Updated Information - Courses

Updates since Spring 2009 are in red

Spring 2011 Updates

ANT Anthropology

ANT 205-J Ancient Japanese Civilization 

This course surveys the emergence of early Japanese civilization from prehistoric times to the Nara period in the 8th century A.D. Analytical focus will be placed on specific topics, including the significance of population movement, the influence of Chinese civilization, the centralization of political authority, the development of Japanese language and early literacy, and the roles of ancient Japanese religion and mythology. These topics will be examined from archaeological, anthropological, and historical perspectives. The course aims to provide a thorough foundation for further study in Japanese history and culture.

Prerequisite: WRT 102; U2 status or higher

3 credits

AMS Applied Math and Statistics

AMS 318 Theory of Interest Financial Mathematics

BIO Biology

BIO 343 Invertebrate Zoology

Aspects of the diversity, comparative and functional morphology, natural history, evolution, and water-land transitions of invertebrate animals.  Three hours of lecture and one three-and-one-half hour laboratory per week.

BME Biomedical Engineering

BME 402 Contemporary Biotechnology

This course will provide an introduction into the realm of modern biotechnology and its applications.  This course introduces the historical development of biotechnology and its contemporary applications, including, bioproducts and biofuels, microbial fermentation/bioprocessing, aerobic bioreactors, modeling and simulation, metabolism and enzyme kinetics, metabolic engineering, bioremediation and environmental sustainability and human medicine.  Further, societal issues involving ethical and moral implications, perceptions and fears, intellectual property, safety, risks and regulatory issues, as well as economics of biotechnology will be discussed.

Prerequisite: BME 304

3 credits

BUS Business

BUS 330 Principles of Finance

Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 110, 111, 112, or 115, BUS 210

BUS 331 International Finance

Prerequisites: BUS 110 or BUS 115; BUS major or minor or AMS or ISE or MTD or ECO major
Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 330

BUS 335 Business Advertising and Promotion

Business to business marketing focus with an emphasis on Integrated Marketing Communications. Covering advertising agency and in-house specific issues. Marketing activities include advertising purchase, public relations, trade show promotion, direct marketing, interactive/Internet marketing, and touching upon relationship building through personal selling. Apply learning to a team project that will emphasize a comprehensive trade specific integrated marketing communications campaign.

Prerequisite: BUS Major and U3 or U4 standing
Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 credits

BUS 361 Retail Management

This course focuses on the necessary concepts and principles of retailing involved in making retail and wholesale decisions. The course looks at retailing from both a consumer perspective (e.g., why does a consumer shop a particular retail outlet?) and a business-to-business perspective (e.q., how does the retailer decide which supplier to use?) Additionally, the course examines the various methods of retailing (e.q./ bricks and mortar, bricks and clicks) and how these methods have evolved and will evolve in the future. The content of the course is useful for students interested in working in the retail industry, as well as for students interested in working for companies that interface with retailers such as manufacturers of consumer products or for students with a general management or entrepreneurial interest.

Prerequisite: BUS Major
Advisory Prereq: BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 Credits

BUS 363 Brand Management

This course teaches students fundamental and leading-edge concepts in brand management. It will address the strategic importance of branding, provide theories and strategies for building, leveraging, and defending strong brands, and discuss current opportunities and challenges facing brand managers. The student will learn how to manage key relationships and functions that surround the brand, e.g. , advertising, promotion, public relations, licensing, product and package design. A capable brand manager has exceptional strategic, quantitative, interpersonal, and presentation skills, and must be comfortable with decision-making and leadership. The course will focus on the development and application of these skills in brand management via in-class learning, case discussion, and project work.

Prerequisite: BUS Major
Advisory Prerequisite: BUS 348 or BUS 349

3 Credits

BUS 468 Risk Arbitrage

This course is designed as a practical approach to analyzing, predicting, and investing in the success or failure of mergers and acquisitions (including all change of control transactions). The course will apply basic financial principles and analytical techniques to solve real world problems facing M&A and Investment Professionals.

Prerequisites: BUS Major, BUS 330, and department consent

3 Credits

CME Chemical and Molecular Engineering

CME 318 Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics

Introduces fluid mechanics. Dynamics of fluids in motion; laminar and turbulent flow, Bernoulli's equation, friction in conduits; flow through fixed and fluidized beds. Study of pump and compressor performance and fluid metering devices. Includes introduction to microfluids.

