HIS: History

HIS 101: European History: from Antiquity to Revolution

An introduction to the ideas and institutions of "the West" from the beginnings of civilization to the French Revolution. Topics include ancient cultures; the rise of Christianity; medieval politics and society, Renaissance art and thought; the Reformation and Counter-Reformation; the new science; absolutism and the modern state; and the Enlightenment.

DEC:     F
SBC:     GLO, SBS

3 credits

HIS 102: Modern European History from 1789 to 1945

An introduction to the revolutionary events in politics and the economy, principally the industrialization of society, and the national, class, ethnic, and gender conflicts that dominated the period, including their cultural and ideological aspects. The course begins with the French Revolution, characterized by high hopes for the rational mastery of nature and society, and ends with the Second World War, a period of mass destruction and total war.

DEC:     F
SBC:     GLO, SBS

3 credits

HIS 103: American History to 1877

A survey of American history from the Age of Discovery to the end of Reconstruction. Topics include the transplantation of European culture to America, the rise of American nationalism, the democratization of American society, the institution of slavery, and the emergence of an industrial society.

DEC:     F & 4
SBC:     SBS, USA

3 credits

HIS 104: United States Since 1877

A survey of modern American history from the end of Reconstruction to the present. The course focuses on the impact of industrialization on social, cultural, and political life; the emergence of the United States as a world power; and the adaptation of that power to the crises of the later 20th century.

DEC:     F & 4
SBC:     SBS, USA

3 credits

HIS 105: The Ancient World

An overview of the cultures and civilizations of the Old World from the emergence of the first cities around 3500 BCE to the fall of the Roman Empire. The primary focus is on the development of the stream of tradition antecedent to modern Europe that begins in the ancient Near East and moves through Greece and the Hellenistic world to Rome. The emergence of the first civilizations in India and China will also be treated. Students will focus on individual and group behavior within society and use historical methods and content as a means to observe and analyze human activity and society.

DEC:     F
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 201: The Ancient Near East

An overview of the world's first civilization, from the invention of writing to the conquests of Alexander the Great (d. 323 BCE). Ancient Mesopotamia, in which Sumerians Akkadians, Babylonians, and Assyrians developed their distinctive cultures, will be the central focus, but other Near Eastern peoples who were deeply influenced by the Mesopotamian tradition, such as the Hittites, Israelites, Phoenicians, and Persians, will be covered as well.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 105

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 202: Ancient Greece

Basic features of modern life can be traced back to the people of ancient Greece: democracy, philosophy, theater, and more all began among the ancient Hellenes. Who were these people? What enabled them to achieve so much, and why has their influence lasted so long? This course will try to answer these questions.

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 203: Ancient Rome

Important features of modern culture, the legal and religious foundations of our heritage, were shaped by the people of ancient Rome. How could the inhabitants of one city achieve so much, and why has their influence lasted so long? This course will try to answer these questions.

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 204: Egypt of the Pharaohs

An archaeologically informed overview of the history of ancient Egypt, beginning with the introduction of agriculture and concluding with the integration of Egypt into the Roman Empire. Particular attention will be given to the records of the ancient Egyptians themselves, which are transmitted to us through the hieroglyphic writing systems and its derivatives. While political history forms the chronological framework of the presentation, there will be detailed consideration of various aspects of Egyptian culture such as kingship, political institutions, artistic traditions, mortuary practices, religion, historiography, and literature.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 105

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 208: Ireland from St. Patrick to the Present

A survey of the history of Ireland with emphasis on its colonization and the subsequent emergence of an independent, though troubled and fragmentary, national state.

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 209: Imperial Russia

The political, social, and cultural developments from Peter the Great to the revolutionary era with emphasis on the unique institutional structure of Tsarist Russia and the problem of its relations with the West.

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 210: Soviet Russia

The ideological and social background of the Russian Revolution and the evolution of Soviet rule: the problem of industrialization, the relations with the capitalist West, and totalitarian control over society.

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 212: Ancient History of Mesoamerica

A detailed examination of the Pre-Columbian civilizations of Mesoamerica. Traces the historical development of Mesoamerican populations from transhumant hunter-gatherers to some of the world's most intriguing independent civilizations. Emphasis will be placed on the social, economic, and political trajectories of the Olmec, Teotihuac�no, Zapotec, Maya, Toltec, and Aztec peoples. Class will conclude with a discussion of the role of ancient history in the region's modern identity.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 213: Colonial Latin America

From conquest to independence: Spanish and Portuguese colonialism in the New World and the forging of Latin American societies.

