CHI: Chinese Language

CHI 101: Intensive Elementary Chinese

An intensive, 6-credit, elementary-level Chinese language course that provides foundational knowledge and skills including pronunciation, basic everyday conversational proficiency, principles of character formation, basic grammatical rules, and basic cultural norms and preferences that govern language use. Drawing upon a communicative approach, this course situates oral and written language in real-life contexts and promotes learner-centered, interactive classroom activities. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Chinese in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take CHI 101 without written permission from the supervisor of the course. May not be taken for credit after any other course in Chinese.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     LANG

6 credits

CHI 111: Elementary Chinese I

An introduction to spoken and written Chinese Mandarin, with equal attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory practice supplements class work. No student who has had two or more years of Chinese in high school or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency will be permitted to enroll in CHI 111 without written permission from the supervisor of the course.

4 credits

CHI 112: Elementary Chinese II

An introduction to spoken and written Chinese Mandarin, with equal attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory practice supplements class work.

Prerequisite: CHI 111

DEC:     S3
SBC:     LANG

4 credits

CHI 201: Intensive Intermediate Chinese

An intensive, 6-credit, intermediate-level course on spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. Drawing upon a communicative approach, this course situates oral and written language in real-life contexts and promotes learner-centered, interactive classroom activities. May not be taken for credit in addition to CHI 211 or CHI 212.

Prerequisite: CHI 112 or CHI 210 or proficiency in Chinese or placement into 201 or 211. See https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     GLO, HUM

6 credits

CHI 210: Elementary Chinese for Chinese Speakers

An elementary level Chinese language course for students who have had some exposure to the Chinese cultural norms and conventions and who already can communicate in Chinese orally on topics of daily routines, although with grammatical mistakes and non-standard pronunciation, but cannot read or write. The course focuses on reading and writing skills and expands the depth and scope of exposure to the Chinese culture.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     GLO

4 credits

CHI 211: Intermediate Chinese I

An intermediate course in Chinese Mandarin to develop audiolingual skills and reading and writing ability. Selected texts serve as the basis for practice in reading comprehension and composition. Intensive exercises in character writing are required to develop writing technique.

Prerequisite: CHI 112 or CHI 210 or proficiency in Chinese or placement into 201 or 211. See https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

CHI 212: Intermediate Chinese II

An intermediate course in Chinese Mandarin to develop audiolingual skills and reading and writing ability. Selected texts serve as the basis for practice in reading comprehension and composition. Intensive exercises in character writing are required to develop writing technique.

Prerequisite: CHI 211 or placement into 212. See https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

CHI 301: Advanced Chinese I

The first part of an advanced course designed for the third-year students of Chinese as a foreign or heritage language to strengthen their ability to understand, speak, read, and write Chinese beyond the intermediate level. Students learn to read and comprehend a variety of texts from Chinese newspaper/magazine articles, TV/films, and literary works and to write creatively and professionally in Chinese using sophisticated vocabulary and advanced Chinese characters. Students will also be trained to comprehend authentic spoken Mandarin Chinese, using a variety of audio-visual materials and to communicate in Mandarin Chinese, applying appropriate socio-cultural norms. This course is not intended for students who already speak Chinese natively.

Prerequisite: CHI 212 or CHI 201 or proficiency in Chinese

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

CHI 302: Advanced Chinese II

The second part of an advanced course designed for the third-year students of Chinese as a foreign or heritage language to strengthen their ability to understand, speak, read, and write Chinese beyond the intermediate level. Students learn to read and comprehend a variety of texts from Chinese newspaper/magazine articles, TV/films, and literary works and to write creatively and professionally in Chinese using sophisticated vocabulary and advanced Chinese characters. Students will also be trained to comprehend authentic spoken Mandarin Chinese, using a variety of audio-visual materials and to communicate in Mandarin Chinese, applying appropriate socio-cultural norms. This course is not intended for students who already speak Chinese natively.

Prerequisite: CHI 301 or placement test

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

CHI 410: Business Chinese

A course designed for students who wish to expand their Chinese communication skills in a business context and understand socio-economic situations as well as socio-cultural values in China. Upon completing this course, students will be able to hold conversations with correct business vocabulary and with culturally appropriate manners, read authentic materials related to business and economics in China, and write business correspondence in proper styles and formats.

Prerequisite: CHI 312 or equivalent

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

CHI 411: Readings in Journalistic Chinese

Narrative readings in Chinese selected from Chinese newspapers and magazines, including news reports and narrations on life styles, people, and landscapes. Students are expected to improve their skills in the analysis and writing of narrative readings. This course is designed for students who already have advanced level proficiency in Chinese, who can read and write everyday vernacular Chinese, but who have not been exposed to more formal language and literary forms. Not for credit in addition to the discontinued CHI 311.

Prerequisite: CHI 302 or placement test

DEC:     J & 3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

CHI 412: Readings in Classical Chinese

Introduction to writings in Chinese that appeared before the May 4th Movement (circa 1920), which marked the beginning of modern Chinese. The course introduces students to readings in classical Chinese and to acquaint students with cultures and customs of traditional China. This course is designed for students who already have advanced level proficiency in Chinese, who can read and write everyday vernacular Chinese, but who have not been exposed to more formal language and literary forms. Not for credit in addition to the discontinued CHI 312.

Prerequisite: CHI 302 or placement test

DEC:     J & 3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

CHI 421: Chinese Poetry and Short Stories

Selected masterpieces of poetry and short stories written during the first half of the 20th century. Students are expected to improve their skills in literature appreciation and to model their own writings after works read in class. This course is designed for students who already have advanced level proficiency in the Chinese language in all its forms including reading and writing. Not for credit in addition to the discontinued CHI 395 or CHI 321.

Prerequisite: Advanced level proficiency in Chinese

DEC:     J & 3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

CHI 422: Chinese Lyric Prose and Plays

Selected masterpieces of lyric prose and drama written during the first half of the 20th century. Students are expected to improve their skills in literature appreciation and to model their own writings after works read in class. This course is designed for students who already have advanced level proficiency in the Chinese language in all its forms including reading and writing. Not for credit in addition to the discontinued CHI 396 or CHI 322.

Prerequisite: Advanced level proficiency in Chinese

DEC:     J & 3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

CHI 426: Structure of Mandarin Chinese

Mandarin Chinese is only one of a very few contemporary languages whose history is documented in an unbroken tradition extending back to the second millennium BC. At the same time, it has more speakers than any other language spoken in the modern world. This course, which is taught in English, provides an introduction to the phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and writing system of the Mandarin Chinese language. It is designed to familiarize students with some fundamental knowledge of the structure of spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. Specifically, it aims to enable the students to acquire an understanding of basic methods used by linguists to observe and gather Mandarin Chinese data, to delineate structural properties with regard to the sound, tone, word, grammar, and discourse of the language, and to develop a basic typological comparison between Mandarin Chinese and English. Not for credit in addition to AAS 350.

Prerequisite: CHI 302 or permission by instructor

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

CHI 447: Directed Readings in Chinese

Individually supervised readings in selected topics in Chinese language and literature or, alternatively, for the purpose of developing Chinese vocabulary in a secondary field, in selected topics in the humanities, social sciences, or natural sciences. May be repeated.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

DEC:     S3
SBC:     EXP+

1-6 credits

CHI 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Each student conducts a weekly recitation section that supplements a lecture course. The student receives regularly scheduled supervision from the instructor. Responsibilities may include preparing material for discussion and helping students with practice sessions.

Prerequisites: Interview; permission of instructor

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

CHI 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Each student conducts a weekly recitation section that supplements a lecture course. The student receives regularly scheduled supervision from the instructor. Responsibilities may include preparing material for discussion and helping students with practice sessions.

