ARH: Art History

ARH 101 ​- D: Art in Culture from Prehistoric Times to the Age of the Cathedrals, ca. 1400 A.D.

A survey of the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture from its beginnings in prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. Works of art are studied both as individual monuments with intrinsic aesthetic appeal and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the particular society in which they were created.

3 credits

ARH 102 ​- D: Art in Culture from the Early Renaissance, ca.1400, to Postmodernism

A survey of the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present day. Works of art are studied both as individual monuments with intrinsic aesthetic appeal and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the particular society in which they were created.

3 credits

ARH 201 ​- D: Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

An introduction to the arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. Following discussion of basic concepts in studying non-Western art, the course focuses on comparing and contrasting the arts of particular societies in each of these regions from ancient times to the present.

Advisory Prerequisite: U2 standing

3 credits

ARH 205 ​- G: Introduction to Architecture

An introduction to the discipline of architecture through various interpretations of its technological and cultural functions. Focusing on the history of architecture's engagement with engineering, anthropology, sociology, and politics, this course explores changing conceptions of the nature and the task of architecture.

3 credits

ARH 207: Digital Media: History and Theory

An introduction to historical and theoretical issues in digital media. Following discussion of basic concepts in studying digital media, the course focuses on examining the history of computer technologies, and their theoretical implications and cultural ramifications in the present. This course is offered as ARH 207 and DIA 207.

3 credits

ARH 299: Gallery Management Workshop

Development of practical skills in the business and managerial problems of an art gallery. Assigned readings focus on arts administration, arts conservation, and connoisseurship. May be repeated twice.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or 102

1 credit

ARH 300 ​- I: Greek Art and Architecture

The study of ancient Greek art and architecture from the earliest beginnings in the geometric period through the archaic, classical, and Hellenistic periods.

Prerequisite: ARH 101

3 credits

ARH 301 ​- I: Roman Art and Architecture

The study of ancient Roman art and architecture from the Republic through the Constantinian period in Italy and the greater Roman world.

Prerequisite: ARH 101

3 credits

ARH 302 ​- J: Ancient Egyptian Art

Survey of art and architecture of ancient Egypt from the development of the first monumental art and architecture (c. 3000 B.C.) through the Early Christian era (c. 300 A.D.) focusing on culturally specific concepts of representation and aesthetics and the status and purposes of ancient Egyptian arts. The role of patronage, the uses of art and architecture in cult, in temples, and in tombs, and the relationship of art and politics are considered, along with the question of the place of Egyptian art within the development of world art and the concept of Egypt as the African origins of Western civilization.

Prerequisite: ARH 101

3 credits

ARH 305 ​- I: Art and Culture of the Middle Ages

A broad examination of the art and architecture of the Middle Ages in the context of medieval history and culture. Topics include relationships to the imperial tradition, monasticism, and feudalism; the interaction and legacy of Roman, Celtic, and Germanic arts; the rise of urban culture and the creative competition between cities.

Prerequisite: ARH 101

3 credits

ARH 306 ​- I: The Early Renaissance in Italy

Art in Italy in from the late 13th through the 15th centuries, with special emphasis on Florence and Siena, and such major figures as Masaccio, Donatello, Piero della Francesca, and Botticelli. This course offered as both ARH 306 and HUI 306.

Prerequisite: ARH 101

3 credits

ARH 307 ​- I: The Age of Michelangelo in Central Italy

An exploration of the works of Michelangelo, Da Vinci and other major masters, including Raphael, Bramante and Pontormo, who inspired, were influenced by or rejected the work and ideals of Michelangelo.This course is offered as both ARH 307 and HUI 307.

Prerequisite: ARH 101

Advisory prerequisite: ARH 306

3 credits

ARH 310 ​- I: Splendors of Renaissance Art in Venice

The special qualities of Venetian art, which blends Byzantine, Islamic, and Western traditions, are explored through the works of such major figures as Giovanni Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Veronese, and Palladio. Course offered as both ARH 310 and HUI 310.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 and 102

Advisory prerequisite: ARH 307

3 credits

ARH 314 ​- I: Northern Baroque Art and Architecture, 1600-1700

A study structured around the comparison of the art and architecture of urban and court cultures in 17th century Flanders, Netherlands, France, and England. Topics include royal and court portraiture (Rubens, Van Dyck, Le Brun), individual and civic portraiture of the Dutch middle classes (Rembrandt, Hals), genre painting and the marketing of 'low life' imagery (Steen, Brouwer), the production of the domestic sphere in Dutch everyday life scenes (Vermeer, Metsu, Ter Borch), the rise of landscape (Poussin, Lorrain, Hobberma), as well as urban and court spectacle in Antwerp, London, and Versailles.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