Prerequisite: AMS 261 (or MAT 203 or 205); PHY 131 (or 125 or 141); CME Major or ESG Major

3 credits

CCS Cinema and Cultural Studies

CCS 301-G Theorizing Cinema and Culture

Prerequisite: CCS 101 or CCS 201

CCS 311-G Gender and Genre in Film

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B and one course from the following: CCS 101, CCS 201, CCS 204, CLL 215, CLT 235, HUF 211, HUG 221, HUI 231, HUM 201, HUM 202, HUR 241, THR 117

CCS 312-I Cinema and the Ancient World

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B and one course from the following: CCS 101, CCS 201, CCS 204, CLL 215, CLT 235, HUF 211, HUG 221, HUI 231, HUM 201, HUM 202, HUR 241, THR 117

CCS 313-H Television Studies

Prerequisite: Completion of DEC category B; CCS 101 or ARH 207/DIA 207

CCS 390-J Latin American Cinema

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B and one course from the following: CCS 101, CCS 201, CCS 204, CLL 215, CLT 235, HUF 211, HUG 221, HUI 231, HUM 201, HUM 202, HUR 241, THR 117

CCS 391-J Contemporary African Cinema and Cultural Studies

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B and one course from the following: CCS 101, CCS 201, CCS 204, CLL 215, CLT 235, HUF 211, HUG 221, HUI 231, HUM 201, HUM 202, HUR 241, THR 117

CCS 392-K American Cinema and Cultural Studies

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B and one course from the following: CCS 101, CCS 201, CCS 204, CLL 215, CLT 235, HUF 211, HUG 221, HUI 231, HUM 201, HUM 202, HUR 241, THR 117

CCS 393-I European Cinema and Cultural Studies

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B and one course from the following: CCS 101, CCS 201, CCS 204, CLL 215, CLT 235, HUF 211, HUG 221, HUI 231, HUM 201, HUM 202, HUR 241, THR 117

CCS 394-J Asian Cinema and Cultural Studies

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B and one course from the following: CCS 101, CCS 201, CCS 204, CLL 215, CLT 235, HUF 211, HUG 221, HUI 231, HUM 201, HUM 202, HUR 241, THR 117

CCS 395-H Digital Cultural Studies

Prerequisite: Completion of DEC category B; CCS 101 or ARH 207/DIA 207

CCS 396-H Video and Computer Game History

Prerequisite: CCS 101 or ARH 207/DIA 207; Satisfaction of DEC B or DEC D

CCS 397-H Video and Computer Game Culture

Prerequisite: CCS 101 or ARH 207/DIA 207; Satisfaction of DEC B or DEC D

CCS 401 Senior Seminar in Cinema and Cultural Studies

Prerequisite: CCS major and U4 standing; CCS 301

CLT Comparative Literature

CLT 335-G Interdisciplinary Study of Film

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B and one course from the following: CCS 101, CCS 201, CCS 204, CLL 215, CLT 235, HUF 211, HUG 221, HUI 231, HUM 201, HUM 202, HUR 241, THR 117

CLT 391-J African Comparative Literature

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. B and one lower-division course from one of the following subject designators: CLT, CCS, EGL, or HUM

CLT 392-K Multicultural Comparative Literature

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. B and one lower-division course from one of the following subject designators: CLT, CCS, EGL, or HUM

CLT 393-I European Comparative Literature

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. B and one lower-division course from one of the following subject designators: CLT, CCS, EGL, or HUM

CLT 394-J Asian Comparative Literature

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. B and one lower-division course from one of the following subject designators: CLT, CCS, EGL, or HUM

CSE Computer Science

CSE 300 Writing in Computer Science Technical Communications

Principles of professional technical communications for Computer Science and Information Systems majors. Topics include writing business communications, user manuals, press releases, literature reviews, and research abstracts. Persuasive oral communications and effective presentation techniques, to address a range of audiences, will also be covered. This course satisfies the upper-division writing requirement for CSE and ISE majors.

CSE 323 Human-Computer Interaction

Prerequisites: CSE 214 or CSE 230 or CSE 260 or ISE 208

CSE 336 Internet Programming

This course is offered as both CSE 336 and ISE 336

EDP Environmental Design, Policy, and Planning

EDP 487 Research in Environmental Design, Policy, & Planning

Qualified advanced undergraduates may carry out individual research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated.

