Requirements for the Major in Engineering Science (ESG)

Acceptance into the Major

Freshman and transfer applicants who have specified their interest in the Engineering Science major may be accepted directly into the major upon admission to the University. Students in good academic standing who were admitted to the University but not immediately accepted into the major may apply for acceptance in any semester, but priority for admission to the Engineering Science major is given to those students who have: 1) completed AMS 161 and PHY 132 or their equivalents, 2) earned a g.p.a. of 3.00 in all mathematics and physics courses with no more than one grade in the C range, and 3) received completed course evaluations for all transferred courses that are to be used to meet requirements for the major.

Requirements for the Major

The major in Engineering Science leads to the Bachelor of Engineering degree.

Completion of the major requires ap­proximately 93 credits, in addition to any credits needed for General Education (D.E.C.) and other Univer-sity requirements.

A. Core

1. Mathematics

AMS 151, AMS 161; AMS 261 or MAT 203; AMS 361 or MAT 303

Note: The following alternate calculus course sequences may be substituted for AMS 151, AMS 161 in major requirements or prerequisites: MAT 125, MAT 126, MAT 127; or MAT 131, MAT 132; or MAT 141, MAT 142; or MAT 171.

2.  Natural Sciences

PHY 131/PHY 133 and PHY 132/PHY 134; PHY 251/PHY 252 or ESG 281; ESG 198

Notes:

a. The physics course sequence PHY 125, PHY 126, PHY 127 or PHY 141, PHY 142 is acceptable in lieu of PHY 131/PHY 133, PHY 132/PHY 134.

b. The chemistry course sequence CHE 131, CHE 132, and CHE 133 or CHE 141, CHE 142, and CHE 143 is acceptable in lieu of ESG 198.

3. Computer Science: ESG 111

Note: CSE 114 or CSE 130 or ESE 124 may be substituted with permission of the department.

4. Engineering Science

-ESG 100; ESG 312; ESM 350; ESM 450; and the following eight courses:

-Materials Science and Engineering

-ESG 302 or CME 304, ESG 332, ESG 333, ESG 339
Note: Students specializing in Civil and Environmental Engineering in the Engineering Science degree program may substitute GEO 318 (Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes) or GEO 315 (Groundwater Hydrology) in place of ESG 339 (Thin Film Processing of Advanced Materials) in satisfying the core program requirements for the ESG degree.

-Electrical Engineering and Electronic Properties

-ESE 271

-Mechanical Engineering and Properties

-MEC 260, ESM 335

5. Engineering Synthesis and Design

-ESG 217, ESG 316, ESG 440, ESG 441; ESM 355

B. Engineering Specialization and Technical Electives

The area of specialization, composed of five technical electives including at least two design-oriented courses, (or four electives plus the upper-division prerequisite in electrical engineering, ESE 372, or mechanical engineering, MEC 363) must be declared in writing by the end of the junior year. It is selec­ted in consultation with a faculty advisor to ensure a cohesive course sequence with depth at the upper level.

The seven areas of specialization are biomedical engineering, civil and environmental engineering, electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, mechanical and manufacturing engineering, nanoscale engineering, and engineering management.

C. Upper-Division Writing Requirement: ESG 300 Writing in Engineering Science

All degree candidates must demonstrate skill in written English at a level acceptable for Engineering Science majors. The Engineering Science student must register for the writing course ESG 300 concurrently with ESG 312. The quality of writing in the technical reports submitted for ESG 312 is evaluated and students whose writing does not meet the required standard are referred for remedial help. Detailed guidelines are provided by the Department. If the standard of writing is judged acceptable, the student receives an S grade for ESG 300, thereby satisfying the requirement.