3 credits

ARH 316 ​- I: Baroque Art in Italy and Spain, 1600-1700

Examination of the visual culture of Counter Reformation Italy and Spain, focusing predominantly on art and architecture of 17th century Rome and the Spanish court. The painting of Caravaggio and Carracci, as well as the sculpture and architecture of Bernini and Borromini are studied in detail. Topics include genre painting and the emergence of the art market; gender stereotypes and the market for religious images of eroticism, mysticism, and violence in Italy and Spain; secular frescoes and their patrons; papal projects and the transformation of Rome; strategies of self representation for the religious orders; portraiture and art collecting at the Spanish court; and Baroque encounters with the New World.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

3 credits

ARH 317 ​- J: Islamic Art

Art and architecture in the Islamic world from ca. 600 A.D. to the present, introducing the varied traditions of the arts of the Islamic world, from Spain and Morocco to the Indian subcontinent. Consideration of both religious and secular art and architecture in their historical and cultural contexts with emphasis on the development of Islamic forms of visual representation.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH course

3 credits

ARH 319 ​- J: Arts of China

A survey of Chinese art from the Neolithic period to modern-day China. Visual media such as bronze, jade, sculpture, ink painting and pottery as well as their cultural influence on philosophy, literature, religion and politics will be explored. The course will also examine the influence of India and Central Asian on Chinese art and, in turn, China's influence on Korean and Japanese art.

Prerequisite: One DEC D course and U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

ARH 320 ​- I: Art in the Age of Enlightenment

A survey of European art from about 1690 to 1790. Although lectures usually focus on a single artist at a time, the course as a whole stresses artistic attitudes as well as a progression of styles. An effort is made to study art in historical and cultural context, especially in the light of the new philosophies of rationalism, empiricism and individualism that developed and led to both industrial and political revolutions. The three schools covered are the Venetian, English, and French, from the late Baroque and the Rococo styles to the rise of landscape and early Romantic art. Major artists treated are Tiepolo, Canaletto, Watteau, Chardin, Boucher, Fragonard, Hogarth, Gainsborough, Greuze and David.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

3 credits

ARH 322 ​- G: American Art Since 1947

A survey of painting and sculpture in New York, including abstract expressionism, hard edge painting, pop art, minimal art, earthworks, protest art, and postmodernism.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

Advisory Prerequisite: ARH 342

3 credits

ARH 324 ​- G: Architecture and Design of the 19th and 20th Centuries

A survey of architecture and design from the end of the 18th century to the present. Subjects covered include the crystallization and evolution of Romantic classicism and Romantic naturalism, historicism, the arts and crafts movement, art nouveau, machine aesthetics, the beaux arts tradition, functionalism, the international style, art deco, and postmodernism.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

3 credits

ARH 325 ​- J: Ancient Mesopotamian Art

Survey of the art and architecture of ancient Mesopotamia from the establishment of the first cities and the development of the first monumental architecture (c. 3300 B.C.) through the Hellenistic conquest. Focus on concepts of representation and aesthetics and their uses in politics, private rituals, and state cults.

Prerequisite: ARH 101

3 credits

ARH 326 ​- J: Arts of Ancient Mesoamerica

A survey of the artistic and cultural achievements of the major civilizations of Central America prior to the European conquest. Emphasis is on architectural and sculptural art forms and the ritual, social, and political contexts within which they were created.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: ARH 201

3 credits

ARH 328 ​- J: Arts of West Africa

A study of the arts of West Africa from ancient to contemporary civilizations. Emphasis is primarily on the history of sculptural traditions, especially figurative sculpture and masquerade. These arts are examined in their political, social, and cultural contexts, as objects of ritual and religious practices, and as evidence of aesthetic choices and achievements.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: ARH 201

3 credits

ARH 329 ​- G: Arts of the African Diaspora

A study of the arts of the African Diaspora from the African continent to Brazil, Surinam, the Caribbean, and the United States. Emphasis is on the full range of art forms, including not only sculptural and performance traditions, but also textiles, basketry, and other crafts. Cultural continuities, spiritual belief, and significant changes in context, meaning, style, and technology are examined.This course is offered as both AFH 339 and ARH 329.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: ARH 201