1-6 credits, S/U Grade Basis only

EHI Ecosystems and Human Impact

EHI 487 Research in Ecosystems and Human Impact

Qualified advanced undergraduates may carry out individual research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated.

1-6 credits, S/U Grade Basis only


EHM Environmental Humanities

EHM 487 Research in Environmental Humanities

Qualified advanced undergraduates may carry out individual research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated.

1-6 credits, S/U Grade Basis only

ENV Environmental Science

ENV 304 Global Environmental Change: This course is now crosslisted with GEO 307 Global Environmental Change 

ESG Engineering Science

ESG 302 Thermodynamics of Materials

Prerequisite: ESG 198 or CHE 131/133, 132

ESG 332 Materials Science

Prerequisite: CHE 131 or CHE 141 or ESG 198 and ESG 302 or PHY 306 or CME 304 or CHE 353 (or Mechanical Engineering majors may use MEC 301 as a corequisite)

EST Technology and Society

EST 203 Technology in the City

This course covers the intersection of technology and society. Topics include, how different technologies play an essential element of urban society such as transportation systems, energy, and financial systems. It examines the changes in technology which causes changes in society.

3 credits

GEO Geology

GEO 307 Global Environmental Change: This course was added as a crosslisted course with ENV 304 Global Environmental Change

HON Honors College

HON 105 Modes of Knowledge

Prerequisite: First year Honors College membership

HON 106 Modes of Being

Prerequisites: First year Honors College membership; HON 105

HON 201 The Arts and Society

Prerequisites: Second year Honors College membership; HON 105 and HON 106

HON 301 Science, Engineering, Medicine, and Society

Prerequisites: Third year Honors College membership; HON 105, HON 106, and HON 201

HON 401 Global Issues

Prerequisites: Fourth year Honors College membership; HON 105, HON 106, HON 201, and HON 301

HUM Humanities

HUM 201-D Film Genres

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B

HUM 202-D Film History

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B

ISE Information Systems

ISE 300 Writing in Information Systems Technical Communications

Principles of professional technical communications for Computer Science and Information Systems majors. Topics include writing business communications, user manuals, press releases, literature reviews, and research abstracts. Persuasive oral communications and effective presentation techniques, to address a range of audiences, will also be covered. This course satisfies the upper-division writing requirement for CSE and ISE majors.


ISE 323 Human-Computer Interaction

Prerequisites: CSE 214 or CSE 230 or CSE 260 or ISE 208

ISE 336 Internet Programming

This course is offered as both CSE 336 and ISE 336.

JRN Journalism

JRN 371 Television Production

Pre- or Corequisites: JRN 350 and JRN 370 or permission

JRN 390 Special Topics in Journalism

Prerequisite: JRN 101/103; may vary by topic

JRN 490 Specialized Internship

This is an advanced internship. Students will spend 2 days a week at the internship site, In addition, this Specialized Internship includes a weekly lecture designed to prepare students to report, write and produce stories that benefit from a greater knowledge of a subject. Examples of Specialized Internships include Hyperlocal Reporting, Police and Court Reporting, Governmental Reporting, Culture and the Arts. The work must involve journalistic skills related to the educational goals of the department.

Prerequisite: JRN 340; permission of instructor

JRN 490 Senior Project

Prerequisite: JRN 364 or 370 or 380
Pre- or Corequisites: JRN 361 or 371 or 381

LIN Linguistics

LIN 320 English Grammar

This course is a systematic survey of English grammar: it's major structures, their interaction, and their use. It will also briefly examine some related areas connected to writing like punctuation and spelling.

Prerequisite: Completion of DEC A
Advisory Prerequisite: LIN 101

3 credits

MUS Music

MUS 122 Beginning Keyboard

Prerequisite: Placement by undergraduate keyboard examination
Corerequisite for Music majors: MUS 121 and MUS 321


MUS 220 Musicianship II


Prerequisite: MUS 121 and 222 and MUS 321
Corequisite for Music majors: MUS 141 and MUS 322

SUS Sustainability Studies

SUS 487 Research in Sustainability Studies

Qualified advanced undergraduates may carry out individual research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated.

1-6 credits, S/U Grade Basis only

WRT Writing

WRT 100 Introductory Writing Workshop with ESL Emphasis: This course is now inactive. Students are directed to enroll in an appropriate section of WRT 101.

WRT 103 Intermediate Writing Workshop B: This course is now inactive. Students are directed to enroll in an appropriate section of WRT 102.


