ANT: Anthropology, Cultural and Archaeology

ANT 102 ​- F: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

The analysis of social and cultural topics such as kinship, family, marriage, politics, and religious systems, with an emphasis on their particular expression in non-Western societies.

3 credits

ANT 104 ​- F: Introduction to Archaeology

An introduction to the study of human behavior through the analysis of material residues. Case studies illustrate how archaeologists answer research questions originating in other social sciences, natural history, or humanities disciplines, thereby creating a unique interdisciplinary and long-term perspective on human behavior. The course provides a critical perspective on recent ethical and interpretive controversies about the human past.

3 credits

ANT 200 ​- J: Contemporary and Historical Perspectives on Insular Southeast Asia

The history, politics, and cultures of Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, East Timor, and Brunei. Special attention is given to the religious ideas and rituals, and relationships of power throughout the archipelago. The largest country by far in the region, Indonesia, receives most attention.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 201 ​- J: Peoples of South America

A survey of the social, cultural, and historical aspects of South American native peoples. Attention is given to issues of demography and biology, ecology, and cultural evolution. In-depth study of selected cultures and comparative study in selected cultural topics form the core of the course. Particular emphasis is given to topics of culture contact, culture change, tribal cultures in a context of national development, and cultural pluralism.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 203 ​- J: Native Peoples of North America

The various peoples and cultures of North America are studied with respect to their political, educational, linguistic, social, and cultural patterns. Selected societies are studied in depth.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 205 ​- J: Ancient Japanese Civilization

This course surveys the emergence of early Japanese civilization from prehistoric times to the Nara period in the 8th century A.D. Analytical focus will be placed on specific topics, including the significance of population movement, the influence of Chinese civilization, the centralization of political authority, the development of Japanese language and early literacy, and the roles of ancient Japanese religion and mythology. These topics will be examined from archaeological, anthropological, and historical perspectives. The course aims to provide a thorough foundation for further study in Japanese history and culture.

Prerequisite: U2 standing or higher

3 credits

ANT 230 ​- J: Peoples of the World

A comparative study of the lifeways of selected types of peoples, defined by adaptation, focusing on their ecology, economy, political organization, and social organization. Groups discussed include the gathering-and-hunting Ju/'hoansi of Africa, the horticultural Kaluli of New Guinea, the pastoralist Basseri of Iran, plus selected peasant and migrant groups. Recent changes affecting indigenes, brought about by technological developments and intercultural contact, are discussed.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 250 ​- J: African Peoples and Cultures

The prehistoric cradle of humankind, Africa is today home to diverse cultures, environments, languages, and economies. Western mass media often generalizes across this immense diversity, or focuses on areas of conflict, famine, or environmental devastation. This course introduces students to Africa via the voices of Africans themselves, or those of anthropologists who have spent many years on the continent.

3 credits

ANT 252 ​- F: Personality and Culture

The role of culture as a factor in personality and character formation and how different cultures handle the basic human drives, especially aggression. The course also discusses cultural influences on gender role, violence and social control, and mental health. Case studies from South America, Oceania, Malaysia, and southern Europe are compared.

Prerequisite: U2 standing or higher

3 credits

ANT 260 ​- K: How We Eat

This course explores how people's food habits are shaped not only by their biological needs, but also by the economic, political, ecological, and social worlds in which they live. The breadth of anthropology (biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and archaeology) is brought to bear on issues including the economic and political underpinnings of American as well as other food cultures; the relationship between food habits and health (both over-and under-eating); the environmental impacts of various methods of food production; the relationship between food and social status; gendered food production as well as food consumption; food's role in religion; ethical eating; the limits of current knowledge (e.g., changing dietary recommendations); and the socioeconomic pressures that keep individuals eating according to cultural norms. The class discusses foodways in a variety of present and past cultures, but the emphasis is on modern American food culture and the cultural, economic, ecological, and political realities that shape it. Students will explore how these realities affect their own lives and eating habits.

3 credits

ANT 270 ​- F: Great Archaeological Discoveries

Recent controversies surrounding the most important social transitions in human prehistory. These include the origin of modern human societies, the rise of agrarian communities, and the formation of early states, all examined in cross-cultural perspective. Major theories and models of human sociocultural evolution are tested with evidence from the best-documented archaeological sites in Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas.