3 credits

ARH 331 ​- K: American Art to 1870

Issues of the history of American painting, sculpture, and architecture from the early colonial period to the post-Reconstruction era. The course examines the creative accomplishments of both prominent and lesser-known American artists; and promotes a broader perspective of United States art history by highlighting art's relationship to developments in American history.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or 102

3 credits

ARH 332 ​- K: American Art, 1870-1940

The histories of American painting, sculpture, architecture, and photography from the period spanning Reconstruction and the rise of modern urban commercial culture to the beginning of World War II. The course examines the creative accomplishments of various prominent American artists and promotes a broader perspective of United States art history by highlighting art's relationship to developments in American history.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or 102

Advisory prerequisite: ARH 331

3 credits

ARH 333 ​- K: Arts for the Public

The history of efforts to develop forms of artistic work that engage broad audiences of citizens and consumers. Examination of a range of enterprises spanning the century, including monuments, murals, animated cartoons, propaganda, and the Web. Drawing on perspectives from art history, social history, and cultural studies, the course considers developments throughout the 20th century in the United States such as urbanization, political and business expansion, class and racial conflict, war, and technological innovation, in relation to art work.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or CCS 101

Advisory prerequisite: ARH 332 or 342

3 credits

ARH 334 ​- G: Performance Art I: The European Avant-Guard

This course explores the history and theory of avant-guard performance from its inception in the early 20th century through Surrealism. Questions addressed focus on the choices made by artists, and the forces within the culture that encourage the forms they use. Course projects include a performance that reconstructs an event from one of the periods studied and a term paper. This course is offered as both ARH 334 and THR 334.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH, ARS, MUS, or THR course

Advisory Prerequisite: ARS/MUS/THR 208

3 credits

ARH 335 ​- G: History of Photography

A historical survey of the technical, theoretical, and aesthetic development of black-and-white and color still photography and its close interrelationship with the evolution of modern art.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or CCS 101

Advisory Prerequisite: ARH 332 or 342

3 credits

ARH 336 ​- G: Digital Visual Culture

An investigation of historical and theoretical issues in digital visual culture. Students will build the critical literacy necessary to interrogate the images, text and sound of contemporary digital culture. Emphasis is on examining the history of information technologies, their theoretical implications, and cultural ramifications.

Prerequisite: ARH 102; ARS/MUS/THR 208 or ARS 225 or ARS 205 or CCS 101

3 credits

ARH 337 ​- I: Northern Renaissance Art

Painting and graphic art in the Netherlands and Germany in the 15th and 16th centuries are studied with special emphasis on the major figures of this period, from van Eyck and van der Weyden to Durer, Holbein, and Bruegel.

Prerequisite: ARH 101 or 102

3 credits

ARH 342 ​- G: Art of the 20th Century

The major movements and individual artists in 20th-century painting and sculpture, including reference to the broader sociocultural context of art.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

3 credits

ARH 344 ​- G: Performance Art II: World War II to the Present

This course explores the history and theory of performance art from World War II to the present, using an international perspective to identify different forms and practices from Happenings to Body Art and the introduction of new technologies. Questions addressed focus on the choices made by artists, and the forces within the culture that encourage the forms they use. Course projects include developing a site specific performance and a term paper. This course is offered as both ARH 344 and THR 344.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH, ARS, MUS, or THR course

Advisory Prerequisite: ARH/THR 334

3 credits

ARH 345 ​- G: The Moving Image in 20th century Art

A survey of the use of cinematic technologies within modern and contemporary art practice, from the historical avant-guard to contemporary multiscreen video installation. Situates the history and theory of this work in relation to the evolution of modern art and media culture.

Prerequisites: ARH 102 or CCS 101

Advisory Prerequisites: ARH 342

3 credits

ARH 346 ​- I: Art and Politics in the Age of Revolution

A survey of European art from about 1790 to 1850, stressing artistic attitudes as well as a progression of styles. A special effort is made to view art in historical and cultural context. A principal theme is the development of the modern artistic ideology through ideals such as genius, originality, and the sublime, all of which emerge in the context of a series of political revolutions going from 1789 to 1848. Conflict between the aesthetic and the political, the personal and the public, the traditional and the modern will be explored. Major artists treated are: David, Goya, Fuessli, Blake, Runge, Friedrich, Constable, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Turner, Courbet. Not for credit in addition to ARH 341.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

Advisory Prerequisite: One or more 300-level ARH courses

3 credits

ARH 347 ​- I: Avant-Garde Art: Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism

An examination of the origins of the avant-garde in European painting and its revolutionary developments from Impressionism through Post Impressionism. The course explores the social, political, and cultural roots of the artists who overturned conservative traditions in favor of modern values and thus established the basis and direction for the art of our time. Conflicts between the aesthetic and the political, the personal and the public, the traditional and the modern will be explored. Social relationships, including those of class and gender, are also embedded in works claiming objective naturalism. Major artists treated are Manet, Degas, Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, Seurat, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Cezanne. Not for credit in addition to ARH 341.