Advisory Prerequisite: LAC 200

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 214: Modern Latin America

From independence to the present: the evolution of 19th- and 20th-century Latin America. Emphasis on current social, economic, and political issues. This course is offered as both HIS 214 and POL 214.

Advisory Prerequisite: LAC 200

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 215: Long Island History

An exploration of U.S. history through the lens of Long Island's history from colonial times to the present. Topics include the island's Native Americans, colonial settlement, towns and counties, the Revolution, slavery, whaling, farming, the Long Island Railroad, suburbanization and modern cultural, social, and economic developments.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 102-104 or equivalent

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS, USA

3 credits

HIS 216: History of U.S.-Latin American Relations

An examination of the impact of U.S. economic and political relations with Latin America from the mid-19th century to the present. The course considers changes in American policy toward Latin America, as well as the varying responses of Latin American nations to U.S. intervention and influence. This course is offered as both HIS 216 and POL 216.

Advisory Prerequisite: One HIS course

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 219: Introduction to Chinese History and Civilization

Introductory survey examining key concepts and significant themes in Chinese history. Topics include Confucianism, popular religion, government, foreign policy, the economy, Western influence, Chinese revolution, and modernization.

Advisory Prerequisite: One HIS course

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 220: Introduction to Japanese History and Civilization

A broad survey of Japan's history since antiquity. Focus is on the broader processes of political, economic, social, and cultural transformation of Japan. Themes include: the role of the emperor, Japan's relationship to Asia and the West, state-societal relations, and the nature of Japanese capitalism.

Advisory Prerequisite: One HIS course

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 221: Introduction to Modern African History

Historical themes in 19th- and 20th-century Africa. Topics include social and political relations in African states; slavery and the slave trade in West Africa; the impact of Christianity and Islam on African colonialism; colonialism and its consequences; nationalist movements and de-colonization; pan-Africanism and the politics of African unity; the postcolonial state project; economic planning in postcolonial Africa; and African states and international politics in the Cold War era. This course is offered as both AFS 221 and HIS 221.

Advisory Prerequisite: one D.E.C. category F course or SBS course

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 225: The Formation of the Judaic Heritage

Jewish history and the development of Judaism during the Persian, Hellenistic, and Roman periods (ca. 500 B.C.E.- ca. 500 C.E.). The course begins with the close of the Hebrew Bible, examines the varieties of Judaism which then arose, and ends with the consolidation of rabbinic Judaism on one hand and Christianity on the other. This course is offered as both HIS 225 and JDS 225.

Advisory Prerequisite: RLS 101 or 110 or one HIS course

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 226: The Shaping of Modern Judaism

The history of the Jews and of Judaism since the fall of the Roman Empire and the rise of Islam. The course concludes with a study of the Holocaust and the creation of the State of Israel, and includes a survey of the major forms of American Jewish life. This course is offered as both HIS 226 and JDS 226.

Advisory Prerequisite: RLS 101 or 110 or one HIS course

DEC:     F
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 227: Islamic Civilization

Selected topics in Islamic civilization beginning with the Arabian world at the time of Muhammed and extending to current events. The focus of the course is primarily on history and culture, but the interplay of politics and religion is also examined.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 235: The Early Middle Ages

A survey of Europe in the Early Middle Ages (300-1100) from the emergence of Christianity and the decline of the Roman Empire in the West through the Investiture Struggle and the early Crusades. The course covers social, political, cultural, and religious developments. Emphasis is placed on the reading of primary sources - literary and religious texts and the public record.

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 236: The Late Middle Ages

A survey of Europe in the Later Middle Ages (1100-1500) from the Crusades and rise of towns and feudal monarchy through the years of war, plague, and the Great Schism and Conciliarism. The course covers social, political, cultural, and religious developments. Emphasis is placed on the reading of primary sources - literary and religious texts and the public record.

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 237: Science, Technology, and Medicine in Western Civilization I

An examination of science, technology, medicine, and their social organization from 1450-1790 (from the Renaissance to the French Revolution) and the origin of those systems in Western cultures. Among the topics covered are experimentation and mathematics, funding of technological development by the state, organizations of scientists, the place of science and technology in cultural life, industrialization, and the character and organization of medical practice.

