergraduate office of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The program is highly selective and is offered to the top 10 to 20 percent of the junior undergraduate class. Admission is based on academic performance (a major g.p.a. of at least 3.30) as well as undergraduate research and professional activities. The sequential program is as rigorous as the current B.E. and M.S. programs taken separately. The requirements for the sequential program are the same as the requirements for the B.E. and M.S. programs except that two 300-level electives in the B.E. program are substituted by two 500-level graduate courses. Therefore six graduate credits will be counted towards the undergraduate degree. Detailed guidelines and sample course sequences are provided by the Department.

Electrical Engineering (ESE)

Completion of the major requires approximately 100 credits.

2. Natural Sciences
PHY 131/133, 132/134 Classical Physics I, II and Laboratories
CHE 131 General Chemistry I and Laboratory
Note: The physics course sequence PHY 125, 126, 127 or 141, 142 is accepted in lieu of PHY 131/133, 132/134. (Students are advised to take PHY 127 before PHY 126.) The chemistry course sequence CHE 141/ 143 or ESG 198 are accepted in lieu of CHE 131/ 133.

Engineering Science (ESG)

Areas of Specialization

Civil Engineering Track:

1. Two required courses:

a. ESM 334 Materials Engineering

b. GEO/MAR 318 Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes or GEO 309 Structural Geology or MEC 364 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics

2. Three technical electives chosen from the following:

 -ARH 205-G Introduction to Architecture

 -ARH 324-G Architecture and Design of the 19th and 20th Centuries

 -ATM 345 Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Dynamics

 -ATM 348 Atmospheric Physics

 ‑CME 314 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II

 ‑CSE 391 Special Topics in Computer Science (Solid Modeling topic only)

 ‑CSE 325 Computers and Sculpture

 -ECO 329 Urban Economics

 -ECO 335 Economic Development

 -ECO 373-H Economics of Environment and Natural Resources

 -ESG 301-H Sustainability of the Long Island Pine Barrens

 -EST 330-H Natural Disasters: Societal Impacts and Technological Solutions

 -GEO 315 Groundwater Hydrology

 -GEO 316 Geochemistry of Surficial Processes

 -ISE 320 Information Management

 -MAR 392-H Waste Management Issues

 -MAR 393 Waste Treatment Technologies

 - MEC 262 Dynamics

 - MEC 305 Heat and Mass Transfer

 -MEC 350 Energy Conversion and Alternate Energy Technologies

 - MEC 363 Mechanics of Solids

 -MEC 381 Transport and Fate of Pollutants

 ‑ MEC 406 Energy Management in Commercial Buildings

 - MEC 455 Applied Stress Analysis

-A third course from 1. above

ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director

ESG 440, 441 Engineering Science Design III, IV (See Note)

EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

‑Note: ESG 440/441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

Environmental Engineering Track:

1. Two required courses:

ESM 212 Intro to Environmental Materials Engineering (or CME 318 Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics or MEC 364 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics or BME 305 Biofluids)

‑and CHE 312 Physical Chemistry Short Course (or CHE 301 Physical Chemistry I)

-CHE 312 Physical Chemistry

2. Three technical electives chosen from:

 -AMS 322 Groundwater Modeling

 -ATM 205-E Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences

 -ATM 247 Atmospheric Structure and Analysis

 -ATM 305-E Global Atmospheric Change

 -ATM 345 Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Dynamics

 -ATM 348 Atmospheric Physics

 ‑ ATM 397 Air Pollution and its Control

 - CHE 361 Nuclear Chemistry

 ‑ CHE 362 Nuclear Chemistry Laboratory

 ‑ CME 318 Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics or MEC 364 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics or BME 305 Biofluids may be taken as a technical elective if not taken as a required course

 ‑ CME 314 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II

 -ECO 373-H Economics of Environment and Natural Resources

 -ESG 301-H Sustainability of the Long Island Pine Barrens

 ‑ ESG 440 , 441 Engineering Science Design III, IV (See Note)

 - ESM 334 Materials Engineering

 ‑ ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director

 ‑ EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

 - ISE 320 Information Management

 -GEO 309 Structural Geology

 ‑ GEO 316 Geochemistry of Surficial Processes

 ‑GEO/ MAR 318 Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes

 ‑ MAR 301 Environmental Microbiology

 -MAR 315-H Conservation Biology and Marine Biodiversity

 -MAR 320 Limnology

 ‑ MAR 336 Marine Pollution

 -MAR 340-H Environmental Problems and Solutions

 -MAR 385 Principles of Fishery Biology and Management

 -MAR 392-H Waste Management Issues

 -MAR 393 Waste Treatment Technologies

 ‑ MAR 394 Environmental Toxicology and Public Health

 -MEC 350 Energy Conversion and Alternate Energy Technologies

 -MEC 381 Transport and Fate of Pollutants

‑Note: ESG 440/441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

English (EGL)

Requirements for the Major in English (EGL)

The major in English leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. Courses must be passed with a letter grade of C or better in order to satisfy Requirement A below.