Grading

All courses taken to satisfy Require­ments A and B above must be taken for a letter grade. A grade of C or higher is required in the following courses (or their equivalents):

1. AMS 151, AMS 161; PHY 131/PHY 133 and PHY 132/PHY 134; ESG 217, ESG 302, ESG 312, ESG 332, ESG 440, ESG 441

2. Each of the five required technical electives offered by the college

Areas of Specialization

Each area of specialization requires two design-related courses and three elective courses above those used toward Requirement A, Core. Other technical electives may be substituted only with the approval of the undergraduate program director.

Biotechnology

Biotechnology involves the application of various engineering disciplines to biomedical problems, requiring a sound understanding of an engineering discipline coupled with principles of biology and biomaterials. Students utilize elective courses to learn the fundamentals of biology and bioengineering.

1. The following two courses must be completed:
a. BIO 150 The Living World or BIO 202 Fundamentals of Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology
b. ESM 353 Biomaterials

2. Three courses from the following:
• ESM 334 Materials Engineering
ESM 369 Polymers
BIO 202 Fundamentals of Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology (if not completed for 1 above)
BIO 203 Fundamentals of Biology: Cellular and Organ Physiology
BIO 328 Mammalian Physiology
BIO 334 Principles of Neurobiology
BME 304 Genetic Engineering
BME 381: Nanofabrication in Biomedical Applications
BME 404: Essentials of Tissue Engineering
BME 481: Biosensors
EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics
ESM 488 or 499 (See Note)
ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV (See Note)

Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director may be used as a technical elective.

Note: ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Civil and environmental engineering entails the study, research, and design of infrastructure or processes responding to societal needs for sustainable development. The student completes one of two specializations. Each provides preparation for further study or employment in structural materials engineering, environmental remediation, or engineering involving design for environment (DFE).


Civil Engineering Track:

1. Two required courses:
a. GEO 102 The Earth and GEO 112 Physical Geology Laboratory
b. GEO/MAR 318 Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes or GEO 309 Structural Geology or MEC 363 Mechanics of Solids
(Note: Students substituting GEO 318 Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes in place of ESG 339 Thin Film Processing of Advanced Materials can not use GEO 318 as a required course for the Civil Engineering Track)

2. Three technical electives chosen from the following:
ARH 205-G Introduction to Architecture
ATM 345 Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Dynamics
ATM 348 Atmospheric Physics
CSE 391 Special Topics in Computer Science (Solid Modeling topic only)
CSE 325 Computers and Sculpture
ESG 301-H Sustainability of the Long Island Pine Barrens
EST 330-H Natural Disasters: Societal Impacts and Technological Solutions
EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics
GEO 312 Structure and Properties of Materials
GEO 315 Groundwater Hydrology
GEO 316 Geochemistry of Surficial Processes
• A third course from 1. above
MAR 392-H Waste Management Issues
MAR 393 Waste Treatment Technologies
MEC 262 Dynamics
• MEC 402 Mechanical Vibrations
• MEC 442 Introduction to Experimental Stress Analysis
MEC 455 Applied Stress Analysis
ESM 212 Introduction to Environmental Materials Engineering
• ESM 334 Materials Engineering
ESM 336 Electronic Materials
ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director
ESG 440, ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III, IV (See Note)

Note: ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

Environmental Engineering Track:

It is highly recommended that students who intend to specialize in the Environmental Engineering track take CHE 131/CHE 133 and CHE 132/CHE 134 in place of ESG 198 in order to better prepare for higher level CHE coursework. 

1. Two required courses:
ESM 212 Intro to Environmental Materials Engineering
CHE 312 Physical Chemistry Short Course (or CHE 301 Physical Chemistry I)