Prerequisite: ARH 102

Advisory Prerequisite: One or more 300-level ARH courses

3 credits

ARH 370 ​- I: Masterpieces of Western Art

In-depth exploration of a select number of major art works central to the Western tradition, e.g., the Parthenon, Chartres Cathedral, the Sistine Chapel. Monuments are analyzed visually, historically, technically, and in terms of their meaning and function for those who commissioned and those who created them. The student develops a critical vocabulary for the analysis, interpretation, and experience of the work of art. Among the issues discussed is the continuing aesthetic and expressive validity or significance of a monument despite changes of context and culture. Not for major credit.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; Completion of D.E.C. categories B and D

3 credits

ARH 390 ​- I: Topics in European Art

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific descriptions when course is offered. Past topics have included titles such as Mythology in Art; European Popular Art; and Italian Renaissance Sculpture. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to Western civilization. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the development of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of Western civilization, and relate it to that of other regions in the world. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; additional prerequisites when topic is announced

3 credits

ARH 391 ​- G: Topics in Global Art

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific descriptions when course is offered. Topics may include titles such as The Art of India or The Experience of Contemporary Art. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific descriptions when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH course

3 credits

ARH 394 ​- J: Topics in Asian Art

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific descriptions when course is offered. Past topics have included titles such as The Art of India and The Art of the Silk Road. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to non-Western world civilizations. Students will be expected to demonstrate either a knowledge of a broad outline of world history, or the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of one non-Western civilization. May be repeated as the topic changes. This course is offered as both AAS 394 and ARH 394.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH course

3 credits

ARH 395 ​- J: Topics in Non-Western Art

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific descriptions when course is offered. Topics may include such titles as The Art of the Middle East and Balinese Art. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to non-Western world civilizations. Students will be expected to demonstrate either a knowledge of a broad outline of world history, or the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of one non-Western civilization. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH course

3 credits

ARH 396 ​- K: Topics in American Art

Topics in U.S. art, placed within a broad historical context, including social, political, economic, and cultural history and institutions. Topics may include gender issues in art history, American art from colonial to the present.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one ARH course

3 credits

ARH 400: Topics in Art History and Criticism

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: ARH 101 or 102; one other ARH course, varying with topic

3 credits

ARH 420: History and Methods of Art History

Seminar designed to engage students with the history and methods of art history. Through close readings of key texts and discussions, the course explores issues raised by aesthetics, iconography, formalism, the social history of art, as well as the impact of semiotics, feminism, psychoanalysis, and post-modernism on the discipline of art history.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; ARH 101 and 102

Advisory Prerequisite: One other ARH course

3 credits

ARH 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Prerequisites: Art history/criticism major; preferably U4 standing; sponsorship of an instructor; permission of department

3 credits, S/U grading

ARH 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. In ARH 476, students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisites: ARH 475; permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies

3 credits, S/U grading

ARH 485: Projects in Art History and Criticism in New York City

Independent work, under the supervision of a faculty member, investigating work or works from a particular style or period in New York City.

Prerequisites: ARH 101 and 102; two other ARH courses; permission of sponsor and department

0-6 credits

ARH 487: Independent Reading and Research in Art

May be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite: At least four courses in art; sponsorship of a faculty member; permission of department

0-6 credits

ARH 488: Internship

Participation in the work of galleries, museums, arts agencies, and art historical societies. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final report of their experiences to the faculty coordinator and the department. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits, but no more than six credits may count toward the major in art history/criticism and no more than three credits may count toward the major in studio art.

Prerequisite: Fifteen credits in the Art Department, of which at least six shall be in art history/criticism; upper-division standing with preference given to U4 students; permission of instructor and department

0-6 credits, S/U grading

ARH 490: Senior Seminar: Topics in Art History, Museum Studies, and Criticism

An advanced seminar for juniors and seniors that prepares students for continued study or work in the fields of art history, criticism, museum studies and other related areas. Topic will change each year depending on the topic chosen by the instructor.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; ARH 101 and 102; one additional ARH course

3 credits

ARH 495: Senior Honors Project in Art History and Criticism

A one-semester project for art history and criticism majors who are candidates for the degree with departmental honors.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department

3 credits