Prerequisite: U2 or higher standing

Advisory Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 290 ​- H: Science and Technology in Ancient Society

Examination of the role of advances in science and technology in societies ranging from the earliest humans to the archaic civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. The course focuses on such innovations as tool making, fire, metallurgy, writing, mathematics, complex architecture, and relates these innovations to changes in sociopolitical organization.

Prerequisite: One D.E.C. category E course

3 credits

ANT 296 ​- I: Anthropology of the European Mediterranean

This course explores the societies and cultures of the southern European countries with emphasis placed on rural/agrarian adaptations, gender relations, ritual, religion and folklore, social stratification and social class, community organization, and rural-urban distinctions. Students will read case studies from Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Greece, as well as background material on "The Mediterranean" as a social and cultural construct. The monographs for this course cover mainly the post-War period, from the 1950s and up to the present, but a brief time is spent on the historical background from classical antiquity to the modern period. Not for credit in addition to ANT 396 with the topic "The Mediterranean."

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 304: Modern and Ancient Environments of Eastern Africa

With the world's longest sequence of datable deposits containing fossils of our ancestors, eastern Africa is the ideal place to examine humans' changing relations with our environment. This course familiarizes students with diverse ecological settings in the region today through tours and field exercises in highland forests, low-altitude grasslands, and lacustrine and riparian settings. Students learn various methods for paleoenvironmental reconstruction, and practice integrating different kinds of paleoenvironmental evidence in the field and laboratory facilities at TBI-Turkwel, Kenya. Examining modern vegetation and fauna in central and northwest Kenya shows students how human actions can degrade or conserve environments and resouces in eastern Africa today.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANT 305: Culture and Language of Madagascar

The major goal of this course is to introduce students to the Malagasy culture. Students will attend formal classes with native Malagasy speakers meet with local community and school groups, and attend a variety of cultural activities within the towns and villages that surround RNP.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANT 307: Archaeology of the Turkana Basin

Sites in the Turkana Basin show changes in human technology and social organization from earliest times to today. Class trips to Early Stone Age sites show innovations in lithic technology during the first stages of stone tool production. Practice surveys and excavations focus on the past 10,000 years, when local hunter-gatherers began using pottery and bone harpoons, and eating aquatic resources. Additional site tours highlight 1) early herding in eastern Africa and the construction of stone pillar sites, possibly for ceremonial use, and 2) integration of fishing, herding, farming, and use of iron tools during the past 2000 years. Linking the human evolution finds with the present, class lectures, lab exercises, and field excursions show students how archaeologists document technological innovation, adoption, and transformation through material cultural evidence. Students learn diverse methods of survey and excavation appropriate for different sites and contexts.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANT 310 ​- J: Ethnography

A particular cultural area of the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa, Oceania, Mexico and Guatemala, Asia, or the Middle East, is considered in terms of its history and ecology, with a comparative analysis of the cultural systems and social arrangements of representative ethnic groups. The aim of the course is to provide an overview of cultural diversity and uniformity in an area outside of Europe. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

Advisory prerequiste: One other ANT course

3 credits

ANT 311 ​- J: Immersion in Another Culture

A specific world area, such as the highlands of New Guinea or the Nilotic Southern Sudan, or a particularly well-documented people such as the Trobriand Islanders, are considered in detail. Lectures, texts, and films consider ecology, history, social change, language, cultural systems, and social arrangements toward providing students with a comprehensive understanding of another cultural system. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 350 ​- F: Medical Anthropology

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of health, illness, and curing. Topics covered include the human body as cultural construct, theories of illness causation, alternative medical systems, epidemiology, ethnopharmacology, cross-cultural psychiatry, sex and reproduction, nutrition, and the implications of culture for pain perception, stress, and health risk management.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 351 ​- F: Comparative Religion

A survey of religious behavior in cross-cultural perspective. The approach is broadly comparative and eminently anthropological, involving theories of origin and evolution of religious systems, as well as the functioning of religious behavior and institutions within the total culture. Case study material is drawn primarily from preliterate societies, but some reference is made to the large organized religious systems of complex stratified societies.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 353: Archaeological Analysis and Interpretation

Laboratory analysis of recently excavated materials from Long Island archaeological sites. Types of prehistoric material analyzed include lithic and ceramic artifacts and the remains of shellfish and vertebrates.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