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

CHI 487: Independent Research

An individual research project in Chinese, such as translation, analysis of documents or literature, etc., in consultation with the instructor. Students are expected to meet at regular intervals and to present the completed project at the end of the semester. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: Interview; permission of instructor

0-3 credits

CEF: School of Professional Development

CEF 347: Introduction to Special Education

An overview that will provide core knowledge of special education practices and legislation. Students will refine their knowledge of the values, issues, practices, and policies that guide the field of special education. Students will develop and improve skills in topics of special education, education efficacy, instructional issues, early intervention, transitions, family, and community concerns. As of Fall 2011, this course meets the NYS special education requirement for all pre-service candidates for teacher certification.

3 credits

EGL: English

EGL 111: World Literature: Ancient to Modern

Offers an introduction to world literature from the earliest recorded literary history to the beginnings of the modern period. Students will study divergent global literary traditions, including a focus on their relationship to English literature; they will also discuss the histories of cross-cultural contact, influence, and exchange through which such traditions encountered and shaped each other.

DEC:     B
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

EGL 112: World Literature: Modern and Contemporary

Offers an introduction to world literature of the modern and contemporary periods, focusing especially on the nineteenth, twentieth, and/or twenty-first centuries. Students will study divergent global literary traditions, including a focus on their relationship to English literature; they will also discuss the histories of cross-cultural contact, colonization, and exchange through which such traditions encountered and shaped each other.

DEC:     B
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

EGL 121: Global Film Traditions

An introductory film course with a focus on the cross-cultural study of film from multiple world traditions. Students will learn the basics of film analysis and terminology. They will also develop a familiarity with film traditions outside the US, including (but not necessarily limited to) parts of Europe, Senegal and other parts of Africa, South Asia (India, Pakistan, and elsewhere), Iran, China, Korea, Japan, and elsewhere.

DEC:     B
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

EGL 191: Introduction to Poetry

Intensive analysis of poems in English of various periods and types and varying complexity. Descriptions available from the English Department. Not for English major credit.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     B
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

EGL 192: Introduction to Fiction

An analysis of fictional prose in terms of each section's specific theme. A goal of each section is to interpret various pieces of literature in relation to a political or historical view, or a particular literary technique. Descriptions available from the English Department. Not for English major credit.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     B
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

EGL 193: Introduction to Drama

Introduction to the analysis of drama, emphasizing the literary more than the theatrical dimension of the works, through examination of a range of plays from a variety of genres and periods. Descriptions available from the English Department. Not for English major credit.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     B
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

EGL 194: Introduction to Film

Offers an introduction to film, including a basic familiarity with the terminology of film production and with techniques of film analysis. The course emphasizes critical viewing and writing, with attention to cinematography, editing, sound, narrative, authorship, genre and ideology. The course also offers an introduction to multiple cinematic traditions from across the globe.

DEC:     B
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

EGL 204: Literary Analysis and Argumentation

An introduction to the techniques and terminology of close literary analysis and argumentation as applied to poetry, fiction, and drama. The course includes frequent demanding writing assignments and is designed for students beginning their major study in English. Transfer credit is not accepted for this course.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

3 credits

EGL 205: Survey of British Literature I

The study of British literature from the Old English period to Milton.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     I
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 206: Survey of British Literature II

The study of British literature from Dryden to the end of the 19th century.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     I
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 207: History of the English Language

A survey of the history of the English language from its origins to the present, with emphasis on the historical development of the language and on modern English grammar and usage.

Prerequisite: EGL 204

3 credits

EGL 217: American Literature I

The study of American literature from 1607 to 1865.

Prerequisite: WRT 102

DEC:     K
SBC:     HUM, USA

3 credits

EGL 218: American Literature II

The study of American literature from 1865 to 1945, with attention to the antebellum historical and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: WRT 102

DEC:     K
SBC:     HUM, USA

3 credits

EGL 224: 20th-Century Literature in English

The study of literature in English in the 20th century from Great Britain, Africa, the Caribbean, Canada, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, and other countries and areas that produce material written in the English language.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     G
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

EGL 226: 20th-Century American Literature

A survey of major works reflecting the regional, ethnic, and traditional interests of American writers, with emphasis on the post-1945 period.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     K
SBC:     HUM, USA

3 credits

EGL 231: Saints and Fools

An introduction to literature about the lives of saints and the holy fool tradition in major texts of Russian and English literature. Emphasis is placed on the ways authors have used fundamental religious values of humility, the transcendent irrational, and kenosis to confront their own times. Authors considered range from monks to Dickens, Dumas, Chaucer, Gogol, and Pushkin; films include Murder in the Cathedral and Forrest Gump. This course is offered as both EGL 231 and HUR 231.

Advisory Prerequisite: one D.E.C. B or HUM course

DEC:     I
SBC:     CER, HFA+

3 credits

EGL 232: Rebels and Tyrants

An exploration of literary rebels and tyrants central to Russian and Anglo-American traditions. The subversive tactics of such writers as Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Sir Walter Scott, Solzhenitsyn, and Salinger are appraised in the light of the dominant social, political, and aesthetic systems they confront. This course offered as both EGL 232 and HUR 232.

Advisory Prerequisite: one D.E.C. B or HUM course

DEC:     I
SBC:     CER, HFA+

3 credits

EGL 243: Shakespeare: The Major Works

A study of major works in several genres and consideration of Shakespeare's precursors and his influence on the development of drama to the present. Designed for students who want a one-semester survey of Shakespeare.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

DEC:     I
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

EGL 249: African-American Literature and Music in the 19th and 20th Centuries

A detailed look at African-American literature and music and their importance for American literature and music of the 19th and 20th centuries. An examination of the literature with attention to the special stylistic devices, tones of literary voice, and characterization that writers use in their efforts to match the music experience with the written word. Selections from the recordings of African-American and African-American inspired musicians -- from Bessie Smith and Louis Armstrong to Jimi Henrix and the Rolling Stones.This course is offered as both AFH 249 and EGL 249.

Advisory Prerequisite: one D.E.C. category B or D course or one HUM or ARTS course

DEC:     K
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 260: Mythology in Literature

The analysis of myth in literature from antiquity to the present. The course explores literary texts that use mythic material, analyzes the irrational in myth, and examines the history of motifs, figures, and themes in myths that persist in Western literature.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     G
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

EGL 261: The Bible as Literature

A literary approach to the Bible that explores the characteristic principles of the Bible's narrative and poetic art. This course is offered as both EGL 261 and JDH 261.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     B
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

EGL 266: The 20th-Century Novel

Major works and developments in the modern and contemporary novel. This course is offered as both CLT 266 and EGL 266.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     G
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

EGL 274: Black American Literature

A survey of 19th- and 20th-century Black American literature. Particular attention is paid to the way in which themes of black literature reflect the historical developments of the time, especially the conditions before, during, and after the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement.

Prerequisite: WRT 102

DEC:     K
SBC:     HUM, USA

3 credits

EGL 276: Feminism: Literature and Cultural Contexts

An examination of works written by or about women reflecting conceptions of women in drama, poetry, and fiction. The course focuses on literature seen in relation to women's sociocultural and historical position. This course is offered as both EGL 276 and WST 276.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

DEC:     B
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

EGL 285: Writing Workshop: Fiction

A workshop in the development of skills in writing fiction through practice supplemented by readings.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; WRT 102

3 credits

EGL 286: Writing Workshop: Poetry

A workshop in the development of skills in writing poetry. Poetry writing is supplemented by readings.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; WRT 102

3 credits

EGL 300: Old English Literature

The study of Old English language and the literature written in it from its beginnings to the 11th century.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 205

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 301: Authors, Periods, Topics, or Genres, with Intensive Writing

Course in English literary or cultural studies, with an emphasis on analytic writing. This course is designed for English majors only.

