ANP: Biological Anthropology

ANP 120 ​- E: Introduction to Biological Anthropology

An introduction to the evolutionary study of humankind based on a survey of the diversity and evolutionary history of primates. The development of scientific and evolutionary thought and method. The biological basis of inheritance and variation. Human variations and adaptations in relation to the environment. Physical characteristics and behavior of living primates. Evolution of primates and current research on human origins. ANP 121 is the associated laboratory component of ANP 120.

3 credits

ANP 121: Biological Anthropology Laboratory

Laboratory exploration of the fundamentals of Biological Anthropology based on a survey of the diversity and evolutionary history of humans and nonhuman primates. The development of scientific and evolutionary thought and method. The biological basis of inheritance and variation. Human variations and adaptations in relation to the environment. Physical characteristics and behavior of living primates. Evolution of primates and current research on human origins. Two hours of laboratory per week during which students will experience the research process, methods, and skills, and learn to collaborate in formal inquiry. Not for credit in addition to ANP 120 as offered prior to Fall 2010.

Corequisite: ANP 120

1 credit

ANP 201 ​- E: Human Evolution

An overview of the evolution of the human lineage from its origins to the appearance of modern humans. Our evolutionary history involved some dramatic changes in anatomy and behavior, and we will explore both the significance of these changes, and the methods that scientists use interpret them. The human fossil record is abundant, and will be our central focus. Emphasis will be placed on how we learn things about the past, as well as what we know.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANP 120, GEO 102, GEO 103, GEO 109, or any BIO course

3 credits

ANP 220 ​- H: Controversies in Human Biology and Behavior

The study of controversially debated issues in the work of Physical Anthropologists. Surveys general aspects of primate and human behavior, human variation and adaptation, and the evolution of humans and human ancestors exploring previous and recent debates that have centered around issues such as for example the concept of evolution, gender roles and mating systems, role of aggression, and the role of hunting and gathering.

Advisory prerequisite: Introductory Anthropology or Biology course

3 credits

ANP 300 ​- E: Human Anatomy

An introduction to the structure of the human body considered from both systems and regional approaches. Subject matter includes the musculoskeletal, respiratory, nervous, cardiovascular, digestive, and urogenital systems, together with an appreciation of these systems in a regional anatomical context. Laboratory sessions entail examination of plastic models, exercises in living anatomy and computer "dissection." Instructor permission required to repeat ANP 300. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

Prerequisite: ANP 120 or one BIO course

4 credits

ANP 305: Vertebrate Paleontology of the Turkana Basin

Vertebrate fossils are important sources of information about the appearance, evolution, and extinction of major organisms. As such, they provide a valuable window into changes in climate and selection pressures, and organisms' diverse adaptive responses to these changes. They are also significant in placing hominid discoveries within a relative local chronology, and helping reconstruct environments associated with hominid finds. This course acquaints students with methods of vertebrate paleontology employed in different chronological contexts of the Turkana Basin, used to solve diverse theoretical questions.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANP 306: Paleoanthropological Discoveries of the Turkana Basin

The Turkana Basin is home to many paleoanthropological discoveries that fundamentally reshaped ideas about human evolution. Richard, Maeve, and Louise Leakey will share perspectives on eight of these finds, including Nariokotome ("Turkana boy") and KNM-WT1700 (the "Black Skull"). Lectures and readings for each discovery will cover: 1) the research questions and strategies that led to the find; 2) the kind of analyses that have yielded the most important interpretive conclusions about the find; 3) how this discovery reshaped views of the human past; and 4) what new directions it catalyzed in human evolution research. Class activities consist of lectures by the Leakeys, laboratory exercises (reconstructions, measurements) using casts of the 5 kinds, and field trips to discovery locations.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANP 321: Primate Evolution

The evolution of the order Primates from its origins to the appearance of the human family. Primate origins; the first primates of modern aspect; origins and adaptive radiations of monkeys; appearance and adaptations of apes and humans. Relevant topics in geology such as geochronology, paleogeography, taphonomy, and paleoecology.