Completion of the major requires 54 credits.

A. Study within the Area of the Major

  1. EGL 204 Literary Analysis and Argumentation (Prerequisite to all EGL 300 level courses.  Special accommodations will be made for transfer students and crosslisted courses)
  2. EGL 207 The English Language
  3. EGL 205 Survey of British Literature I
  4. Two survey courses from the following: 
    EGL 206 Survey of British Literature II
    EGL 217 American Literature I
    EGL 218 American Literature II
  5. EGL 200-level elective course
  6. EGL 301 Intensive Writing
  7. Two 300-level Pre-1800 courses
  8. EGL 300 -level course in American or Anglophone Literature
  9. Four courses from EGL 300-399

Notes on Section A:

  1. No English course below the 200 level may be used to fulfill English major requirements. In addition, the following courses may not be used for the English major: EGL 440, 441, 449, 450, 451, 452, 454, 475, 476, 488, 494, 495.
  2. At least 12 credits in EGL courses applied to the major in English must be earned in 300-level courses at Stony Brook.
  3. Of the eight 300-level required courses, only one may be EGL 385 , 396, or 387.

B. Study in Related Areas

  1. Foreign Language Requirement:
    *Six credits, or the equivalent of one year, of college study at the intermediate level, or one semester of study at the advanced level, or a passing grade on a challenge examination (see page 90 of this Bulletin) in the chosen language.
  2. Six credits of study of History at the 200-level or higher.

C. Upper-Division Writing Requirement: Satisfactory completion of EGL 301 with a grade of C or better.

The Honors Program in English

To be admitted into the Honors Program, students must have an overall GPA of at least 3.0 and a GPA in English courses of at least 3.5; they also must submit a sample paper evidencing an appropriate level of skill in literary analysis.  Honors students must maintain these grade point averages in order to remain in the program.  They will take three Honors Seminars, an Honors Practicum, and EGL 496 . 

Students should develop their plan for an Honors Thesis with an English faculty advisor, in consultation with the Honors Program Director.  Thesis topic must be approved by the Undergraduate Program Committee before the last week of the semester prior to the semester in which the student takes EGL 496.  The completed thesis will be evaluated by the thesis advisor, a member of the Undergraduate Program Committee, and a third reader. 

Honors Track students are required to take the following courses:

1.
EGL 204 : Literary Analysis and Argumentation
2. Four survey courses 
    A.
EGL 205 Survey of British Literature I (Required)
    B. Two of the following:
       
EGL 206 : Survey of British Literature II
       
EGL 217 : Survey of American Literature I
       
EGL 218 : Survey of American Literature II
    C. EGL 207: The English Language - formerly
EGL 380
3. One 200-level elective
4. Eight upper-division English courses
    A. EGL 301: Intensive Writing Course
    B. Two
EGL 300 -level electives
    C. Three Honors courses:
       
EGL 490 Honors, topic will vary
        EGL 491 Honors Literature before 1800
        EGL 492 Honors American Literature
    D.
EGL 496 : Senior Honors Project
    E. Honors Praticum: EGL 494 or 495 , for University upper-division credit only
Related courses:
5. Foreign Language: Six credits at the Intermediate level or beyond
6. History: Six credits at the Intermediate level or beyond

French (FRN)

Requirements for the Major

A. Concentration in Language and Literature
1. Required courses:
a. Language courses:
FRN 311 Conversation
FRN 312 Composition
FRN 313 French Vocabulary through Popular Culture
FRN 411 Phonetics and Diction
FRN 412 Stylistics
b. Literature courses:
FRN 395 Readings in French Literature: Analysis and Interpretation I
FRN 396 Readings in French Literature: Analysis and Interpretation II
2. Elective courses:
15 additional credits in FRN ­courses beyond FRN 395, 396, of which 12 credits must be in literature (Two courses from among HUF 211, 216, 219, and HUL 324 are also acceptable)
3. Upper-division writing requirement: See C below

B. Concentration in French and a Second Discipline
1. Required courses:
a. FRN 311 Conversation
b. FRN 312 Composition
c. FRN 313 French Vocabulary through Popular Culture
d. FRN 395, 396 Readings in French Literature: Analysis and Interpretation I, II
e. FRN 411 Phonetics and Diction
f. FRN 412 Stylistics 
g.  One course in French literature numbered 300 or higher
h. FRN 441 French Civilization or HUF 216 or HUF 219
i. One additional FRN or HUF course (Please note that no more than two HUF courses in total may count for the major or minor.)
2. Elective courses:
12 additional credits (nine of which must be 300-level or higher) to be chosen with the help of the designated advisor and approved by the Department. Students must choose a sequence of four courses in a department or program other than French (FRN or HUF).