Prerequisite: EGL 204

Pre- or corequisite: EGL 207

SBC:     WRTD

3 credits

EGL 302: Medieval Literature in English

Major authors, themes, and forms of British literature from the 13th to the early 16th century, usually excluding Chaucer.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 205

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 304: Renaissance Literature in English

The study of English literature of the 16th century.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 205

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 305: The Pacific, Travel & Empire

This cultural studies course examines the cultures of travel (i.e. fiction, memoirs, photography, and filmmaking) in narratives by and about the Pacific, South and Southeast Asia. We will study "empire" by analyzing narratives about the former colonies of Spain, France, Britain and the United States. As we discuss the metaphors or tropes of empire, we will also examine the concept of empire as a historical and contemporary formation, or what an empire meant in the 19th century and what it means today in the early 21st century. The course begins with the premise that travel narratives and modern visual culture illuminate the relationship between the violence and romance of travel. The course includes modern travel narratives (i.e. novels by Asian Americans) that focus on the lives of those who are forced to travel or migrate due to civil war, poverty and/or economic instability. This course is offered as AAS 305 and EGL 305.

Prerequisite: Any 200 and/or 300 level course offered by the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies or the English Department

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 306: English Literature of the 17th Century

The study of English literature from the late Renaissance to the age of Dryden.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 205

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 310: Neoclassical Literature in English

The study of English literature from about 1700 to 1790.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 206

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 312: Romantic Literature in English

The study of English literature from the end of the neoclassical period to the beginning of the Victorian Age, 1798-1832.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 206

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 314: Victorian Literature

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 206

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 316: Early American Literature

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 217

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+, USA

3 credits

EGL 318: 19th-Century American Literature

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 217

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+, USA

3 credits

EGL 320: Modern and Contemporary Literature

The study of literature in English from the year 1900 to the present; material may be drawn from British literature, American literature, or any other area that produces literature written in English.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 218, 224, or 226

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 321: Modern and Contemporary Literature

The study of literature in English from the year 1900 to the present; material may be drawn from British literature, American literature, or any other area that produces literature written in English.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 218, 224, or 226

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 322: Modern and Contemporary Literature

The study of literature in English from the year 1900 to the present; material may be drawn from British literature, American literature, or any other area that produces literature written in English.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 218, 224, or 226

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 333: The Italian-American Experience in Literature

Literary and historical perspectives on the experience of Italians in America and their contribution to American culture from the earliest wave of Italian immigration to the present day. This course offered as both EGL 333 and HUI 333.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     K
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 340: Chaucer

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 205

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 342: Milton

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 205

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 344: Major Writers of the Renaissance Period in England

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 205

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 345: Shakespeare I

A study of the comedies and the history plays. Designed to complement EGL 346.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 205 and 243

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 346: Shakespeare II

A study of the tragedies and the romances. Designed to complement EGL 345.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 205 and 243

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 347: Major Writers of the Neoclassical Period in England

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 206

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 348: Major Writers of the Romantic Period in England

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 206

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 349: Major Writers of the Victorian Period in England

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 206

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 350: Major Writers of American Literature, Colonial Period to 1900

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 217

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+, USA

3 credits

EGL 352: Major Writers of 20th-Century Literature in English

May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 218 or 224

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 354: Major Writers of Contemporary British and American Literature

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: EGL 204

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 226

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 360: Literature of Adolescence

The study of novels, short stories, and poetry about adolescence.

Prerequisite: EGL 441

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 361: Poetry in English

The study of the development of form, theme, and language of poetry in English. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 362: Drama in English

The study of the development of plot, structure, character, theme, and language of drama in English. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 363: Fiction in English

The study of the development of plot, structure, character, theme, and language of fiction in English. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 364: Prose in English

The study of the various forms of prose such as the essay, utopia, memoir, autobiography, biography, and nonfictional narrative. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 365: Literary Criticism and Theory

A survey of major texts and perspectives in literary criticism and theory.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 366: Topics in Literary Criticism and Theory

May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Pre- or Corequisite: EGL 204

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 367: Contemporary African-American Literature

The study of contemporary African-American literature focused in varying ways, including literary and cultural traditions, and relations to other writers and traditions in American literature.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: EGL 274 or AFH 206

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+, USA

3 credits

EGL 368: Caribbean and American Connections in Literature

An exploration of the connections between writers from the French-speaking and English-speaking Caribbean and from the African-American community, who share a similar cultural heritage, historical heritage, and historical experience, but differ in geopolitical situations. Special attention is paid to spirituality, gender, and identity motifs in the literature. This course is offered as both AFH 368 and EGL 368.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 369: Topics in Ethnic American Studies in Literature

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 371: Topics in Gender Studies in Literature

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 372: Topics in Women and Literature

The study of texts written by and about women and of issues they raise relating to gender and literature. May be repeated as the topic changes. This course is offered as both EGL 372 and WST 372.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 373: Literature in English from Non-Western Cultures

The study of literature in English from a nation or a region of the world that is significantly different from the United States and Europe. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 374: English Literature in Relation to Other Literatures

The study of literature in English as it affects and is affected by other literatures. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 375: Literature in English in Relation to Other Disciplines

The study of literature in English as it affects and is affected by other disciplines such as anthropology, science, sociology, the history of ideas, theology, and psychology. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 376: The Literature of Imperialism

A course in the history and culture of European imperialism as it is evidenced in the literary texts produced both by Europeans and by the indigenous populations they colonized. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 377: Literature in English in Relation to Other Disciplines

The study of literature in English as it affects and is affected by other disciplines such as anthropology, science, sociology, the history of ideas, theology, and psychology. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 378: Contemporary Native American Fiction

The study of novels by contemporary Native American writers with particular attention to the way these novels develop imaginative perspectives on contemporary culture and values.

Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 379: Native American Texts and Contexts

The study of Native American writings in a variety of genres, including autobiography, short stories, novels, poetry, the oral tradition, and history.

Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 381: Advanced Analytic and Argumentative Writing

Argumentative writing involves making a claim and supporting it with specific, related points and appropriate evidence--in other words, it is thesis-driven writing. Whenever we don't quite like someone else's idea and we want him or her to come closer to ours, argumentative writing is the most efficient method for such persuasion, in whatever profession you're considering. This class, therefore, will focus on learning how to effectively utilize argumentative and counter-argumentative writing strategies. Students will explore an area of disciplinary interest to them through several stages--proposal, preliminary draft, multiple versions, literature review--culminating in a 20-30 page piece of writing in which they make a claim about a particular subject in that area of interest and support it with scholarly research and extensive elaboration. This course will fulfill the second half of the Writing Pre-Med/Pre-Health prerequisite. This course is offered as both EGL 381 and WRT 381.

Prerequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent

3 credits

EGL 382: Black Women's Literature of the African Diaspora

Black women's literature presents students with the opportunity to examine through literature the political, social, and historical experiences of Black women from the African Diaspora. The course is structured around five major themes commonly addressed in Black women's writing: Black female oppression, sexual politics of Black womanhood, Black female sexuality, Black male/female relationships, and Black women and defining self. This course is offered as AFH 382, EGL 382, and WST 382.

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 385: Advanced Fiction Workshop

A fiction writing workshop. Students receive detailed criticism of their work. May be repeated with permission of the director of undergraduate studies.

Prerequisites: EGL 285; permission of instructor

3 credits

EGL 386: Advanced Poetry Workshop

A poetry writing workshop. Students receive detailed criticism of their work. May be repeated with permission of the director of undergraduate studies.

Prerequisites: EGL 286; permission of instructor

3 credits

EGL 387: Playwrighting

A workshop devoted to planning and writing finished scripts for the stage. This course offered as both EGL 387 and THR 326.

Prerequisite: WRT 102; one D.E.C. B or HUM course; one D.E.C. D or ARTS course

3 credits

EGL 388: Interdisciplinary Topics

Course on English literary and cultural studies in connection with other disciplines. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: WRT 102

3 credits

EGL 389: Science Fiction

The literary genre called Science Fiction enables us to explore our nature, and that of the universe we inhabit, by postulating worlds, cultures and technologies that do not (yet) exist, but could, and the consequences thereof. This course focuses on the sub-genre called hard science fiction, in which the science/technology is more or less plausible. Students should be prepared to address the genre from both its scientific and literary sides. This course is offered as both AST 389 and EGL 389.