Fall 2010 Updates

ADV Advising
 
ADV 488 Academic Peer Advisor Internship

This two semester internship offers outstanding juniors and seniors an opportunity to gain advising experience, improve personal and professional skills, and explore career aspirations while providing assistance to others.  Responsibilities include a teaching assistantship for a first semester transfer student seminar, provide support to undergraduates on making the academic and personal transition to Stony Brook, conducting oral presentations with other Academic Peer Advisors to students, and serving as a role model and mentor for other Stony Brook undergraduates. Interns are required to attend a weekly Academic Peer Advisor seminar, complete a set number of outreach hours, assist with events across campus and work in the advising center.

Prerequisite: Students are selected for the course based on an application which may be obtained from the advising office. Students must have earned 45 credits and a 3.0 cumulative GPA by the application date.

0-4 credits, S/U grade basis only

ANP Biological Anthropology


ANP 304 Modern and Ancient Environments of Eastern Africa

With the world's longest sequence of datable deposits containing fossils of our ancestors, eastern Africa is the ideal place to examine humans' changing relations with our environment. This course familiarizes students with diverse ecological settings in the region today through tours and field exercises in highland forests, low-altitude grasslands, and lacustrine and riparian settings. Students learn various methods for paleoenvironmental reconstruction, and practice integrating different kinds of paleoenvironmental evidence in the field and laboratory facilities at TBI-Turkwel, Kenya. Examining modern vegetation and fauna in central and northwest Kenya shows students how human actions can degrade or conserve environments and resouces in eastern Africa today.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits


ANP 305 Vertebrate Paleontology of the Turkana Basin

Vertebrate fossils are important sources of information about the appearance, evolution, and extinction of major organisms. As such, they provide a valuable window into changes in climate and selection pressures, and organisms' diverse adaptive responses to these changes. They are also significant in placing hominid discoveries within a relative local chronology, and helping reconstruct environments associated with hominid finds. This course acquaints students with methods of vertebrate paleontology employed in different chronological contexts of the Turkana Basin, used to solve diverse theoretical questions.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits


ANP 306 Paleoanthropological Discoveries of the Turkana Basin

The Turkana Basin is home to many paleoanthropological discoveries that fundamentally reshaped ideas about human evolution. Richard, Maeve, and Louise Leakey will share perspectives on eight of these finds, including Nariokotome ("Turkana boy") and KNM-WT1700 (the "Black Skull"). Lectures and readings for each discovery will cover: 1) the research questions and strategies that led to the find; 2) the kind of analyses that have yielded the most important interpretive conclusions about the find; 3) how this discovery reshaped views of the human past; and 4) what new directions it catalyzed in human evolution research. Class activities consist of lectures by the Leakeys, laboratory exercises (reconstructions, measurements) using casts of the 5 kinds, and field trips to discovery locations.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits


ANP 307 Archaeology of the Turkana Basin

Sites in the Turkana Basin show changes in human technology and social organization from earliest times to today. Class trips to Early Stone Age sites show innovations in lithic technology during the first stages of stone tool production. Practice surveys and excavations focus on the past 10,000 years, when local hunter-gatherers began using pottery and bone harpoons, and eating aquatic resources. Additional site tours highlight 1) early herding in eastern Africa and the construction of stone pillar sites, possibly for ceremonial use, and 2) integration of fishing, herding, farming, and use of iron tools during the past 2000 years. Linking the human evolution finds with the present, class lectures, lab exercises, and field excursions show students how archaeologists document technological innovation, adoption, and transformation through material cultural evidence. Students learn diverse methods of survey and excavation appropriate for different sites and contexts.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits
 

ECO Economics

ECO 310 Basic Computational Methods in Economics

A first course in the computational and graphical techniques for finding numerical solutions to a small set of economic models (such as the Edgeworth Box) based on concepts and constructs presented in the intermediate microeconomics course. Includes the foundations of programming (using a symbolic algebra language), and finding maxima of functions, finding equilibria of markets, and exploring and fitting functions graphically. Emphasis is put on understanding the connections between the concepts, the algebra, the computation, and the graphical presentation of economic models and on using the numerical models to perform experiments.