Requirements for the Minor

A. Emphasis on Language
Required courses:
FRN 311 Conversation and Composition
FRN 312 Introduction to Stylistics
FRN 313 French Vocabulary through Popular Culture
FRN 395 or 396 Readings in French Literature I or II
FRN 410 Business French (See Note)
FRN 411 Phonetics and Diction
FRN 412 Stylistics
Note: A French literature course or FRN 441 or HUL 324 may be substituted for FRN 410 

History

Requirements for the Minor

The minor is organized around o ne particular area of history (of the student’s choice), defined either by geography (e.g., United States, Latin America) or topic (e.g., imperialism, social change). Courses offered for the minor must be taken for a letter grade. All courses offered for the minor must be passed with a grade of C or higher. 

Humanities (HUM)

B. Introductory Coursework
Twelve credits of introductory coursework (four courses numbered in the 100s or 200s) chosen from three of the following five areas:
1. Literature and Culture (CLL, CLS, CLT, EGL, HUF, HUG, HUI, HUM, HUR and other courses in literatures and cultures)
2. Cinema and Cultural Studies (CCS and courses which apply to the CCS minor)
3. Fine Arts: Art History (ARH), Digital Arts (DIA), Music (MUS), Theatre Arts (THR)
4. History (HIS)
5. Philosophy (PHI)

D. Advanced Studies by Epoch
Twenty-four upper-division credits (seven courses numbered 300 or higher) in courses with the listed designators, to be distributed as follows:
• Three courses in two of the following epochs
• Two courses chosen from a third epoch
1. Ancient Worlds
[AAS, ANT, ARH, CLS, CLT, EGL, HIS, JDH, JDS, LAT, PHI, RLS]
2. The Middle Ages
[AAS, ARH, CLT, EGL, FRN, GER, HIS, ITL, LAT, MUS, MVL, PHI, RLS, RUS, SPN]
3. The Renaissance
[AAS, ARH, CLT, EGL, FRN, GER, HIS, ITL, MUS, PHI, RUS, SPN, THR]
4. Neoclassicism and Enlightenment
[AAS, ARH, CLT, EGL, FRN, GER, HIS, ITL, MUS, PHI, RUS, SPN]
5. Nineteenth-Century Frameworks
[AAS, AFS, AMR, ARH, CLT, EGL, FRN, GER, HIS, ITL, MUS, PHI, RUS, SPN
6. Modern and Postmodern Societies and Cultures
[AAS, AFS, ARH, CCS, CLT, DIA, EGL, FRN, GER, HIS, ITL, HUF, HUG, HUI, HUM, HUR, JDH, JDS, MUS, PHI, RLS, RUS, SPN, THR]

Linguistics (LIN)

Completion of the major requires 36 credits in linguistics and one year of a foreign language in addition to the Uni­versity's entry skill requirement.

1. LIN 201 Phonetics
2. LIN 211 Syntax
3. LIN 301 Phonology
4. LIN 431 The Structure of an Uncommonly Taught Language
5. Seven additional linguistics courses, of which at least six must be upper division (LIN 344 may not be used as one of these courses)
6. Two semesters of foreign language  after completing Entry Skill 3, the University's foreign language requirement. These may be either in the same language with which the entry skill was met or in one or two other languages.
7. Upper-Division Writing Requirement: In the junior or senior year, students must successfully complete LIN 300 Writing in Linguistics, a one-credit course. 

Completion of the major requires 36 credits in linguistics and one year of a foreign language in addition to the Uni­versity's entry skill requirement.

1. LIN 201 Phonetics
2. LIN 211 Syntax
3. LIN 301 Phonology
4. LIN 431 The Structure of an Uncommonly Taught Language
5. Seven additional linguistics courses, of which at least six must be upper division ( LIN 344 may not be used as one of these courses)
6. Two semesters of foreign language  after completing Entry Skill 3, the University's foreign language requirement. These may be either in the same language with which the entry skill was met or in one or two other languages.
7. Upper-Division Writing Requirement: In the junior or senior year, students must successfully complete LIN 300 Writing in Linguistics, a one-credit course.

Sophomore Fall Credits Spring Credits
LIN 307 3 LIN 356 3
LIN 201 4 LIN 301 3
LIN 345 3 Foreign language 212 3
Foreign language 211 3 D.E.C. 9
D.E.C. 3    
Total 17 Total 18

Music (MUS)

Music (MUS) and Jazz Music (JAZ)

The undergraduate major in music balances studies in the performance, composition, theory, and history of Western art music with the broad general education implied by a liberal arts degree. The department offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music with no specific "tracks" in performance, history, composition, or theory. All students take the same general program and are encouraged to select electives that reflect their individual interests and potential careers.