Prerequisite: WRT 102; one D.E.C. B or HUM course; one D.E.C. E or SNW course

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

EGL 390: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 391: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies in American or Anglophone Literature

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 392: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies in Literature Pre-1800

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 393: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 394: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies of Science and Technology

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     H
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 395: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies of Europe

Past topics have included titles such as Modern European Drama; War Poetry; and Ancient to Modern Fictional Narrative. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to Western civilization. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the development of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of Western civilization, and relate it to that of other regions in the world. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     I
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 397: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America

Topics may include titles such as South African Women Writers; Contemporary Latino Fiction; and Haiku in Japanese Society. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to non-Western world civilizations. Students will be expected to demonstrate either a knowledge of a broad outline of world history, or the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of one non-Western civilization. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 398: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America

Topics may include titles such as South African Women Writers; Contemporary Latino Fiction; and Haiku in Japanese Society. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to non-Western world civilizations. Students will be expected to demonstrate either a knowledge of a broad outline of world history, or the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of one non-Western civilization. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 399: Topics in American Literary and Cultural Studies

Topics in U.S. lliterary and cultural studies, placed within a broad historical context, including social, political, economic, and cultural history and institutions. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher

DEC:     K
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

EGL 440: Performance and Technology in Teaching Literature and Composition

Introduction to the teaching of literature and composition through the use of classroom performance and technology, including film, video, and other media as well as computers and the Internet.

Prerequisite: C or higher in EGL 441; acceptance into the English Teacher Preparation Program

Corequisite: Equivalent section of EGL 450

3 credits

EGL 441: Methods of Instruction in Literature and Composition

Consideration of specific problems in the teaching of English, e.g., posing questions about literary texts and commenting on student papers. There is frequent use of writing by secondary school students, and the goals of instruction in literature and language are examined. Required of students seeking certification in secondary school English.

Prerequisite: Admission to the English Teacher Preparation Program

Corequisite: Equivalent section of EGL 449

3 credits

EGL 449: Field Experience, Grades 7-12

Observation, inquiry, and practice in English education at the secondary level including 50 hours of documented visitations and observation at documented sites. Field experience writing logs are the basis for group discussion. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading.

Corequisite: Equivalent section of EGL 441

SBC:     EXP+

1 credit, S/U grading

EGL 450: Field Experience, Grades 7-12

Observation, inquiry, and practice in English education at the secondary level including 50 hours of documented visitations and observation at documented sites. Field experience writing logs are the basis for group discussion. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading.

SBC:     EXP+

1 credit, S/U grading

EGL 451: Supervised Student Teaching - English; Middle Level Grades 7-9

Prerequisites: Enrollment in English Teacher Preparation Program; permission of instructor

Corequisites: Equivalent sections of EGL 452 and 454

6 credits, S/U grading

EGL 452: Supervised Student Teaching - English; High School Grades 10-12

Prerequisites: Enrollment in English Teacher Preparation Program; permission of instructor

Corequisites: equivalent sections of EGL 451 and 454

6 credits, S/U grading

EGL 454: Student Teaching Seminar

Seminar on problems and issues of teaching English at the secondary school level. Analysis of actual responsibilities and issues encountered by the teacher candidate in the student teaching experience.

Prerequisite: C or higher in EGL 441

Corequisites: Equivalent sections of EGL 451 and 452

3 credits

EGL 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; 12 credits in English; permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

EGL 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have been graded. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisite: EGL 475; permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

EGL 487: Independent Project

Intensive study of a special topic undertaken with close faculty supervision. Request for project approval of undergraduate studies committee must be submitted no later than the last week of classes of the prior semester. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies

0-6 credits

EGL 488: Internship

Participation in local, state, and national public and private organization. The work must involve skills related to the educational goals of the department. Request for approval of the undergraduate studies committee for internships must be submitted no later than the last week of classes of the prior semester.

Prerequisites: 12 credits of English; 2.50 g.p.a.; permission of instructor and department

SBC:     EXP+

0-6 credits, S/U grading

EGL 490: Honors Seminar: Literary Studies

Honors seminar on a topic in literature and culture.

Prerequisite: Admission to English Honors Program; EGL 204

3 credits

EGL 491: Honors Seminar: British Literature before 1800

Honors seminar on a topic in pre-1800 British literature and culture.

Prerequisite: Admission to English Honors Program; EGL 204

3 credits

EGL 492: Honors Seminar: American Literature

Honors seminar on a topic in American literature and culture.

Prerequisite: Admission to English Honors Program; EGL 204

3 credits

EGL 494: Honors Practicum: Research

Honors practicum for students interested in focusing on the development of research skills.

Prerequisite: Admission to English Honors Program; EGL 204

3 credits

EGL 495: Honors Practicum for Writing Assistants

Honors practicum for students interested in focusing on the development of pedagogical skills centered on the teaching of writing.

Prerequisites: Admission to English Honors Program; EGL 204; 301

3 credits

EGL 496: Senior Honors Project

Prerequisites: EGL 490; permission of department

3 credits

FLA: Foreign Language Teacher Preparation

FLA 339: Methods and Materials in the Teaching of Foreign Languages

A review of methods and materials for the teaching of foreign languages and literatures in the secondary schools. Special attention is given to the problems and purposes of the teaching of foreign languages at the high school level.

Prerequisites: Admission to a Foreign Language Teacher Preparation program; C or higher in one 300-level foreign language course; C or higher in one 300-level literature course; minumum GPA of 2.75

Corequisite: FLA 449

3 credits

FLA 340: Curriculum Development and Micro-Teaching

A course designed to train future language teachers in the development of well-articulated programs in secondary schools. Students have the opportunity to enjoy clinical experiences in school settings. Special attention is given to lesson planning, classroom management, and portfolio development.

Prerequisites: C or higher in FLA 339; minimum g.p.a. of 2.75

Corequisite: FLA 450

3 credits

FLA 439: Technology Literacy for Foreign Language Teachers

FLA 439 is designed as a course to improve the technological literacy of all future language teachers. In this course, teacher candidates will explore in a very hands-on, practical and applied manner all of the technologies used by teachers of languages. The class will also discuss how the technologies relate to current language pedagogies, both for individualized and classroom learning, especially as these issues can be discussed in a very applied and pragmatic manner.

Prerequisite: FLA 339

3 credits

FLA 440: Foreign Language Acquisition Research

A study of recent trends in foreign language acquisition research. The focus is on classroom-based research: qualitative and quantitative research methodologies, variables in classroom-based learning research, analysis of research results. Students conduct classroom research studies, present their findings, and address applications of their findings to classroom teachers and learners of foreign languages.

Prerequisites: FLA 339; acceptance into a foreign language secondary teacher preparation program

3 credits

FLA 449: Field Experience, Grades 7-12

Observation, inquiry, and practice in foreign language education at the secondary level including 50 hours of documented visitations and observation at documented sites. Field experience writing logs are the basis for group discussion. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading.

Prerequisites: Admission to a Foreign Language Teacher Preparation program; minimum GPA 2.75

Corequisite: FLA 339

SBC:     EXP+

1 credit, S/U grading

FLA 450: Field Experience, Grades 7-12

Observation, inquiry, and practice in foreign language education at the secondary level including 50 hours of documented visitations and observation at documented sites. Field experience writing logs are the basis for group discussion. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading.