2. Three technical electives chosen from:
ATM 205-E Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences
ATM 247 Atmospheric Structure and Analysis
ATM 305-E Global Atmospheric Change
ATM 345 Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Dynamics
ATM 348 Atmospheric Physics
ATM 397 Air Pollution and its Control
• CHE 302 Physical Chemistry II
• CHE 321 Organic Chemistry I
CHE 361 Nuclear Chemistry
CHE 362 Nuclear Chemistry Laboratory
BIO 201 E Fundamentals of Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems
ECO 373-H Economics of Environment and Natural Resources
ESG 301-H Sustainability of the Long Island Pine Barrens
ESG 440, ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III, IV (See Note)
• ESM 334 Materials Engineering
ESM 336 Electronic Materials
ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director
EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics
GEO 309 Structural Geology
GEO 312 Structure and Properties of Materials
GEO 316 Geochemistry of Surficial Processes
GEO 318/MAR 318 Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes (See Note II)
MAR 301 Environmental Microbiology
• MAR 308 Principles of Instrumental Analysis
MAR 318 Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes
MAR 320 Limnology
• MAR 333​-H Coastal Oceanography
MAR 336 Marine Pollution
MAR 340-H Environmental Problems and Solutions
MAR 385 Principles of Fishery Biology and Management
MAR 392-H Waste Management Issues
MAR 393 Waste Treatment Technologies
MAR 394 Environmental Toxicology and Public Health

Note: ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

Note II: Students substituting GEO 318 (Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes) in place of ESG 339 (Thin Film Processing of Advanced Materials) can not use GEO 318 as a required course for the Environmental Engineering Track.

Electrical Engineering

This specialization is intended to provide a depth of understanding of electronic devices, electronic materials, and electrical and electronic system design built upon the broad engineering science curriculum.

1. One of the following two-course design sequences:

a. ESE 218 Digital Systems Design and ESE 380 Embedded Microprocessor Systems Design I

b. ESE 305 Deterministic Signals and Systems and ESE 315 Control Systems Design

2. ESE 372 Electronics

3. ESM 336 Electronic Materials

4. Two courses chosen from the following:

  • ESE 304 Applications of Operational Amplifiers
  • ESE 306 Random Signals and Systems
  • ESE 307 Analog Filter Design
  • ESE 310 Electrical Circuit Analysis II
  • ESE 311 Analog Integrated Circuits
  • ESE 316 Digital Devices and Circuits
  • ESE 319 Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
  • ESE 332 Semiconductor Device Characterization
  • ESE 350 Electrical Power Systems
  • ESE 352 Electromechanical Energy Converters
  • ESE 358 Computer Vision
  • ESE 362 Optoelectronic Devices and Optical Imaging Techniques
  • ESE 381 Embedded Microprocessor Systems Design II
  • ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV (See Note)
  • EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director may be used as a technical elective.

Note: ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

Materials Science and Engineering

This specialization provides the opportunity for in-depth study of the relationship between performance-properties-processing in materials engineering and its applications. 

1. Students must take the following two courses:
a. ESM 336 Electronic Materials
b. ESM 325 Diffraction Techniques and Structure of Solids

2. Three courses from the following:
ESM 212 Introduction to Environmental Materials Engineering
ESM 213 Introduction to Nanotechnology Studies
• ESM 334 Materials Engineering
ESM 353 Biomaterials: Manufacture, Properties, and Applications
ESM 369 Polymer Engineering
ESM 400 Nanotechnology and Research
ESM 475 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum
ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV (See Note)
EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director may be used as a technical elective.

Note: ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

This specialization addresses the rapidly changing technology in the mechanical engineering and manufacturing industries that requires a highly educated workforce with knowledge of mechanical properties of materials, materials processing, design, thermodynamics, statistics, and analysis.

1. MEC 310 Introduction to Machine Design and MEC 410 Design of Machine Elements 

2. MEC 363 Mechanics of Solids 

3. Two courses from the following:
AMS 310 Survey of Probability and Statistics
CSE 391 Special Topics in Computer Science (Solid Modeling topic only)
CSE 325 Computers and Sculpture
ESM 212 Introduction to Environmental Materials Engineering
ESM 336 Electronic Materials
MEC 262 Dynamics
MEC 325 Manufacturing Processes
• MEC 402: Mechanical Vibrations
• MEC 411: Control System Analysis and Design
• MEC 442: Introduction to Experimental Stress Analysis
• MEC 460: Introduction to Robotics: Theory and Applications
ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV (See Note)
EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

Note: Other MEC coursework (completed with a grade of C or higher) may be counted as technical electives with permission of the Undergraduate Program Director.