Students graduating with a major in Music pursue graduate study in musical performance, composition, history, and theory; teach music in private and public schools; take jobs in arts-related industries; and pursue advanced study in non-music fields.

A. Study within the Area of the Major

1. Theory:
MUS 121 Musicianship I
MUS 122 Beginning Keyboard
MUS 141, MUS 142 Keyboard Harmony A, B
MUS 220, MUS 221 Musicianship II, III 
MUS 321, MUS 322 Tonal Harmony I, II
MUS 323 Techniques of Music, 1880 to the Present 
MUS 331 Musicianship IV
MUS 421 Analysis of Tonal Music
MUS 422 Analysis of Post-Tonal Music

2. History and Literature:
MUS 130 Sound Structures  
MUS 350 Western Music before 1600
MUS 351 Western Music, 1600-1830
MUS 352 Western Music from 1830 to the Present 
One additional history course numbered 450 plus one other elective selected from the following: MUS 340, MUS 341, MUS 38, MUS 432, MUS 434, MUS 437, MUS 439, MUS 491

3. Study of Individual Instrument or Voice:
a. A minimum of four semesters from courses in the series
MUS 161 -MUS 187 Performance Study (2 credits each) or MUS 361 -MUS 387 Advanced Performance Study (4 credits each). 


b. Mandatory co-registration in a performance ensemble for each semester of lessons.  Instrumentalists should enroll in
MUS 262 University Orchestra, MUS 263 University Wind Ensemble, or MUS 264 Jazz Ensemble. Singers should enroll in MUS 261 Stony Brook Chorale.  Pianists and guitarists should enroll in MUS 391 Chamber Music.

Note: No more than 30 credits of individual instruction in instrument or voice may be included in the 120 credits required for the B.A. degree.

 Requirements for the minor in Jazz Music

The General Track is designed for students who are interested in jazz but who do not seek training in more sophisticated aspects of music theory and musicianship.  The Theory Track, for which students take music major courses in theory and musicianship, is for students who want to acquire more specialized knowledge and skills in the areas of music theory and musicianship.

Physics (PHY)

Specialization in Optics

Students majoring in Physics may decide to pursue a specialization in Optics. This specialization is listed on the official transcript.

In addition to the courses required for the major, students must complete the following with a grade of C or better to satisfy the requirements of the specialization:

A. Required Departmental Courses (6 credits)
      PHY 302 Electricity and Magnetism II
      PHY 452 Lasers

Fall 2009 Updates

Applied Math and Statistics (AMS)

Acceptance into the Applied Mathematics and Statistics Major

Qualified freshman and transfer students who have indicated their interest in the major on their applications are accepted directly into the major upon admission to the University. Students who did not apply for the major and those who were not accepted into the major when they entered the University may apply directly to the Department only after completion of AMS 161 or MAT 132 or 142 or 127; AMS 210 or MAT 211; and CSE 110 or 114 or 130 or ESG 111 or MEC 111 or MEC 112.

Requirements for the Major in Applied Mathematics and

Statistics (AMS)

The major in Applied Mathematics

and Statistics leads to the Bachelor

of Science degree.

Completion of the major requires approximately 60 credits.

A.        Study Within the Area of the Major

            1.         AMS 151, 161 Applied Calculus I, II

                        AMS 210 or MAT 211 Applied Linear Algebra

                        AMS 261 or MAT 203 or MAT 205

                        Applied Calculus III

                        Note: The following alternate

calculus course sequences may be substituted for AMS 151, 161 in major requirements or prerequisites:

                                    MAT 125, 126, 127

                                    or MAT 131, 132

                                    or MAT 141, 142

                                    or MAT 171

            2.         CSE 110 Introduction to Computer Science

                        or CSE 114 Computer Science I

                        or CSE 130 Introduction to Programming in C

                        or ESG 111 C Programming for Engineering

                         or MEC 111

                        or MEC 112 Practical C/C++ for Scientists and Engineers

 

Atmospheric Sciences (ATM)

Honors Program in Atmospheric Sciences

Graduation with departmental honors in Atmospheric Sciences requires the following:

1. Students are eligible to participate in the Honors Program if they have a 3.50 GPA in all courses for the major by the end of the junior year. Students should apply to the SoMAS undergraduate director for permission to participate.

2. Students must prepare an honors thesis based on a research project written in the form of a paper for a scientific journal. A student interested in becoming a candidate for honors should submit an outline of the proposed thesis research project to the SoMAS undergraduate director as early as possible, but no later than the second week of classes in the last semester. The student will be given an oral examination in May on his or her research by his or her research supervisor and the undergraduate research committee. The awarding of honors requires the recommendation of this committee and recognizes superior performance in research and scholarly endeavors. The written thesis must be submitted before the end of the semester in which the student is graduating.

3. If the student maintains a GPA of 3.5 in all courses in their major through senior year and receives a recommendation by the undergraduate research committee, he or she will receive departmental honors. 