SBC:     EXP+

1 credit, S/U grading

FLA 451: Supervised Student Teaching: Middle School Level Grades 7-9

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Foreign Language Teacher Preparation Program; permission of instructor

Corequisites: FLA 452 and 454

SBC:     EXP+

6 credits, S/U grading

FLA 452: Supervised Student Teaching: High School Grades 10-12

Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Foreign Language Teacher Preparation Program; permission of instructor

Corequisite: FLA 451 and 454

6 credits, S/U grading

FLA 454: Student Teaching Seminar

Seminar on problems encountered by student teachers and public school teachers at the secondary level in foreign language teaching. Study and analysis of the many aspects of the foreign language teaching profession, such as individualized teaching, testing, and professional organizations.

Prerequisite: C or higher in FLA 340

Corequisites: FLA 451 and 452

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits

JPN: Japanese Language

JPN 101: Intensive Elementary Japanese

An intensive, 6-credit, elementary-level Japanese language course that provides foundational knowledge and skills including pronunciation, basic everyday conversational proficiency, principles of character formation, basic grammatical rules, and basic cultural norms and preferences that govern language use. Drawing upon a communicative approach, this course situates oral and written language in real-life contexts and promotes learner-centered, interactive classroom activities. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Japanese in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take JPN 101 without written permission from the supervisor of the course. May not be taken for credit after any other course in Japanese.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     LANG

6 credits

JPN 111: Elementary Japanese I

An introduction to spoken and written Japanese with equal attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Linguistic analysis of the characters provides cultural and historical background of the language. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Japanese in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take JPN 111 without written permission from the supervisor of the course.

4 credits

JPN 112: Elementary Japanese II

An introduction to spoken and written Japanese with equal attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Linguistic analysis of the characters provides cultural and historical background of the language. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Japanese in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take JPN 112 without written permission from the supervisor of the course.

Prerequisite: JPN 111 or placement into 112. See https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     LANG

4 credits

JPN 201: Intensive Intermediate Japanese

An intensive, 6-credit, Intermediate-level Japanese language course that offers foundational knowledge and skills at the intermediate level, including conversational proficiency, orthography, grammatical rules, and essential cultural norms and preferences that govern language use. Drawing upon a communicative approach, this course situates oral and written language in real-life contexts and promotes learner-centered, interactive classroom activities. May not be taken for credit in addition to JPN 211 or JPN 212.

Prerequisite: JPN 112 or placement into 201 or 211. See https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     GLO, HUM

6 credits

JPN 211: Intermediate Japanese I

An intermediate course in Japanese language to develop audiolingual skills and reading and writing ability. Selected literary texts serve as the basis for practice in reading comprehension and composition. A student who has had three or more years of Japanese in high school (or has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not enroll in JPN 211 without written permission from the supervisor of the course.

Prerequisite: JPN 112 or placement into 201 or 211. See https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     GLO

4 credits

JPN 212: Intermediate Japanese II

An intermediate course in Japanese language to develop audiolingual skills and reading and writing ability. Selected literary texts serve as the basis for practice in reading comprehension and composition. A student who has had three or more years of Japanese in high school (or has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not enroll in JPN 212 without written permission from the supervisor of the course.

Prerequisite: JPN 211 or placement into 212. See https://llrc.stonybrook.edu/placement-exams for more information.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

JPN 311: Advanced Japanese I

An advanced course designed to strengthen students' ability to understand and speak the Japanese language. Students are required to prepare selected texts and to read and translate them in class. They also write essays based on the texts as well as on Japanese videos.

Prerequisite: JPN 212

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

JPN 312: Advanced Japanese II

An advanced course designed to strengthen students' ability to understand and speak the Japanese language. Students are required to prepare selected texts and to read and translate them in class. They also write essays based on the texts as well as on Japanese videos.

Prerequisite: JPN 311

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

JPN 331: Social Sciences Topics in Japanese Studies

An investigation of a specific area of Japanese studies in the social and behavioral sciences. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes. Previously offered as JNS 331.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisites: Two courses in Asian studies

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

JPN 332: Humanities Topics in Japanese Studies

An investigation of a specific area of Japanese studies in the humanities. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisites: Two courses in Asian studies

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

JPN 410: Business Japanese

A course designed for students who wish to expand their Japanese communication skills in a business context and understand socio-economic situations as well as socio-cultural values in Japan. Upon completing this course, students will be able to hold conversations with correct business vocabulary and with culturally appropriate manners, read authentic materials related to business and economics in Japan, and write business correspondence in proper styles and formats.

Prerequisite: JPN 312 or equivalent

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

JPN 411: Advanced Japanese III

An advanced course designed for the fourth-year students of Japanese to strengthen their ability to understand, speak, read, and write Japanese. Students will read a variety of Japanese texts including newspaper/magazine articles, biographies, and literary works and write creatively and/or professionally using sophisticated vocabulary and advanced kanji characters. Students will also be trained to comprehend authentic spoken Japanese, using a variety of audio-visual materials and to communicate in Japanese, applying appropriate socio-cultural norms. Not intended for international students from Japan who are part of a two-plus-two or exchange program.

Prerequisite: JPN 312 or placement test

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

JPN 412: Advanced Japanese IV

An advanced course designed for the fourth-year students of Japanese to strengthen their ability to understand, speak, read, and write Japanese. Students will read a variety of Japanese texts including newspaper/magazine articles, biographies, and literary works and write creatively and/or professionally using sophisticated vocabulary and advanced kanji characters. Students will also be trained to comprehend authentic spoken Japanese, using a variety of audio-visual materials and to communicate in Japanese, applying appropriate socio-cultural norms. Not intended for international students from Japan who are part of a two-plus-two or exchange program.

Prerequisite: JPN 411 or placement test

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

JPN 426: Structure of Japanese

The study of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, lexicon, and writing systems of the Japanese language as well as the use and functions of the language in relation to the social structures and interpersonal relationships.

Prerequisite: JPN 312 or permission of instructor

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

JPN 447: Independent Study

Directed reading and research in Japanese studies. Limited to Japanese studies minors or upper-division students working on advanced problems in Japanese studies. May be repeated. Previously offered as JNH and JNS 447.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; permission of instructor

1-6 credits

JPN 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Prerequisites: Fluency in Japanese; U4 standing; permission of instructor

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

JPN 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisites: JPN 475; permission of instructor

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

JPN 487: Independent Research

An individual research project in Japanese, such as translation, analysis of documents or literature, etc., in consultation with the instructor. Students are expected to meet at regular intervals and to present the completed project at the end of the semester. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: Interview; permission of instructor

0-3 credits

JPN 488: Internship

Participation in a local, state, or federal governmental agency or community organization. Students are required to submit progress reports to their department sponsor and a final report on their experience to the department faculty. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and undergraduate program director

SBC:     EXP+

0-6 credits, S/U grading

LIN: Linguistics

LIN 101: Human Language

An introduction to the fundamental areas and concepts of modern linguistics. Sounds and their structure, word structure, and sentence structure are discussed. Other topics may include historical linguistics (how languages change over time), dialects, writing systems, language and the brain, and psycholinguistics (especially the question of how children acquire a language).

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS, SNW

3 credits

LIN 110: The Anatomy of English Words

An introduction to the analysis of complex words in English, especially those based on Latin and Greek models that comprise the majority of the vocabulary in the written language. Students will be introduced to Latin and Greek roots and the processes by which complex words are built by affixing material to these roots and modifying their structure. Students will acquire general analytical tools that will allow them to understand complex words that they may not have previously encountered. The course will introduce students to principles of linguistic morphology that extend beyond English to all human languages.

3 credits

LIN 200: Language in the United States

Survey of the languages and language-related issues in the United States. Topics include Native American languages; immigrant languages; dialectal variations (e.g., Black English); the domains in which these languages were and are used; maintenance and loss of minority languages; language contact and its effects; the use of Spanish; language attitudes and politics is including bilingual education; and official language movements. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of American English from colonial times to its present world-wide status; the use and impact of Spanish; language attitudes and politics including bilingual education; and official language movements.

