Requirements for the Major and Minor in Journalism (JRN)

Transfer students

Transfer students may transfer up to 9 credits of equivalent journalism courses in which they have earned a C or better. Transfer courses will be evaluated individually for equivalency by the under­graduate director.

Requirements for the Major

The major in journalism leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. Students must complete each course with a letter grade of C or higher within required JRN courses. Students must also satisfy the upper-division writing requirement. Completion of the major requires 65 credits, including 47 credits in journalism and 18 credits in a multidisciplinary concentration. To satisfy all requirements, a student must earn a minimum of 127 credits to graduate with a degree in journalism.

Students must complete three developmental phases, with core requirements in each phase. In Phase I, Values and Skills, students will study basic skills and ethics, including news reporting and writing for print and broadcast. In Phase II, New Challenges, students will explore the changes sweeping the journalistic landscape (including journalism on the Internet) and choose from a menu of upper-division reporting and writing courses. In Phase III, Finding an Entry Point into the Profession, students will specialize in broadcast, print, or online journalism, and take advanced courses. In addition, students will complete a senior project in their area of specialty and then adapt it for two other media.

Grammar Immersion

To progress in the major and minor program, students must pass a grammar proficiency test as part of JRN 111, a grammar course that is co-requisite with JRN 110. The grammar course includes an eight-week immersion lab in grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure. In the ninth week, all students take a proficiency test. Those who pass are excused from the lab for the rest of the semester. All other students must continue attending the lab and will be required to take a second test on the last day of class. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Students must receive a Satisfactory grade in JRN 111 in order to continue in journalism skills courses.

Note: WRT 200 may be used as a substitute for JRN 111 in satisfying the major or minor requirements.

Note: All courses are not offered each semester. JRN 360 cannot be taken for credit in addition to JRN 364.

A. Phase I: Values and Skills
1. Students must complete the following six courses
JRN 101/JRN 103 News Literacy
JRN 110/JRN 111 News I: Basic Reporting and Writing/Writing Immersion Lab
JRN 210/JRN 211 News II: Advanced Reporting and Writing/Digital Photojournalism lab
JRN 220 Journalism Law and Ethics
JRN 288 On-Campus Internship
JRN 310 News III: Reporting, Writing and Production for Broadcast
2. Students must complete one of the following two courses:
JRN 108 The History and Future of the American Press
JRN 201 Journalism That Changed The World

B. Phase II: New Challenges
1. Students must complete the following three courses: JRN 301 Journalism 24/7
JRN 320 The Promise and Perils of Online Journalism
JRN 350 The Principles of Editing
2. Electives for Phase II. Students may choose two courses from group A, or one course from A and one course from group B.
Group A:
Students may choose up to two courses from this list:
JRN 330 Investigative and In-depth Journalism*
JRN 335 Reporting in New York City
JRN 337 Intro to Narrative Journalism
Group B:
If students have chosen one course from A, they may choose a course from this list.
JRN 331 Specialized Beat Reporting (Government)
JRN 332 Specialized Beat Reporting (Culture and Lifestyle)
JRN 333 Business Reporting
JRN 334 Science and Health Reporting
JRN 336 Sports Reporting

C. Phase III: An Entry Point into the Profession
Requirements: completion of the two courses in Group A, B, or C. All students must complete JRN 490.
Group A: For Print
JRN 360 Techniques of In-Depth Reporting*
JRN 361 News Editing and Presentation*
Group B: For Broadcast
JRN 370 Advanced Reporting, Writing and Production for Broadcast*
JRN 371 Television Production*
Group C: For Online
JRN 380 Advanced Editing and Presentation for the Web*
For all students:
JRN 490 Senior Project

D. Required JRN Electives
Students are required to select a minimum of four elective credits in Jour­nalism courses as part their major.

E. Multidisciplinary Concentrations
Majors must earn a minimum of 18 credits, including nine upper division credits, in one of the following four multidisciplinary concentrations. Students may add a course to a concentration or propose a new concentration with the permission of the undergraduate director. Specific multi-disciplinary concentrations and required courses are listed below. In lieu of a multidisciplinary concentration, students may elect to pursue a second major.

F. Upper-Division Writing Requirement
All students majoring in Journalism must submit two samples of their journalism course work (longer articles, term papers, or independent research projects) along with the instructor's written confirmation that the work demonstrates suitably advanced writing proficiency, to the director of undergraduate studies for evaluation by the end of the junior year. If this evaluation is satisfactory, the student will have fulfilled the upper-division writing requirement. If it is not, the student must fulfill the requirement before graduation.