Computer Science (CSE)

Specialization in Game Programming

The specialization in game programming prepares students for a career as either a professional game developer or researcher. Game graphics and multiplayer network programming techniques are stressed. The specialization also emphasizes original game development, game design methodology, and team projects and presentations. It requires four core courses, two electives, and a project. Students may declare their participation in the specialization after completing the courses in 1a and 1b. All courses must be completed with a grade of C or higher.

1. Core Courses

            a. CSE 306 Operating Systems

            b. CSE 310 Data Communication and Networks or CSE 346 Computer Communications

            c. CSE 328 Fundamentals of Computer Graphics

            d. CSE 380 Computer Game Programming

            e. CSE 381 Advanced Game Programming

2.         Two electives from the following:

                        CSE 304 Compiler Design

                        CSE 320 Computer Architecture

                        CSE 334 Introduction to Multimedia Systems

                        CSE 352 Artificial Intelligence

                        CSE 355 Computational Geometry

                        CSE 364 Advanced Multimedia Techniques

                        CSE 375 Concurrency

                        CSE 408 Network Security

3. Project

                        Completion of CSE 487 Research in Computer Science or CSE 488 Internship in Computer Science or CSE 495/496  Senior Honors Research Project I, II, on a topic in game programming.

Note:  Students specializing in Game Programming are encouraged to complete the natural science sequence in physics, see part seven (7) of the Requirements for the Major in Computer Science.

Requirements for the Minor in Computer Science (CSE)

The minor in Computer Science is open to all students not majoring in either Computer Science or Information Systems or minoring in Information Systems. To declare the minor in Computer Science, students must complete CSE 114 and either CSE 214 or CSE 21 5 with grades of C or higher. The minor requires seven CSE courses totaling

22 to 24 credits as outlined below.

Dance (DAN)

The dance minor has been reactivated.

Earth and Space Sciences (ESS)

Requirements for the Earth and Space Sciences Track

C. Introductory related science courses

            1.         MAT 131, 132 Calculus I, II

(See Notes 1 to 3 below)

            2.         PHY 121/123 Physics for Life Sciences

or PHY 125 Classical Physics A

or PHY 131/133 Classical Physics I and lab

or PHY 141 Classical Physics I: Honors

            3.         Any two of the following groups:

                        a.         PHY 122/124 Physics for Life Sciences (see Note 3)

or PHY 132/134 Classical Physics II and lab

or PHY 142 Classical Physics II: Honors

or PHY 126, 127 Classical Physics B and C

                        b.         CHE 131 (129), 132 General Chemistry I, II or CHE 141, 142 Honors Chemistry I, II (See Note 3)

                        c.         BIO 201 Fundamentals of Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems

and BIO 204 Fundamentals of Scientific Inquiry in the Biological Sciences I (see Note)

Note: Students who choose to take BIO 201/204 as an option are required to take CHE 131 or 141 instead of a second semester of Physics.

Requirements for the Earth Science Education Track

A. Introductory science courses

                        GEO 102 The Earth and GEO 112 Physical Geology

                        GEO 103 The Earth Through Time and GEO 113 Historical Geology Laboratory

                        AST 101 Introduction to Astronomy and AST 112 Astronomy Laboratory

                        ATM 205 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences

                        BIO 201 Fundamentals of Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems

                        BIO 202 Fundamentals of Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology

                        BIO 204 Fundamentals of Scientific Inquiry in the Biological Sciences I

                        CHE 131, 132 General Chemistry I and II (see note below)

                        CHE 133, 134 General Chemistry Laboratory I and II

                        AMS 102 Elements of Statistics

                        MAT 125 Calculus A

                        PHY 119 Physics for Environmental Studies

or PHY 125 Classical Physics A

                        ATM 102 Weather and Climate

Environmental Studies (ENS)

Honors Program in Environmental Studies

Graduation with departmental honors in Environmental Studies requires the following:

1. Students are eligible to participate in the Honors Program if they have a 3.50 GPA in all courses for the major by the end of the junior year. Students should apply to the SoMAS undergraduate director for permission to participate.

2. Students must prepare an honors thesis based on a research project written in the form of a paper for a scientific journal. A student interested in becoming a candidate for honors should submit an outline of the proposed thesis research project to the SoMAS undergraduate director as early as possible, but no later than the second week of classes in the last semester. The student will be given an oral examination in May on his or her research by his or her research supervisor and the undergraduate research committee. The awarding of honors requires the recommendation of this committee and recognizes superior performance in research and scholarly endeavors. The written thesis must be submitted before the end of the semester in which the student is graduating.

3. If the student maintains a GPA of 3.5 in all courses in their major through senior year and receives a recommendation by the undergraduate research committee, he or she will receive departmental honors.