DEC:     K
SBC:     SBS, USA

3 credits

LIN 201: Phonetics

Introduction to the sounds used in human language. Topics include articulatory phonetics, phonetic transcription, the sound structure of English, sounds and sound patterns in languages of the world, the acoustic properties of sounds, speech perception, and speech technology. Includes work in the phonetics laboratory on computer analysis of speech.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

4 credits

LIN 250: Languages and Cultures of Asian Americans

Study of language use and cultural accommodation in selected Asian American communities in relation to the changing roles of Asians in U.S. society from the early democracy to the present. Issues include linguistic and cultural diversity of Asia and Asian Americans; comparison of Asian and European immigration patterns; struggle for equality and acceptance; cultural factors in assimilation; patterns of Asian language use and maintenance in various domains; the role of language in ethnic identity; attitudes toward English and bilingualism; bilingualism as a problem and as a resource. This course is offered as both AAS 250 and LIN 250.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category A

DEC:     K
SBC:     SBS, USA

3 credits

LIN 300: Writing in Linguistics

Majors in linguistics refine their skills in writing for the discipline by critiquing successive revisions of previously written work.

Prerequisites: Major in linguistics; U3 or U4 standing

SBC:     ESI, WRTD

2 credits

LIN 301: Phonology

An introduction to the sound systems of languages focusing on the mental representation of sound structure: how speakers use knowledge of their language to assign meaning to different combinations of sounds. We will examine data from a number of languages to explore the differences and similarities among the sound patterns of different languages, and will consider the question of whether there are universal preferences for specific types of sounds and sound sequences.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 201

4 credits

LIN 307: Sociolinguistics

An examination of the interaction between language and society, focusing on diversity in American English as it relates to differences in gender, geography, social class, ethnicity, and national origin. Study of the development of dialects including African-American Vernacular English, and pidgins and creoles such as Hawiian Pidgin English and Chinook Trade Jargon, within the context of historical developments in the U.S. from colonial times to the present.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101

DEC:     K
SBC:     ESI, SBS+

3 credits

LIN 308: Language Variation and Change

An introduction to the quantitative study of language variation and language change.

Prerequisite: LIN 101 and LIN 201

3 credits

LIN 311: Syntax

An introduction to generative grammar: the formal theory of sentence structure.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101

DEC:     F

4 credits

LIN 320: English Grammar

This course is a systematic survey of English grammar: its major structures, their interaction, and their use. It will also briefly examine some related areas connected to writing like punctuation and spelling.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101

3 credits

LIN 330: Language Acquisition

Introduction to the field of language acquisition. Issues include cognitive processes, role of innate ability and environment, developmental stages, individual variation, universal tendencies, interaction of language and cognition, bilingualism, similarities and differences between first- and second-language acquisition, and language disorders.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 201 and LIN 311

SBC:     ESI, SBS+, STEM+

3 credits

LIN 340: Historical Linguistics

The application of linguistic theory to the ways in which sound systems, word structure, and sentence structure change. Students learn how linguists establish that certain languages are related, and how they reconstruct prehistoric parent languages.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 301 and LIN 311

3 credits

LIN 344: Literacy Development

An introduction to the theories of literacy and their application in education. Students acquire knowledge about the complex nature of academic literacy; how literacy skills can be taught and assessed across all disciplines, and how literacy and language skills develop among diverse learners, including students with special needs and English Language Learners. Attention is given to the integration of technology into the development of literacy skills. Not for major credit.

Prerequisite: Admission to a teacher education program

3 credits

LIN 345: Writing Systems of the World

A survey of the major types of writing including (but not limited to) alphabetic, syllabic, and logographic systems; the invention of writing; changes in writing systems over time and the decipherment of ancient writing. Special attention is given to modern English spelling, including both its regular, systematic properties and the historical background of its irregularities.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

LIN 346: Language and Meaning

An exploration of semantics, the study of linguistic meaning. The course examines fundamental issues including the nature of meaning, its relation to word and sentence form (morphology and syntax), its relation to systems of mental representation (cognition), and the interaction between meaning and use (pragmatics). Recent research into the way that linguistic meaning is acquired and how it is deployed in speech and understanding is discussed.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 101

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

4 credits

LIN 347: Pragmatics

A study of those aspects of natural language meaning that arise from, or are dependent upon, use. Core topics include implicatures, presupposition, speech acts, deixis, their interaction with semantics and syntax, and their implications for certain discourse phenomena, including politeness, turn taking, and verbal abuse.

Prerequisite: LIN 101

Advisory pre- or co-requisites: LIN 311 and LIN 346

3 credits

LIN 355: Language and Life in a Selected Area of the World

Study of the languages of a selected country or region outside of Europe in relation to its society, culture, history, and politics. Topics include language family, social varieties, status and attitudes, language policies, and cultural patterns reflected in language use. May be repeated as the topic changes. LIN 355 and/or LIN 356 may be taken a total of two times for the major.

Advisory Prerequisite: LIN 101

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, SBS+

3 credits

LIN 356: Topics in Language and Life in Europe

Focus will be on the language of a particular country or region in Europe and the relationship between language and the society, culture, history, and politics of the country or region. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to Western civilization. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the development of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of Western civilization, and relate it to that of other regions in the world. May be repeated as the language examined changes. May be repeated as the topic changes. LIN 355 and/or LIN 356 may be taken a total of two times for the major.

Prerequisite: one LIN course or satisfaction of Skill 3 or LANG

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO, SBS+

3 credits

LIN 370: Intercultural Communication

Through combination of theory and research from discourse linguistics and linguistic anthropology, this course examines (i) how culture shapes ways of speaking; (ii) how language constructs identities, dispositions, role relations; and (iii) what challenges people from different cultures may face when they communicate with each other. The following analytical perspectives will be presented: speech act theory, ethnography of communication, linguistic politeness, and sequential organization of turn taking. This course is offered as both AAS 370 and LIN 370.

Prerequisite: one previous course in D.E.C. J or SBS+ or one previous course in Linguistics

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

LIN 375: TESOL Pedagogy: Theory and Practice

Introduction to language and literacy instruction, instructional approaches, and assessment models for the teaching of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students design standard-based lessons and evaluate resources and technologies.

Prerequisite: Declared major in Linguistics; C or higher in LIN 101, 201, or 311; G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher; for non-native speakers of English, a TOEFL-iBT Speaking Component score of 28

Corequisite: LIN 449

3 credits

LIN 378: Content-Based Language and Literacy Development

Introduction to language and literacy development across disciplines and to assessment, cooperative learning, and reflective practices. Students will develop standard-based interdisciplinary thematic units, integrate technologies, and explore collaborative practices.

Prerequisite: LIN 375 and LIN 449

Corequisite: LIN 450

3 credits

LIN 380: Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing

A study of the anatomy and physiology of the speech, swallowing, and hearing mechanisms, including the phonatory, articulatory, respiratory, and resonatory subsystems and the neural control.

Prerequisite: LIN 101 and LIN 201

SBC:     STEM+

3 credits

LIN 381: Language and Speech Disorders

Overview of developmental and acquired communication disorders across the lifespan, including language delay, developmental apraxia of speech, phonological disorders, stuttering, acquired aphasia, craniofacial anomalies, and voice disorders.

Prerequisite: LIN 101 and LIN 201

SBC:     STEM+

3 credits

LIN 382: Audiology

Survey of the field of audiology, including the physics of sound, the physiology of hearing, the nature and causes of hearing impairment.

Prerequisite: LIN 101 and LIN 201

SBC:     STEM+

3 credits

LIN 425: Special Topics in Linguistics

Seminars for advanced linguistics students. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Varies with subject matter

3 credits

LIN 426: Special Topics in Linguistics

Seminars for advanced linguistics students. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Varies with subject matter

3 credits

LIN 427: Special Topics in Linguistics

Seminars for advanced linguistics students. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Varies with subject matter

3 credits

LIN 431: The Structure of an Uncommonly Taught Language

An investigation of the phonology and syntax of either a language or a family of languages. May be repeated if a different language is covered.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 301 and LIN 311

SBC:     CER, SBS+, SPK

4 credits

LIN 447: Directed Readings in Linguistics

Qualified juniors and seniors in linguistics are offered an opportunity to do independent work on topics in linguistics under guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated to a limit of six credits.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

1-6 credits

LIN 449: Field Experience, Grades N-12

Observation, inquiry, and practice in language and literacy development across disciplines for learners from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds. Students are placed in variety of educational settings in elementary and secondary schools for 50 hours of fieldwork.