Note: ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director may be used as a technical elective.

Note: ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

Nanoscale Engineering

The creation of functional materials and devices which involves controllable processes and transformations at the scale of billionths of a meter promises to become a major focus of future efforts in both engineering and scientific research. With a thorough background in materials science, engineering design, and surface and molecular chemistry and devices, this specialization prepares students for graduate study, as well as professional positions in materials and process engineering and research and development.

It is highly recommended that students intending to specialize in the Nanoscale Engineering track take CHE 131/CHE 133 and CHE 132/CHE 134 in place of ESG 198 in order to better prepare for higher level CHE coursework.

1. Two required courses:
a. ESM 213 Studies in Nanotechnology
b. ESM 336 Electronic Materials 

2. Three technical electives chosen from:
ESM 212 Introduction to Environmental Materials Engineering
• ESM 334 Materials Engineering
ESM 369 Polymer Engineering
CHE 301 Physical Chemistry I
CHE 302 Physical Chemistry II
CHE 312 Physical Chemistry
CHE 321 Organic Chemistry I
CHE 322 Organic Chemistry II
CHE 345 Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry
• CHE 351 Quantum Chemistry
• CHE 378 Materials Chemistry
BME 381 Nanofabrication in Biomedical Applications
ESM 299 Directed Research in Materials Science (with permission of Undergraduate Program Director)
ESM 325 Diffraction Techniques and Structures of Solids
ESM 353 Biomaterials: Manufacture, Properties, and Applications
ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 credits) or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 credits) or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director
ESG 440, ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III, IV (see Note)
EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics

Note: ESG 440/ESG 441 Engineering Science Design III/IV counts for one technical elective with permission of the instructor and the undergraduate program director.

Engineering Management

Students may take a specialization in Engineering Management consisting of the following courses:

1. Two required courses, EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics and ESG 201 Engineering Responses to Society

2. Three technical electives which may be satisfied by the following courses:

a. BUS 210 Financial Accounting

b. BUS 330 Principles of Finance

c. BUS 340 Information Systems in Management

d. BUS 348 Principles of Marketing

e. EST 305 Applications Software for Information Management

f.  EST 326 Management for Engineers

g. EST 327 Marketing for Engineers

h. EST 391 Technology Assessment

i.  EST 393 Project Management

j.  ISE 330 Information Management

k. ESM 212 Introduction to Environmental Materials Engineering

l. ESM 336 Electronic Materials

m. Another upper level course in Business, Technology and Society, or Economics with the permission of the undergraduate program director

Engineering Chemistry

The Engineering Chemistry major com­bines work in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Department of Chemistry and leads to the Bachelor of Science degree, awarded through the College of Arts and Sciences. See the major entry for additional information.

Physics of Materials

Physics majors may wish to pursue a career in engineering physics, particularly in the application of solid-state physics to materials science and engineering. After taking five courses in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, the student may become eligible for the master's degree program. See the physics major entry for additional information.

Bachelor of Engineering Degree/Master of Science Degree Program

An engineering science student may apply at the beginning of the junior year for admission to this special program, which leads to a Bachelor of Engineering degree at the end of the fourth year and a Master of Science degree at the end of the fifth year. In the junior year, the student takes ESM 350, which is normally taken in the senior year, instead of ESM 335. In the senior year, a student takes ESM 513, to use in lieu of ESM 335, in the fall and another graduate course in the spring. In the fifth year, the student takes 24 credits. The advantage of this program over the regular M.S. program is that a student may start his or her M.S. in the senior year, and that he or she needs only 24 credits in the fifth year as opposed to 30 credits for a regular M.S. student. For details of the M.S. degree requirements, see the graduate program director.