ANT 354 ​- F: Family, Kinship, and Marriage

Concepts of family, kinship, marriage, incest, exogamy: their source in nature and culture and their social implications. Major theories are discussed historically, demographically, and ecologically. Brief case studies are presented to illustrate theories of social anthropology.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 355 ​- J: Ancient African Civilizations

The archaeology of Africa's later prehistoric and historic periods offers exciting contributions to global debates on the origins of agriculture and civilization. Covering the last 20,000 years, this course begins by examining the economic underpinnings of Africa's complex societies: intensive hunting and gathering, animal domestication, and early farming. Detailed case studies of six ancient civilizations (Egypt, Kerma, Aksum, Jenne, Swahili, and Great Zimbabwe) then demonstrate distinct processes of prehistoric social change in different parts of Africa. The course concludes by discussing African archaeological heritage conservation, research, and public education. This course is offered as both AFS 355 and ANT 355.

Prerequisites: One 100-level course in AFS or ANT; U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

ANT 357 ​- F: The Agricultural Revolution

The origins and consequences of agrarian (food-producing) adaptations. Examination of the social, technological, and ecological changes that ocurred when humans shifted from hunting and gathering to agriculture and pastoralism around 8000 years ago. Current theories about the origins and consequences of agro-pastoralism are evaluated in light of recent evidence from both Old and New Worlds.

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 358 ​- J: Ways to Civilization

A comparative study of processes of cultural evolution from simple agricultural societies to the achievement of civilization in different parts of the world. Emphasis is on current theories of state formation and on how these theories are supported by cultural evidence, especially from the six 'pristine' states of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Indus Valley, China, Meso-america, and Peru.

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 359: The Archaeology of Food

Explores the archaeological study of food and foodways. The emphasis is on the social aspects of food, particularly its roles in past power structures, social relationships, conceptions of identity, ritual practices, and gender roles. Also covers the theoretical and methodological approaches archaeologists use to study food in the past.

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 360 ​- J: Ancient Mesopotamia

The organization and development of the social, economic, political, and religious systems of ancient Mesopotamia through study of the archaeological and textual records. This course stresses the first two thousand years of this civilization, from 3500 B.C. to 1500 B.C.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

ANT 361 ​- F: Peasants

The concept of peasantry from political, religious, cultural, and social-class perspectives, as well as from the more traditional economic viewpoint. These agricultural peoples are described and analyzed especially in relation to the national societies of which they form a part. Case studies from Latin America, Europe, and Asia are used as illustrations. Special attention is given to the agrarian political movements and revolutions in the Third World.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 362 ​- J: Long Island Archaeology

Life on Long Island from its first settlement by Native Americans 12,000 years ago until the end of the 17th century. Trends and changes in human behavior are studied in the context of environmental and cultural processes affecting all of northeastern North America.

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 363 ​- F: Approaches in Archaeology

A survey of archaeological thought from early antiquarianism through the culture history, processual, and post-processual approaches to the investigation and analysis of past societies. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which changes in archaeological theory reflected changes in ideas within the sister fields of sociology, cultural anthropology and geography. Other topics discussed include ethnographic analogy, systems theory, site formation processes and spatial analysis.

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 367 ​- F: Male and Female

A study of the manifestation of sex roles in different cultures. Discussion topics include the impact of social, economic and political organization on gender roles and relationships, sexual orientation in cross-cultural perspective, and contemporary theories of gender inequality. Readings present both the male and female viewpoints.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 368: Archaeology of Human Origins

A survey of the archaeological evidence for behavioral variability and adaptation by early humans during the course of the Pliocene, and Early-Middle Pleistocene epochs (2.7-0.1 million years ago). Topics include early stone tool use, origins of hunting, early fire use, adaptations to glacial climates, behavioral differences among hominins living in Africa, Europe, and Asia.