Prerequisites: Declared major in Linguistics; C or higher in LIN 101, 201, or 211; G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher; for non-native speakers of English, a TOEFL-iBT Speaking Component Score of 28

Corequisite: LIN 375

SBC:     EXP+

1 credit, S/U grading

LIN 450: Field Experience, Grades N-12

Observation, inquiry, and practice in language and literacy development across disciplines for learners from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds. Students are placed in variety of educational settings in elementary and secondary schools for 50 hours of fieldwork.

Corequisite: LIN 378

SBC:     EXP+

1 credit, S/U grading

LIN 451: Supervised Teaching -- English as a Second Language: Primary Grades N-6

Supervised practice teaching in English as a second language by arrangement with selected Boards of Cooperative Educational Services and primary, middle, and secondary schools. Applications must be filed in the academic year preceding that in which the student plans to take the course.

Prerequisites: Linguistics major; GPA of 3.0 or higher; permission of department

SBC:     EXP+

6 credits, S/U grading

LIN 452: Supervised Student Teaching in English as a Second Language: Secondary Grades 7-12

Supervised practice teaching in English as a second language by arrangement with selected Boards of Cooperative Educational Services and middle and secondary schools. Applications must be filed in the academic year preceding that in which the student plans to take the course.

Prerequisites: Linguistics major; GPA of 3.0 or higher; permission of department

SBC:     EXP+

6 credits, S/U grading

LIN 454: Managing Instruction, Assessment, and Resources

Examination of effective practices, assessments, and technologies for developing language and literacy across content areas in multi-level classrooms. Collaboration with colleagues, parents, and communities is explored.

Prerequisite: C or higher in LIN 378; permission of department

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits

LIN 464: Morphology and Word Formation

The internal structure of complex words. A variety of analytical methods is introduced, together with examples from English and many other languages.

Prerequisite: C or better in LIN 301 and LIN 311

3 credits

LIN 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student in required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. Not for major credit.

Prerequisites: Linguistics major; U3 or U4 standing; permission of instructor.

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

LIN 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an asistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice. Not for major credit.

Prerequisite: LIN 475; permission of instructor

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

LIN 487: Directed Research in Linguistics

Qualified advanced undergraduates in linguistics may carry out individual research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated up to a limit of six credits.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

1-6 credits

LIN 488: Internship

Participation in local, state, and national public and private agencies and organizations. May be repeated up to a total of 12 credits. Not for major credit.

Prerequisites: 15 credits in linguistics; permission of department

SBC:     EXP+

0-6 credits, S/U grading

LIN 495: Senior Honors Project in Linguistics

First course of a two-semester sequence for linguistics majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. The project involves independent readings or research and the writing of a thesis. Students enrolled in LIN 495 are obliged to complete LIN 496 the next semester. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence. Not for major credit.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Linguistics Honors Program

3 credits

LIN 496: Senior Honors Project in Linguistics

Second course of a two-semester sequence for linguistics majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. The project involves independent readings or research and the writing of a thesis. Students enrolled in LIN 495 are obliged to complete LIN 496 the next semester. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence. Not for major credit.

3 credits

MAE: Mathematics Teacher Preparation

MAE 301: Foundations of Secondary School Mathematics

A re-examination of elements of school mathematics, including topics in algebra, geometry, and elementary functions. Competence in basic secondary-level ideas and techniques are tested.

Prerequisites: MAT 200 and 211; admission to mathematics or applied mathematics secondary teacher preparation program

Corequisite: MAE 311

3 credits

MAE 302: Methods and Materials for Teaching Secondary School Mathematics

The goals of mathematics education, learning theories, mathematics curricula, lesson planning, evaluation and teaching strategies. Lesson plans are drawn up and presented to the group.

Prerequisites: MAE 301 and C or higher in MAE 311

Pre- or Corequisite: MAE 312

SBC:     SPK

3 credits

MAE 311: Introduction to Methods of Teaching Secondary School Mathematics

Aspects of teaching mathematics on the secondary school level, including lesson designs based on the NCTM standards, cooperative learning, and technology in mathematics education. Students observe classes in middle school and high school settings.

Prerequisites: MAT 211; admission to mathematics or applied mathematics secondary teacher preparation program; department consent

Corequisite: MAE 301

3 credits

MAE 312: Micro-Teaching

Twice-weekly supervised classroom experience, tutoring, or working with small groups of students as a teacher's aide.

Prerequisite: C or higher in MAE 311

Pre- or Corequisite: MAE 302

2 credits

MAE 330: Technology in Mathematics Education

Introduces students in the secondary mathematics teacher preparation program to techniques and requirements for effective use of technology in the mathematics classroom. Emphasis on projects. Use of graphing calculators and computer software such as Geometer's Sketchpad.

Prerequisites: MAE 301 and 311

SBC:     TECH

3 credits

MAE 412: Issues in Teaching and Learning in Collegiate Mathematics

Investigation of the issues involved in the teaching and learning of introductory collegiate mathematics. A supervised teaching internship of undergraduate mathematics accompanies this seminar.

Prerequisite: MAE 302

4 credits

MAE 447: Directed Readings in Mathematics Education

Tutorial studies concerning current issues in mathematics education, including recent research and topics in the history of mathematics and their relation to teaching practice.

Pre- or Corequisite: MAE 312

1 credit

MAE 451: Supervised Teaching - Middle School Level Grades 7-9

Intensive supervised teaching in secondary schools. Students work in the school under the supervision of an experienced teacher.

Prerequisites: MAE 312; MAT 312, 319 and 360; AMS 310; permission of director of mathematics teacher education program

Corequisites: MAE 452 and 454

SBC:     EXP+

6 credits, S/U grading

MAE 452: Supervised Teaching - High School Grades 10-12

Intensive supervised teaching in secondary schools. Students work in the school under the supervision of an experienced teacher.

Prerequisites: MAE 312; MAT 312, 319 and 360; AMS 310; permission of director of mathematics teacher education program

Corequisites: MAE 451 and 454

SBC:     EXP+

6 credits, S/U grading

MAE 454: Student Teaching Seminar

Weekly discussions of teaching techniques and experiences, learning theory, curriculum content, and classroom problems.

Corequisites: MAE 451 and 452

3 credits

SCI: Science Teacher Preparation

SCI 410: Pedagogy and Methods for Science Education I

Fundamental science teaching strategies, theories, and practices are introduced to students. Implementation of the New York State Math, Science, and Technology Standards and core science curricula is emphasized, in addition to the importance of inquiry based learning, nature of science, laboratory activities, and laboratory safety. Students plan lessons and make several presentations. Experiences in SCI 449 are incorporated into SCI 410.

Prerequisites: Acceptance to a Science Teacher Preparation program; minimum G.P.A. of 2.75

Corequisite: SCI 449 Note: you must register for the same sections of SCI 410 and 449

3 credits

SCI 420: Pedagogy and Methods for Science Education II

Builds on the practical application of science pedagogy introduced in SCI 410. Advanced science teaching strategies are presented. Emphasis is placed on the integration of theory and practice, extension of scientific inquiry for diverse learners and assessment of student progress. Essential themes and critical issues in the science disciplines are explored in the context of teaching in secondary schools. Experiences in SCI 450 are incorporated into SCI 420.

Prerequisites: C or higher in SCI 410; satisfactory completion of SCI 449; minimum G.P.A. of 2.75

Corequisite: SCI 450

3 credits

SCI 447: Directed Readings in Science Education

Advanced study in science education under the supervision of a science education faculty member.

