WRT: Writing

WRT 101 ​- A & 1: Introductory Writing Workshop

Frequent short papers are designed to help students develop fluency and correctness. The basic requirements of academic writing are introduced. A through C/Unsatisfactory grading only. The Pass/No credit option may not be selected for this course. WRT 101 Does not count towards D.E.C. A requirement for students matriculating before fall 1999. WRT 101 is not for credit in addition to EGC 100. Due to the content of the course, enrollment after the first week of class is not permitted.

Prerequisite: successful completion of ESL 193; or a score of less than 1050 on the combined SAT verbal and written exams; or less than 24 on the combined English and writing portions of the ACT

3 credits, ABC/U grading

WRT 102 ​- A & 2: Intermediate Writing Workshop A

Writing for academic purposes is emphasized. Students learn strategies for extended writing assignments at the university. At least three major essays, multiple drafts, and short papers are required. A through C/Unsatisfactory grading only. The Pass/No Credit option may not be used. Due to the content of the course, enrollment after the first week of class is not permitted.

Prerequisite: WRT 101; 3 or higher on the AP English Comp Lit exams; 1050 or higher on the combined verbal + writing SAT I components; 24 or higher on the combined English/Writing ACT components; C or higher in an approved transfer course

3 credits, ABC/U grading

WRT 200: Grammar and Style for Writers

Students will study the aspects of grammar that are most relevant to punctuation and to clear writing, including nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, nominative and accusative cases, phrases, clauses, gerunds, participles, infinitives, and complete sentences. Sentence imitation, sentence combining, and sentence invention techniques will also be used to help students become more flexible in their syntactic fluidity. There will be five tests, three short papers, and a final exam.

3 credits

WRT 201: Writing in the Disciplines: Special Topics

Writing in specified academic disciplines is taught through the analysis of texts in appropriate fields to discover discourse conventions. Students produce extended written projects. Different sections emphasize different disciplines.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

3 credits

WRT 205 ​- B: Writing about Global Literature

In this lecture course, we will read literature from countries such as Indonesia, Botswana, Burma, Nigeria, Brazil, Egypt, Kenya, Vietnam, and Trinidad. Students will write a one-page response to their reading for every class, and principles of thoughtful writing, including correct punctuation, will be reinforced. There will be two tests and a final exam.

3 credits

WRT 206 ​- K: Writing about African-American Literature and History

In this lecture course, we will read American Literature written by African-Americans and study that literature in its historical context. Readings will include works such as Frederick Douglass's Narrative, Harriet Wilson's Our Nig, William Wells Brown's Clotel, Charles Chesnutt's "The Sheriff's Children", W.E.B. Dubois's The Souls of Black Folk, Ida B. Wells's Lynch Law in all its Phases, James Weldon Johnson's Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Langston Hughes's The Big Sea, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes were Watching God, Richard Wright's Uncle Tom's Children, Chester Himes's Real Cool Killers, Alice Walker's The Color Purple, Toni Morrison's Beloved, and Walter Mosley's Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned. Literary readings will be supplemented by documents and essays that provide historical context. Students will write a one-page response to their reading for every class, and principles of thoughtful writing, including correct grammar, will be reinforced. There will be two tests and a final exam.

Prerequisite: WRT 102

3 credits

WRT 301: Writing in the Disciplines: Special Topics

Writing in specified academic disciplines is taught through the analysis of texts in appropriate fields to discover discourse conventions. Students produce a variety of written projects typical of the genres in the field. Different sections emphasize different disciplines. Typical topics will be Technical Writing, Business Writing, Legal Writing, and Writing for the Health Professions. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

3 credits

WRT 302 ​- G: Critical Writing Seminar: Special Topics

A writing seminar, with rotating historical, political, social, literary, and artistic topics suggested by the professors each semester. Frequent substantial writing projects are central to every version of the course. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

3 credits

WRT 303: The Personal Essay

The personal essay is a form that has recently come back into fashion. In this class we will engage the form by writing our own personal essays as well as reading and responding to the work of writers who have come to define the genre: examples include E. B. White, Langston Hughes, and Raymond Carver as well as more contemporary writers such as Joan Didion and Gene Shepherd. We will explore the differences between shaping experience as truth in a personal essay or memoir and as a work of fiction. As a definition of personal essay evolves, we will consider whether personal writing and essay writing (or 'essaying') have a place in academic writing. Students in this class will also be able to prepare a personal statement for their application for graduate or professional school.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

3 credits

WRT 304: Writing for Your Profession

In this course students learn about types of documents, rhetorical principles, and composing practices necessary for writing effectively in and about professional contexts. Coursework emphasizes each student's career interests, but lessons also address a variety of general professional issues, including audience awareness, research methods, ethics, collaboration, and verbal and visual communication. Students complete the course with practical knowledge and experience in composing business letters, proposals, and various kinds of professional reports. A creative, self-reflexive assignment also contextualizes each individual's professional aspirations within a bigger picture of his/her life and culture.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

3 credits

WRT 305: Writing for the Health Professions

This course will enable students interested in a health care career to develop their critical writing and researching skills. Increasingly, health care practice is 'evidence-based'; therefore, we will explore the uses of various types of evidence to understand better the health care needs of different populations. Students will conduct field research on a health issue of a local target population of their choice, investigate government documents that contain data on that issue and population, and perform scholarly research on the same issue as it affects the larger national population represented by that local one. Writing assignments will include a research proposal, field research results, data analysis, a literature review and a final project incorporating the multiple forms of research about the issue and population.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

3 credits

WRT 380: Advanced Research Writing: Theories, Methods, Practices

Good research skills are critical to academic success. Most disciplines require writing based upon research, as arguments and explanations make little impact on audiences without effective supporting evidence, drawn from relevant scholarship on the subject. This involves knowing how to use appropriate databases, source materials, and composing processes, as well as negotiating the values, genres, and languages of the scholarly communities in which one is researching. In this course, students will learn fundamentals of research methods, practice these methods in a series of integrated research and writing assignments, and engage in critical reflection about research and writing. Students will focus on an area of disciplinary interest to them, and practice these essential research and writing skills through a series of projects: library assignments, annotated bibliography, literature review, I-Search composing, and presentation of results.

Prerequisite: WRT 102

3 credits

WRT 381: Advanced Analytic and Argumentative Writing

An intensive writing course, refining skills appropriate to upper-division work. Content varies: focus may be on analysis or various intellectual issues, rhetorical strategies, or compositional problems within or across disciplines. Frequent substantial writing projects are central to every version of the course. May be repeated as the topic changes. This course is offered as both EGL 381 and WRT 381.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

3 credits

WRT 392: Theories and Methods of Mentoring Writers

Closely examines the difficulties implicit in mentoring writers, with special consideration for the roles of cultural expectations and social dynamics on both the teaching of writing and writers themselves. In small groups and one-to-one interactions, students explore theories and practices upon which composition instruction and writing center work depend. Building on the understanding that writing is a recursive process (a cycle of planning, drafting, revising, and editing), students also learn to analyze and problem-solve issues that become barriers for effective writing and communication.

Prerequisites: WRT 102 or 103; permission of instructor

3 credits

WRT 487: Independent Project

Qualified upper-division students may carry out advanced independent work under the supervision of an instructor in the program. May be repeated.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program director

0-6 credits

WRT 488: Internship

Participation in local, state, and national public and private agencies and organizations. May be repeated to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: g.p.a. of 2.50 or higher; permission of instructor and program director

0-6 credits, S/U grading