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 371 ​- J: Ancient China

Explores the development of social, economic, political, and cultural systems in ancient China, from the neolithic period through the Han dynasty. Draws on archaeological data and historical texts to examine the emergence of state-level polities and their subsequent unification under imperial authority. Analytical focus is on political economy, social organization, ritual exchange, and notions of power and rulership expressed in philosophical thought. This course is offered as both AAS 371 and ANT 371.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; completion of D.E.C. category F

3 credits

ANT 372 ​- J: Family, Marriage, and Kinship in China

Examines forms and dynamics of social organizations in Chinese society, focusing on cultural, social, and economic aspects of family, marriage, and extended kinship relations such as lineages, clans, and sworn brotherhoods. Particular attention is paid to how gender, generation, class, and ritual exchange shape identity, status, and power. This course is offered as both AAS 372 and ANT 372.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

Advisory Prerequisites: AAS 220 and ANT 354

3 credits

ANT 373: Archaeology of Human Dispersals

A survey of the archaeological evidence for the dispersal of Homo sapiens during the Late Pleistocene epoch (128,000-13,000 years ago). Topics include African origin of Homo sapiens, dispersals into Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas, large mammal extinctions, origins of art, music, and symbolic behavior, and emergence of hunter-gatherer. Not for credit in addition to ANT 394 topic "Origin of Modern Humans."

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 379 ​- J: Ethnicity and Ecology in China

This course explores issues of ethnic and national identity in the context of the social ecology of the Chinese state, both past and present. It focuses on the material and social relationships that have shaped perceptions of, and interactions between, cultural groups in China and along its frontiers. Drawing on case studies from the Himalayan plateau, Yunnan highlands, Inner Asian steppes, Taiwan, and elsewhere, students examine how sustenance strategies, economic organization, and political administration have influenced construct of ethnic identity. This course is offered as both AAS 379 and ANT 379.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: AAS 220 or HIS 219 (or the former CNS 249 or 250)

3 credits

ANT 380 ​- J: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America and the Caribbean

Concepts and theories of race and ethnicity in Latin American and Caribbean settings. The historical evolution and the contemporary social and cultural significance of racial and ethnic identities within the region are explored. Specific examples of social relations characterized by ethnic or racial conflict are presented. This course is offered as both AFS 380 and ANT 380.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: AFS 240 or LAC 200

3 credits

ANT 381 ​- F: Applied Anthropology

A practical, career-oriented examination of how anthropological theory and method can be put to use in non-academic areas such as economic development, public health, environmental conservation, education, technology development, cultural advocacy, business, and law. Coordinated readings provide case illustrations.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

ANT 385 ​- J: Prehistoric Peoples of the Americas

Life in the Americas from first settlement at the end of the last ice age until the arrival of the Europeans in the 15th and 16th centuries. The culture, history, and evolution of prehistoric peoples of North, Central, and South America are treated. Specific topics covered include settlement by Native Americans, hunting-gathering lifeways, plant and animal domestication, the origins of village life, and state-level societies.

Prerequisite: ANT 104

3 credits

ANT 390 ​- F: Topics in Social and Cultural Anthropology

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 391 ​- F: Topics in Social and Cultural Anthropology

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

3 credits

ANT 393 ​- F: Topics in Archaeology

Topics in archaeology are taught from a social sciences perspectives. Recent topics have included: Origin of Modern Humans, Advent of the Iron Age, Old World Archaeology, and Ancient Egypt. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: ANT 104 and one other anthropology course

3 credits

ANT 394 ​- F: Topics in Archaeology

Topics in archaeology are taught from a social sciences perspectives. Recent topics have included: Origin of Modern Humans, Advent of the Iron Age, Old World Archaeology, and Ancient Egypt. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: ANT 104 and one other anthropology course

3 credits

ANT 395 ​- J: Religions of the Caribbean

An ethnographic approach to the relationship among religion, social organization, and identity politics through studying cultural and historical bases of Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and their related religious manifestations in the Caribbean. Class stratification, ethnic conflict, and fundamentalist movements are explored. This course is offered as both AFS 395 and ANT 395.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: ANT 351

3 credits

ANT 401: Problems in Social and Cultural Anthropology

Research and discussion of a selected topic in social and cultural anthropology. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

Advisory prerequisite: Two other ANT courses at the 200 level or higher

3 credits

ANT 402: Problems in Archaeology

Research and discussion of a selected topic in the prehistory of the Old and New Worlds. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: ANT 104