Prerequisite: Permission of the science education program

1-6 credits

SCI 449: Field Experience, Grades 7-12

Students visit science classes in secondary schools and participate in selected school-based outreach programs for a total of 50 hours during the semester. The observations made during these visits serve as the basis for assignments that are completed in SCI 410, as well as for discussions that occur in class. Due to public school schedules, the majority of these experiences occur during morning hours.

Prerequisites: Acceptance to a Science Teacher Preparation program; minimum G.P.A. of 2.75

Corequisite: SCI 410 Note: you must register for the same sections of SCI 410 and 449

1 credit, S/U grading

SCI 450: Field Experience, Grades 7-12

Students visit science classes in secondary schools and participate in selected school-based outreach programs for a total of 50 hours during the semester. The observations made during these visits serve as the basis for discussions that occur in SCI 420. Due to public school schedules, the majority of these experiences occur during morning hours.

Prerequisites: C or higher in SCI 410; satisfactory completion of SCI 449; minimum G.P.A. of 2.75

Corequisite: SCI 420 Note: you must register for the same sections of SCI 420 and 450

1 credit, S/U grading

SCI 451: Supervised Teaching-Science: Middle Level Grades 7-9

Prospective science teachers participate in full-time supervised student teaching in partnership schools, grades 7-9. Frequent consultation with the University supervisor helps the student interpret and evaluate the teaching experience. Applications must be filed in the semester preceding student teaching.

Prerequisites: C or higher in SCI 420; PSY 327; SSE 350; LIN 344; CEF 347; satisfactory in SCI 450; 2.75 cum G.P.A.; all grad reqs; dept permission. Corequisites: SCI 452 & 454 Note: students must register for equivalent sections of SCI 451, 452, 454

6 credits, S/U grading

SCI 452: Supervised Teaching-Science: High School Grades 10-12

Prospective science teachers participate in full-time supervised student teaching in partnership schools, grades 10-12. Frequent consultation with the University supervisor helps the student interpret and evaluate the teaching experience. Applications must be filed in the semester preceding student teaching.

Prerequisites: C or higher in SCI 420; SSE 350, PSY 327; LIN 344; & CEF 347; 'S' grade in SCI 450; cum G.P.A. 2.75; completion of all grad reqs; dept. perm. Corequisites: SCI 451/454; students must register for equivalent sections of SCI 451, 452, 454.

6 credits, S/U grading

SCI 454: Science Student Teaching Seminar

Includes discussions of teaching techniques that are critical to success as a science teacher, such as classroom management and effective questioning techniques. Analysis of actual problems and issues encountered by the student in his or her student teaching experience are part of each seminar session.

Prerequisites: C or higher in SCI 420; SSE 350, PSY 327; LIN 344; and CEF 347; 2.75 cum GPA; completion/grad reqs; Dept perm. Corequisites: SCI 451 and 452; Note: students must register/equiv sections of SCI 451, 452, 454.

3 credits

SCI 487: Applied Research

Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.

Prerequisite: Permission of science education program

SBC:     EXP+

0-3 credits

SSE: Social Studies Education

SSE 100: Economics for Social Studies Teachers

An introduction to the principles of micro- and macroeconomics for students planning to become social studies teachers. The course will focus on economic concepts and reasoning with the goal of teaching prospective teachers how to apply these ideas to important public policy issues. Not for economics major credit. Formerly ECO 100. Not for credit in addition to ECO 100.

Prerequisite: Admission to the teacher preparation program in social studies

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS

3 credits

SSE 350: Foundations of Education

An interdisciplinary study of the foundations of education focusing on the findings of the social and behavioral sciences as related to education and teaching. The course is designed to meet the needs of students enrolled in the secondary teacher preparation programs.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

3 credits

SSE 397: Teaching Social Studies

Social studies as taught in the secondary schools: the nature of the social studies, curricula models, scope and sequence of topics offered, new programs of social studies instruction, etc. Designed for prospective teachers of social studies in secondary schools.

Prerequisites: Admission to a Social Studies Teacher Preparation program;

Corequisite: SSE 449 (formerly SSI 449)

3 credits

SSE 398: Social Studies Teaching Strategies

An examination of the instructional methods and materials for teaching social studies at the secondary school level. Designed for prospective teachers of social studies in secondary schools.

Prerequisite: Admission into a Social Studies Teacher Preparation program; C or higher in SSE 397 (formerly SSI 397)

Corequisite: SSE 450 (formerly SSI 450)

3 credits

SSE 447: Directed Readings in Social Studies Education

Individually supervised reading in selected topics of the social sciences. May be repeated, but total credit may not exceed more than six credits.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

1-3 credits

SSE 449: Field Experience, Grades 7-12

Observation, inquiry, and practice in social studies education at the secondary level including 50 hours of documented visitations and observation at documented sites. Field experience writing logs are the basis for group discussion. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading.

Prerequisites: Admission to a Social Studies Teacher Preparation program;

Corequisite: SSE 397 (formerly SSI 397)

SBC:     EXP+

1 credit, S/U grading

SSE 450: Field Experience, Grades 7-12

Observation, inquiry, and practice in social studies education at the secondary level including 50 hours of documented visitations and observation at documented sites. Field experience writing logs are the basis for group discussion. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading.

Prerequisite: Admission to a Social Studies Teacher Preparation program

Corequisite: SSE 398 (formerly SSI 398)

SBC:     EXP+

1 credit, S/U grading

SSE 451: Supervised Student Teaching -- Middle Level Grades 7-9

Prospective secondary school social studies teachers receive supervised practice teaching by arrangements with selected Long Island secondary schools. The student teacher reports to the school to which he or she is assigned each full school day for the entire semester. Frequent consultation with the supervising teacher helps the student to interpret and evaluate the student teaching experience. Applications must be filed in the semester preceding that in which the student plans to student teach. The dates by which applications must be completed are announced in PEP Guide to Teacher Education.

Prerequisites: C or hgher in SSE 398 (formerly SSI 398); 3.00 g.p.a. in the major; enrollment in the Social Studies Secondary Teacher Preparation Program; approval of social studies director

Corequisites: SSE 452 and 454 (formerly SSI 452 and 454)

6 credits, S/U grading

SSE 452: Supervised Student Teaching-High School Grades 10-12

Prospective secondary school social studies teachers receive supervised practice teaching by arrangements with selected Long Island secondary schools. The student teacher reports to the school to which he or she is assigned each full school day for the entire semester. Frequent consultation with the supervising teacher helps the student to interpret and evaluate the student teaching experience. Applications must be filed in the semester preceding that in which the student plans to student teach. The dates by which applications must be completed are announced in PEP Guide to Teacher Education.

Prerequisites: C or hgher in SSE 398 (formerly SSI 398); 3.00 g.p.a. in the major; enrollment in the Social Studies Secondary Teacher Preparation Program; approval of social studies director

Corequisites: SSE 451 and 454 (formerly SSI 451 and 454)

6 credits, S/U grading

SSE 454: Student Teaching Seminar

Seminar on problems and issues of teaching social studies at the secondary school level. Analysis of actual problems and issues encountered by the student in his or her student teaching experience. The course includes a unit on identifying and reporting child abuse and maltreatment. Students in this course are required to pay a fee that is used solely to secure the New York State Certificate in Identifying and Reporting Child Abuse and Maltreatment.

Prerequisite: C or higher in SSE 398 (formerly SSI 398)

Corequisites: SSE 451 and 452 (formerly SSI 451 and 452)

3 credits

SSE 475: Undergrad Teachng Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

SSE 476: Undergrad Teachng Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. In SSE 476, students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

SSE 487: Independent Project in Social Sciences Education

Independent projects in social studies secondary school education designed for students enrolled in the social studies teacher preparation program. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: 18 credits in the social and behavioral sciences; permission of instructor

0-6 credits