Prerequisite:  C or higher in ECO 303

4 credits

GEO Geosciences

GEO 303 Geology of the Turkana Basin

Field course that applies fundamental geological concepts to the sediments and rock units in the Turkana Basin, Kenya, to provide a foundation for the chronology and context for recorded events in human evolution. Emphasis is given to sedimentation, stratigraphy, volcanism, and tectonics, as they apply to local geology, including training in field methods. Modern terrestrial processes and landscape evolution are examined using features present in the Turkana Basin. Consideration is also given to broader geologic events spanning the Oligocene to the present. Geologic concepts are linked to modern and ancient environments, archaeology, and paleoanthropology in northern Kenya.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office
Advisory Prerequisite: GEO 103 and GEO 113

3 credits

GEO 313-H Understanding Water Resources for the 21st Century

Drinking water is a topic of much interest and concern around the world. Issues to be covered will include global scarcities, water-borne disease, climate change, and organizational, corporate and emergency response. On a national and local level more detail will be devoted to source water protection and transmission, drought, industrial pollution, bottled water, pharmaceutical waste, treatment and filtration technologies, regulation and enforcement, peak demand and water conservation practice.

Prerequisite: One DEC E course

3 credits

GEO 448 Geosciences Colloquium

Every semester, the Department of Geosciences hosts a colloquium series. The series features weekly lectures covering a wide variety of geosciences research topics. The purpose of this course is to expose upper division geoscience students to current research being performed at Stony Brook University and elsewhere. May be repeated up to a limit of 3 credits.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status as a GEO or ESS major; Permission of Instructor

1 credit

PSY Psychology

PSY 285 Practicum in Infant/Toddler or Preschool Development and Education

Students work nine hours a week in a full-day child care center on campus with infants/toddlers or preschool-aged children (Section numbers 1 and 2 denote assignment to infants/toddlers; Section numbers 2 and 3 are the practicum with preschool-aged children).  Students gain practical experience in infancy or preschool development and education through guiding, teaching, preparing age-appropriate materials, and observing.  Students maintain daily journals; they also plan, develop, and implement appropriate educational activities that provide some of the basis for discussion and evaluation in the corequisite seminar, PSY 385. This course requires students to use knowledge gained in PSY 385 in a closely supervised situation. Can be repeated once by enrolling in a section that focuses on a different age group. Can be used once toward Psychology Department elective requirements.

Prerequisite: CFS 210 or CFS 322 or PSY 220 or PSY 325 or PSY 326; permission of instructor
Corequisite: PSY 385

3 credits

PSY 385-F Seminar in Infant/Toddler or Preschool Development and Education

Seminar in development and education of infants/toddlers or preschool-aged children (Section numbers 1 and 2 are seminar on infants/toddlers; Section numbers 2 and 3 are seminar on preschool-aged children). Sections devoted to infants/toddlers focus on learning and living environments that foster emergent communication and language skills and promote social, cognitive, physical, and emotional development. Sections devoted to preschool-aged children focus on emergent literacy, science and math discovery, and multi-sensory experiences that enhance motor development and exploration of the arts. Strategies for problem solving and promotion of positive social interaction and emotional development, including active listening, limit-setting, conflict negotiation, and child initiated approaches are examined from a multicultural perspective. Students design age-appropriate curricula and implement them under instructor supervision within the co-requisite practicum, PSY 285. Can be repeated once by enrolling in a section that focuses on a different age group.Can be used once toward Psychology Department elective requirements.

Prerequisite: CFS 210 or CFS 322 or PSY 220 or PSY 325 or PSY 326; permission of instructor
Corequisite: PSY 285

3 credits

UGC Undergraduate Colleges

ACH, GLS, HDV, ITS, LDS, SSO 475 Undergraduate College Teaching Practicum

The purpose of this course is to allow upper-division students the opportunity to work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's scheduled Undergraduate College seminars. The student must attend all classes and carry out tasks assigned by the faculty member to assist in teaching the course. The student will meet with the instructor on a regular basis to discuss intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. May be repeated up to a limit of 2 credits.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and department

1 credit; S/U Grade basis only

ACH, GLS, HDV, ITS, LDS, SSO 488 Undergraduate College Internship

Students learn about contemporary issues in higher education, community building, and teaching at a research university through hands-on work with faculty mentors. Work assigned will include participation in the planning and operation of events and initiatives sponsored by the Undergraduate Colleges. Students are required to submit written reports on their experiences to the Undergraduate Colleges office and Faculty Directors. May be repeated up to a limit of 6 credits.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and department

0-3 credits; S/U Grade basis only