Engineering Sciences (ESG)

Sample Course Sequence for the

Major in Engineering Science

Sophomore Fall           Credits

AMS 261        4

ESE 271          4

MEC 260        3

ESG 217#       3

ESG 302#       4

Total    18

Spring  Credits

AMS 361        4

ESG 281         4

D.E.C. 3

D.E.C. 3

Total    14

Junior Fall       Credits

ESG 312# and 300     3

D.E.C. 3

ESG 332#       4

ESG 333         4

D.E.C. 3

Total    17

Spring  Credits

ESM 335         4

ESM 336         3

ESG 339         4

ESG 316         4

Technical elective#      3

Total    17

Civil Engineering Track:

1.         Two required courses:

            a. ESM 334 Materials Engineering

            b. GEO/MAR 318 Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes

or GEO 309 Structural Geology

or MEC 364 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics

2. Three technical electives chosen from the following:

                        CME 314 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II

                        CSE 391 Special Topics in Computer Science (Solid Modeling topic only)

                        CSE 325 Computers and Sculpture

                        GEO 315 Groundwater Hydrology

                        ISE 320 Information Management

                        MEC 262 Dynamics

                        MEC 305 Heat and Mass Transfer

                        MEC 363 Mechanics of Solids

                        MEC 406 Energy Management in Commercial Buildings

                        MEC 455 Applied Stress Analysis

                        A third course from 1. above

                        ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits)

or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits)

or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director

                        ESG 440, 441 Engineering Science Design III, IV (See Note)

                        EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

            Note: ESG 440/441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

Materials Science and Engineering

This specialization provides the oppor­tunity for in-depth study of the relationship between performance-properties-

processing in materials engineering

and its applications.

1.         One of the following two-course design sequences:

            a.         ESM 334 Materials Engineering

and ESM 335 Strength of Materials

            b.         MEC 310 Introduction to Machine Design and MEC 410 Design of Machine Elements

            c.         MEC 305 Heat and Mass Transfer and MEC 364 Introduction to

Fluid Mechanics

            d.         ESE 218 Digital Systems Design and ESE 380 Embedded Micro­processor Systems Design I

            e.         ESE 305  Deterministic Signals

and Systems and ESE 315  Control System Design

2.         Three courses from the following:

                        CME 315 Numerical Methods

                        CME 327 Molecular Modeling

                        ESM 325 Diffraction Techniques and Structure of Solids

                        ESM 353 Biomaterials: Manufacture, Properties, and Applications

                        ESM 369 Polymer Engineering

                        ESM 475 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum

                        ESG 440/441 Engineering Science Design III/IV (See Note)

                        EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

            Note: Three credits of research (ESM 499 or 488) may be used as a technical elective with permission of the undergraduate program director.

            Note: ESG 440/441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

This specialization addresses the rapidly changing technology in the mechanical engineering and manufacturing industries that requires a highly educated workforce with knowledge of mechanical properties of materials, materials processing, design, thermodynamics, statistics, and analysis.

1.         One of the following two-course design sequences:

            a.         MEC 310 Introduction to Machine Design and MEC 410 Design of Machine Elements

            b.         ESM 334 Materials Engineering and ESM 335 Strength of Materials

2.         MEC 363 Mechanics of Solids

3.         Two courses from the following:

                        AMS 310 Survey of Probability and Statistics

                        CSE 391 Special Topics in Computer Science (Solid Modeling topic only)

                        CSE 325 Computers and Sculpture

                        MEC 262 Dynamics

                        MEC 325 Manufacturing Processes

                        MEC 364 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics

                        MEC 381 Transport and Fate of Pollutants

                        MEC 393 Engineering Fluid Mechanics

                        MEC 398 Thermodynamics II

                        MEC 402 Mechanical Vibrations

                        MEC 411 Control System Analysis and Design

                        MEC 420 Turbomachinery and Applications

                        MEC 422 Thermal System Design

                        MEC 455 Applied Stress Analysis

                        ESG 440/441 Engineering Science Design III/IV (See Note)

                        EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

Nanoscale Engineering

The creation of functional materials

and devices which involves controllable processes and transformations at the scale of billionths of a meter promises to become a major focus of future efforts in both engineering and scientific research. With a thorough background in materials science, engineering design, and surface and molecular chemistry and de­vices, this specialization prepares students for graduate study, as well as professional positions in materials and process engineering and research and development.