Advisory prerequisite: Two other archaeology courses

3 credits

ANT 405: Cultural Ecology

Using the model of ecological adaptation as a starting point, this course explores the impact of the natural and social environment upon human culture. By the latter is meant the way of life of a particular society: its politics, religion, ways of thought, moral standards, rituals and ceremonies, gender ideals and sex roles, and other aspects of ideology and belief. The course uses two anthropological texts that provide background concepts and terminologies, then exposes students to empirical case studies of ecological adaptation, both in pre-literate and literate societies.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

Advisory prerequisite: 200 level or higher ANT course

3 credits

ANT 415: Ethnoarchaeology

Ethnoarchaeology uses observations of present-day peoples to inform archaeological inquiry, based on analogies between past and present. Advanced undergraduate and graduate students will develop their ability to construct and evaluate such analogies. Using this skill, they will then explore ways in which ethnoarchaeological data contribute to archaeological research: hypothesis building, survey and excavation strategies, interpretation of site and artifact data, and understanding the causes and processes of human behavioral change. In addition to seminar discussions of theoretical issues and case studies, the course incorporates practical exercises in the surrounding community.

Prerequisite: ANT 104; ANT major or minor

3 credits

ANT 417: Primitive Technology

An introduction to the technology of hunter-gatherers. The course examines how archaeologists use both ethnography and experimentation to shed light on prehistoric human technological adaptations. Techniques for making and using primitive tools are practiced in weekly laboratory sessions.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

4 credits

ANT 418: Lithic Technology

A detailed overview of the methods archaeologists use to extract behavioral information from prehistoric stone tools. The course examines raw material economy, technological strategies, tool use, and discard behavior. Analytical methods are practiced through the computer-assisted analysis of tools from simulated archaeological sites.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

4 credits

ANT 419: Zooarchaeology

The study of animal bones from archaeological sites. Special emphasis is on the identification of fragmented bone and surface modification, calculation of indexes of abundance, and measurement and metrical analysis of mammal bone. Computer analysis is stressed, and the class seeks a fusion of traditional zooarchaeology and actualistic studies. Three to four hours of computer laboratory work required per week.

Prerequisites: ANT 104 or ANP 120; permission of instructor

Advisory Prerequisite: One other archaeology course

3 credits

ANT 420: Environmental Analysis Using Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems

The use of aerial and satellite imagery in environmental analysis and the manipulation of geographic data sets of all types using Geographic Information Systems. Concentrating on Long Island, each student designs and completes a research project on a particular section of the area, focusing on the habitats of local wildlife, the locations of archaeological sites, coastal regimes, etc. Students should expect to spend approximately 10 hours per week beyond regularly scheduled classes in a University computer laboratory. This course is offered as both ANT 420 and GEO 420.

Prerequisite: Upper-division course in ANT or BIO or GEO or MAR

4 credits

ANT 447: Readings in Anthropology

Individual advanced readings on selected topics in anthropology. May be repeated up to a limit of 6 credits.

Prerequisites: ANT 102; two other ANT courses at the 200 level or higher; permission of instructor

3 credits

ANT 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; anthropology major; 3.00 g.p.a.; permission of instructor

3 credits, S/U grading

ANT 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. In ANT 476, students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; anthropology major; 3.00 g.p.a.; permission of instructor

3 credits, S/U grading

ANT 487: Independent Research in Anthropology

Independent research projects carried out by upper-division students. May be repeated up to a limit of six credits.

Prerequisites: 15 credits in anthropology; permission of instructor

0-6 credits

ANT 488: Internship

Participation in local, state, and national public and private agencies and organizations. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final written report on their experiences to the faculty sponsor and the department. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: 15 credits in anthropology; permission of instructor

0-6 credits, S/U grading

ANT 495: Senior Honors Project in Anthropology

First course of a two-semester project for anthropology majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. Arranged in consultation with the department through the director of undergraduate studies, the project involves independent readings or research and the writing of a paper under the close supervision of an appropriate faculty member on a suitable topic selected by the student. Students enrolled in ANT 495 are obliged to complete ANT 496 the following semester. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence.

Prerequisite: Admission to the anthropology honors program

3 credits

ANT 496: Senior Honors Project in Anthropology

Second course of a two-semester project for anthropology majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. Arranged in consultation with the department through the director of undergraduate studies, the project involves independent readings or research and the writing of a paper under the close supervision of an appropriate faculty member on a suitable topic selected by the student. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence.

Prerequisite: ANT 495; admission to the anthropology honors program

3 credits