Prerequisite: ANP 120

3 credits

ANP 325 ​- E: Primate Behavior

An introduction to primate social systems and the factors that influence their maintenance and evolution, including foraging strategy, demographic processes, mating and rearing strategies, conflicts and coalitions, and communication.

Prerequisite: ANP 120

3 credits

ANP 340: Field Methods in Biological Anthropology

Methods, problems, and experience in field techniques. The course focuses on field methods such as fossil excavation, reconstruction of skeletal and dental remains, anthropometry, craniometry, and field behavioral ecology of primates.

Prerequisites: ANP 120 or BIO 201 (as offered prior to fall 2007) or BIO 201 (as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204; permission of instructor

3-6 credits

ANP 350: Methods in Studying Primates

Introduction to the concepts and practical skills needed to conduct scientific work, particularly in the study of primates, including how to collect and analyze data focusing on habitat description, primate densities, use of space, and social interactions. Topics include design and presentation of research; ecological field methods; behavioral observations and other techniques. Students are required to plan a small research study and to present their proposal in class. Some computer work outside class required.

Prerequisite: ANP 120 or BIO 201 (as offered prior to fall 2007) or BIO 201 (as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204

3 credits

ANP 360 ​- H: Primate Conservation

Review of endangered species of primates and case histories of conservation programs in Asia, Africa, South America, and Madagascar, highlighting different problems and solutions.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANP 120 or BIO 201 (as offered prior to fall 2007) or BIO 201 (as offered beginning fall 2007) and BIO 204

3 credits

ANP 391: Topics in Biological Anthropology

Discussion of a topic of current interest in physical anthropology. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: ANP 120

Advisory prerequisite: One other ANP course

3 credits

ANP 403: Seminar in Biological Anthropology

Research and discussion of selected topics in physical anthropology. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

ANP 404: Human Osteology

A detailed study of the anatomy of the human skeleton with special emphasis on the interpretation of skeletal remains from archaeological contexts. Consideration is given to the growth, structure, and function of bones, and to forensic aspects such as the determination of age, sex, stature, and pathology from skeletal remains. Students conduct a research project on a human skeleton.

Prerequisites: ANP 300; permission of instructor

3 credits

ANP 447: Readings in Biological Anthropology

Individual advanced readings on selected topics in physical anthropology. May be repeated up to a limit of 6 credits.

Prerequisites: ANP 321 and 330; permission of instructor

3 credits

ANP 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; anthropology major; 3.00 g.p.a.; permission of instructor; permission of director of undergraduate studies

3 credits, S/U grading

ANP 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. The course in which the student is permitted to work as a teaching assistant must be different from the course in which he or she previously served. Not for major or minor credit.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; anthropology major; 3.00 g.p.a.; permission of instructor; permission of director of undergraduate studies

3 credits, S/U grading

ANP 487: Independent Research in Biological Anthropology

Independent research projects carried out by upper-division students. The student must propose the research project, carry it out, analyze the data, and submit the results in a written form acceptable to the sponsor. May be repeated up to a limit of six credits.

Prerequisites: Two 200- or 300-level ANP courses; permission of instructor and department

0-6 credits

ANP 488: Internship in Biological Anthropology

Participation in state, local, and national public and private agencies and organizations. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final written report on their experiences to the faculty sponsor and the department. May be repeated to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: 15 credits in anthropology; permission of instructor and department

0-6 credits, S/U grading

ANP 495: Senior Honors Project in Anthropology

First course of a two-semester project for anthropology majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. Arranged in consultation with the department through the director of undergraduate studies, the project involves independent readings or research and the writing of a paper under the close supervision of an appropriate faculty member on a suitable topic selected by the student. Students enrolled in ANP 495 are obliged to complete ANP 496 the following semester. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence ANP 495-496.

Prerequisite: Admission to the anthropology honors program

3 credits

ANP 496: Senior Honors Project in Anthropology

Second course of a two-semester project for anthropology majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. Arranged in consultation with the department through the director of undergraduate studies, the project involves independent readings or research and the writing of a paper under the close supervision of an appropriate faculty member on a suitable topic selected by the student. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence ANP 495-496.

Prerequisite: ANP 495; admission to the anthropology honors program

3 credits