1.         Two required courses:

            a. ESM 213 Studies in                                                Nanotechnology

            b. ESM 334 Materials Engineering

2. Three technical electives chosen from:

                        ESM 369 Polymer Engineering

                        CHE 301 Physical Chemistry I

                        CHE 302 Physical Chemistry II

                        CHE 321 Organic Chemistry I

                        CHE 322 Organic Chemistry II

                        CHE 345 Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

                        CME 315 Numerical Methods

                        CME 327 Molecular Modeling

                        BME 381 Nanofabrication in Biomedical Applications

                        ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits)

or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits)

or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director

                        ESG 440, 441 Engineering Science Design III, IV (see Note)

                        EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

Marine Sciences (MAR)

Honors Program in Marine Sciences

Graduation with departmental honors in Marine Sciences requires the following:

1. Students are eligible to participate in the Honors Program if they have a 3.50 GPA in all courses for the major by the end of the junior year. Students should apply to the SoMAS undergraduate director for permission to participate.

2. Students must prepare an honors thesis based on a research project written in the form of a paper for a scientific journal. A student interested in becoming a candidate for honors should submit an outline of the proposed thesis research project to the SoMAS undergraduate director as early as possible, but no later than the second week of classes in the last semester. The student will be given an oral examination in May on his or her research by his or her research supervisor and the undergraduate research committee. The awarding of honors requires the recommendation of this committee and recognizes superior performance in research and scholarly endeavors. The written thesis must be submitted before the end of the semester in which the student is graduating.

3. If the student maintains a GPA of 3.5 in all courses in their major through senior year and receives a recommendation by the undergraduate research committee, he or she will receive departmental honors.

Marine Vertebrate Biology (MVB)

Honors Program in Marine Vertebrate Biology

Graduation with departmental honors in Marine Vertebrate Biology requires the following:

1. Students are eligible to participate in the Honors Program if they have a 3.50 GPA in all courses for the major by the end of the junior year. Students should apply to the SoMAS undergraduate director for permission to participate.

2. Students must prepare an honors thesis based on a research project written in the form of a paper for a scientific journal. A student interested in becoming a candidate for honors should submit an outline of the proposed thesis research project to the SoMAS undergraduate director as early as possible, but no later than the second week of classes in the last semester. The student will be given an oral examination in May on his or her research by his or her research supervisor and the undergraduate research committee. The awarding of honors requires the recommendation of this committee and recognizes superior performance in research and scholarly endeavors. The written thesis must be submitted before the end of the semester in which the student is graduating.

3. If the student maintains a GPA of 3.5 in all courses in their major through senior year and receives a recommendation by the undergraduate research committee, he or she will receive departmental honors.

Religious Studies (RLS)

Requirements for the Major in Religious Studies (RLS)

A.        Required Courses

            RLS 301 Sources and Methods (ordinarily taken in the fall of the junior year; may be taken in the senior year by those who do not meet the prerequisites as juniors)

            RLS 400 Religious Studies Seminar (ordinarily taken in the spring of the senior year)

Requirements for the Minor in Religious Studies (RLS)

            1. RLS 101 or AAS/RLS 102 or one 200 level RLS course

            2. One 200-level RLS course

            3. RLS 301

            4. At least three courses in one of the area emphases listed for the major

Technological Systems Management (TSM)

Sample Course Sequence for the Major in Technological Systems Management

Sophomore Fall           Credits

EST Elective   3

D.E.C. 3

EST 202          3

D.E.C. B         3

Specialization course   3

Total    15

Spring  Credits

EST 305          3

EST 392          3

Specialization course   3

Elective           3

Elective           3

Total    15

Junior Fall       Credits

EST 326          3

EST 391 (D.E.C. H)   3

Specialization course   3

EST elective    3

D.E.C. 3

Total    15

Spring  Credits

EST 327          3

EST 393          3

Specialization course   3

EST Elective   3

EST Elective   3

Total    15

Requirements for the Major in Technological Systems Management (TSM)

Students must complete a specialization in one of the following: natural science, engi­neering and applied science, or environmental studies. (For those students who have a major in one of those areas and who pursue Technological Systems Management as a second major, the first major will serve as the specialization.)

Completion of the major requires approximately 79 credits.

A. Mathematics

            AMS 151, 161 Applied Calculus I, II

            Note: The following alternate calculus course sequences may be substituted for AMS 151, 161:

                        MAT 125, 126, 127

                        or MAT 131, 132

                        or MAT 141, 142

                        or MAT 171

B. Natural Sciences

            One of the following sequences:

            1. PHY 131/133 and PHY 132/134  Classical Physics I, II and Laboratories

                        Note: The following alternate physics course sequences may be substituted for PHY 131/133 and 132/134:

                                    PHY 121/123 and 122/124

                                    or PHY 125, 126, 127

                                    or PHY 141, 142

            2. BIO 150 The Living World

and BIO 201 Fundamentals of Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems

            3. CHE 131, 132/133 General Chemistry I, II  and lab

or CHE 141, 142/143 Honors Chemistry I, II and Laboratories

            4. GEO 102, 112 The Earth/Physical Geology Lab

and one of the following:

                        GEO 304 Energy, Mineral Resources and the Environment

                        GEO 311 Structural Geology

            5. BIO 201 Principles of Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems

and one of the following:

                        GEO 101 Environmental Geology

                        MAR 104 Oceanography

                        ATM 102 Weather and Climate

                        ENS 101 Prospects for Planet Earth

C.        Study in Related Areas: Specialization

            A cluster of seven related courses, totaling at least 21 credits, in one area of natural science, engineering, applied science, or environmental studies from a single department or program. At least three courses, totaling at least nine credits, must be at the 300 or 400 level, or equivalent as approved by the undergraduate program director.