Multidisciplinary Concentrations

Science and the Environment

Students study trends, acquire foundation knowledge, and get multiple perspectives on science and environmental issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. See Bulletin course descriptions for details and prerequisites. Note: All courses will not be offered each semester.
ATM 102 Weather and Climate
BIO 103 Introduction to Biotechnology
BIO 113 General Ecology
BIO 115 Evolution and Society
ECO 373 Economics of the Environment and Natural Resources
ENS 101 Prospects for Planet Earth
ENS 201 Contemporary Environmental Issues and Policies
ENS 312 Population, Technology and the Environment
ENS 333 Environmental Law
EST 291 Energy, Environment and People
EST 303 Crisis Communications
EST 330 Natural Disasters: Impacts and Solutions
GEO 101 Environmental Geology
GEO 311 Geoscience and Global Concerns
HIS 365 Environmental History of North America
HIS 399  Disease in American History
MAR 104 Oceanography
MAR 340 Environmental Problems and Solutions
SOC 344 Environmental Sociology

Diversity and Society

Students study trends and acquire knowledge, insights, historical context, and multiple perspectives on important societal issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. See Bulletin course descriptions for details and prerequisites. Note: All courses will not be offered each semester.

AAS 250 Languages and Cultures of Asian Americans
AFS 310 American Attitudes Toward Race
AFS 319 The Politics of Race
AFS 363 Blacks and Mass Media
AMR 102 Making American Identities
AMR 301 Ethnicity and Race in American History
CLT 235 American Pluralism in Film and Literature
HIS 277 The Modern Color Line
HIS 325 The Civil Rights Movement
HIS 327 Origins of American Society
HIS 374 Historical Perspectives on Gender Orientation
SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 302 American Society
SOC 303 Social Inequality
SOC 310 Ethnic and Race Relations
SOC 330 Media and Society

Public Affairs

Students study trends, acquire knowledge and historical context, and gain multiple perspectives on public policy issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. See Bulletin course descriptions for details and prerequisi­tes. Note: All courses will not be offered each semester.

ECO 108 Introduction to Economics
ECO 305 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
ECO 316 U.S. Class Structure and its Implications
ECO 360 Money and Banking
HIS 104 United States Since 1877
HIS 335 The Civil Rights Movement
HIS 378 War and the Military
POL 102 Intro to American Government
POL 317 American Election Campaigns
POL 318 Voters and Elections
POL 322 Law and Politics<
POL 325 Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
POL 332 Politics of Criminal Due Process
POL 359 Public Policy Analysis
POL 367 Mass Media in American Politics
SOC 200 Medicine and Society
SOC 338 The Sociology of Crime
CFS 405 Seminar in Children, Law and Social Policy

Global Issues and Perspectives

Students study trends, acquire knowledge and historical context, and gain multiple perspectives on global issues that will help them report insightfully in the future. See Bulletin course descriptions for details and prerequisites. Note: All courses will not be offered each semester.

AAS 201 Introduction to the Civilization of the Indian Subcontinent
AFS 346 Political and Social History of Africa
AMR 101 Local and Global: National Boundaries and World Systems
GEO 311 Geoscience and Global Concerns
HIS 227 Islamic Civilization
HIS 281 Global History and Geography
HIS 341 20th Century China
POL 101 World Politics
POL 214/HIS 214 Modern Latin America
POL 313 Problems of International Relations
POL 337/AFS 337 The Politics of Africa
POL 374 Global Issues in the United Nations
SOC 248 Social Problems in Global Perspective
SOC 348 Global Sociology
SOC 365 Introduction to African Society
SOC 364 Sociology of Latin America
SOC 386 State and Society in the Middle East

Requirements for the Minor

The journalism minor emphasizes knowledge and exposure to basic skills for students who seek an understanding of broadcast, online, and print media but who are not necessarily planning careers in journalism or intending to major in journalism. Courses in the minor provide students with a broad introduction to journalistic principles and practices as well as an understanding of the role of journalism in society. This program will be useful to students who are interested in sharpening their information-gathering and analytical skills, improving the speed and clarity of their writing, and improving their ability to communicate in whatever career they pursue.

Eighteen credits are required for the Minor in Journalism. Courses must be passed with a C or better to count toward the minor. Students are required to complete at least nine credits of upper-division journalism courses to complete the minor in journalism
Not all courses are offered each semester, so programs should be planned as early as possible. Prerequisites will be enforced.

Grammar Immersion

To progress in the minor program, students must pass a grammar proficiency test as part of JRN 111, a grammar course that is co-requisite with JRN 110. The grammar course includes an eight-week immersion lab in grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure. In the ninth week, all students take a proficiency test. Those who pass are excused from the lab for the rest of the semester. All other students must continue attending the lab and will be required to take a second test on the last day of class. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Students must receive a Satisfactory grade in JRN 111 in order to continue in journalism skills courses.
A. Courses required of all minors:
JRN 101/JRN 103 News Literacy
JRN 110/JRN 111 News I: Basic Reporting and Writing/Writing Immersion Lab
JRN 301 Journalism 24/7
B. Students must take one course from this list:
JRN 108 The History and Future of the American Press
JRN 201 Journalism That Changed the World
C. Electives (6 credits)
Electives include courses not taken in B, above.
JRN 210/JRN 211 News II: Beat Reporting
JRN 220 Media Law and Ethics
JRN 310 Newswriting III: Reporting and Writing for Broadcast
JRN 320 The Promise and Perils of Online Journalism
JRN 337 Introduction to Narrative Journalism
Note: Minors may take additional journalism electives with permission of instructor.