D. Technological Systems Management

            1. Required courses (11)

                        EST 192 Introduction to Modern Engineering

                        EST 194 Patterns of Problem Solving

                        EST 202 Introduction to Science, Technology, and Society Studies

                        EST 305 Applications Software for Information Management

                        EST 326 Management for Engineers

                        EST 327 Marketing for Engineers

                        EST 391 Technology Assessment

                        EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

                        EST 393 Project Management

                        EST 440 Interdisciplinary Research Methods

                        EST 441 Interdisciplinary Senior Project 

            2. Electives

                        EST 213 Studies in Nanotechnology

                        EST 304 Communication for Engineers and Scientists

                        EST 310 Design of Computer Games

                        EST 320 Communication Technology Systems

                        EST 323 Human Computer Interaction

                        EST 331 Ethics and Intellectual Property

                        EST 341 Treatment Technologies

                        EST 488 Internship in Technology and Society

Note: Students make take other 300 or 400 level courses in their area of specialization with the approval of the undergraduate program director.

Theatre Arts (THR)

Requirements for the Major in Theatre Arts (THR)

The major in Theatre Arts leads to

the Bachelor of Arts degree. All courses offered for the major in theatre arts

must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher.

Completion of the major requires

48 credits.

A. Theatre Arts Core Program

            1. Two of the following courses:

                        THR 105 Acting I

                        THR 117 Media: Analysis and Culture

                        DAN 164 Tap Technique and History

or DAN 165 Contemporary Dance I

or DAN 166 Ballet Technique I

or DAN 167 Jazz Dance Technique I or DAN 264 Movement Awareness

            and Analysis

            2. THR 115 Stagecraft I

            3. THR 116 Stagecraft II

            4. THR 104 Play Analysis

            5. THR 216 Introduction to Visual Interpretation

            6. THR 315 European Theatre and Drama: The Classical Era

or THR 316 European Theatre and Drama: The Modern Era

            7. THR 312 American Theatre and Drama

            8. THR 313 Asian Theatre and Drama

            9. Two of the following:

THR 320 Production I

            THR 321 Production II

            THR 307 Performance Laboratory

            10. One of the following two courses:

THR 401 Senior Seminar

THR 488 Internship

Science and Engineering (LSE)

Requirements for the Minor in Science and Engineering (LSE)

Before declaring the Science and Engine­ering minor, each student should plan his or her program in consultation with the director of the minor. All courses for the minor must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher.

Completion of the minor requires

19 credits.

1.         All of the following minor courses:

            LSE 201 Opportunities in Science and Engineering

            LSE 310 Current issues in Science and Engineering

            LSE 320 Future Trends in Science and Engineering

2.         Two introductory science courses from the list of department designators below. Courses must not be from the same department. (See notes 2 and 4.)

                        Astronomy (AST)

                        Atmospheric Sciences (ATM)

                        Biology (BIO)

                        Chemistry (CHE)

                        Geosciences (GEO)

                        Marine Sciences (MAR)

                        Physics (PHY)

3.         One introductory engineering or applied science course from the list

of department designators below.

(See notes 3 and 4.)

                        Biomedical Engineering (BME)

                        Chemical and Molecular Engineering (CME)

                        Computer Science and Information Systems (CSE/ISE)

                        Electrical and Computer Engineering (ESE)

                        Engineering Science (ESG)

                        Materials Science (ESM)

                        Mechanical Engineering (MEC)

4.         Any 300-level 3 credit EST course or ARS 208.

Technical Leadership (LTL)

Requirements for the Minor in Technical Leadership (LTL)

The minor consists of:

1. LSE 201 Opportunities in Science and Engineering (1 credit)

2. One course from the following:

            EST 304 Communications for Engineers and Scientists

            ESE 300 Technical Communication for Electrical and Computer Engineers (for Electrical and Computer Engineering majors only)

            EST 303 Crisis Communications

            JRN 101 or JRN 103 News Literacy

Note: EST 303 or EST 304 may not be used to satisfy requirement 5 if used for this requirement

3.  BUS 111 Introduction to Business

for Non-Business Majors or BUS 115 Introduction to Business for Business Majors

4. Any introductory 3 credit computer programming course including CSE 102

5. Any 300-level 3 credit EST course or ARS 208

6. LSE 310-H: Issues in Science and Engineering

7. LSE 320-H: Future Trends in Science and Engineering