Advisory Prerequisite: one D.E.C. category F course or SBS course

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

HIS 238: Science, Technology, and Medicine in Western Civilization II

An examination of science, technology, medicine, and their social organization from 1790 to the present (from the French Revolution to the end of the Cold War) and the development of these systems world wide. Among the topics covered are professionalization of medicine, implications of physics for defense industries, growth of biotechnology, and the impact of Darwinism on culture.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 102

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

HIS 241: The Holocaust: The Destruction of European Jewry--Causes and Consequences

The rise of modern anti-Semitism since the late 18th century and its political application in Nazi Germany. Topics include the destruction process, ghetto life, resistance, foreign response, and the war crimes trials. This course is offered as both HIS 241 and JDS 241.

Advisory Prerequisite: JDS/HIS 226 or HIS 101 or 102

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 247: Modern Korea through Visual Culture

Examines Korea's historical experiences and social transformation from mid-nineteenth century to present through visual materials such as photographs, films, postcards, print materials and paintings as well as historical texts and secondary analysis. Students will acquire in-depth knowledge of Korea's modern experiences as well as its contemporary society and culture. The course aims to cultivate students' visual literacy on modern Korea through interpreting and analyzing historical visual documents and creating their own visual essays.

DEC:     F
SBC:     GLO, SBS

3 credits

HIS 248: Europe, 1815-1914

European history from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of the First World War, with emphasis on political and social developments, but also including economic and cultural trends.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 101 or 102

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 249: Modern Europe, 1914-1945

European history from the outbreak of the First World War to the post-World War II period, with emphasis on political and social developments, but also including economic and cultural trends. Consideration of the historic forces leading up to the events of 1914.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 102

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 250: The Second World War, 1939-1945

A comprehensive examination of the ordeal of total war. Military history forms the background for a study of how societies mobilized to meet the demands of total war; how people faced foreign occupation and persecution; and how the war changed political, economic, and social institutions, inspired moral reflection and cultural expression, and altered the global balance of power.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 102

DEC:     F
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 251: Europe Since 1945

A study of contemporary Europe against the background of 20th century history, emphasizing political developments beginning with the Cold War, de-colonization, the problems of postindustrial society, managed capitalism, and intellectual and cultural movements such as existentialism and Marxist humanism.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 102

DEC:     I
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

HIS 261: Change and Reform in the United States, 1877-1919

The growth of industrialism, class conflict, and ethnic diversity in America and the rise of social reform movements to address these changing conditions. Includes early 19th-century background and explores implications for the present day.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     USA

3 credits

HIS 262: American Colonial Society

Political, economic, social, and cultural characteristics of the American colonies from their founding until their separation from Great Britain. Particular attention is devoted to the interaction of cultures and peoples in the making of colonial societies as reflected in the institution of slavery and ethnic, racial, and provincial identities.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 103

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     USA

3 credits

HIS 263: Age of the American Revolution

The social, economic, and political history of the period 1763-1787, set against the background of the development of colonial society. The course stresses social and economic changes, the causes and results of the Revolution, the formation of new state and national governments, and the first party system.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 103

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     USA

3 credits

HIS 264: The Early Republic

Against the background of colonial and revolutionary developments, the course examines the beginnings of modern political, economic, and social institutions in the United States. Areas covered include the conflict between the North and South, economic growth and diversity, political democratization and the rise of the professional politician, changes in the roles of men and women, and the development of American popular culture.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 103

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     USA

3 credits

HIS 265: Civil War and Reconstruction

An examination of the political and social roots of the conflict between the slave South and free-labor North, going back to the earliest settlements and Constitutional debates. Major themes include how two very different societies fought the war; the political battles over the nature of the reunited nation; the Black Experience during slavery, wartime, and Reconstruction; and changing white racial attitudes throughout this era.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 103

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     USA

3 credits

HIS 266: History of the United States West

Study of the United States West as both a place and a process, examining the region through its history as the homeland of various Native American peoples; as an object of European imperial designs and then Mexican and U.S. economic, territorial, and cultural expansionism; and finally as a region with particular ties to the United States federal government as well as distinctive patterns of race relations and a unique place in U.S. cultural memory.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 103 or 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     USA

3 credits

HIS 268: Recent U.S. History, 1919 - Present

A survey of recent U.S. history: the 19th and early 20th century social, cultural, and economic developments. Topics include the 1920's, the Great Depression and New Deal, the Cold War, the 1960s and after.

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     USA

3 credits

HIS 277: The Modern Color Line

An exploration of the significance of race in 19th- and early 20th-century America. Topics include forms of political organization and collective struggle; the social and psychic consequences of racist subjection; the relationship among race, racism, and culture; and the cultural politics of race and gender. This course is offered as both AFS 277 and HIS 277.

Advisory Prerequisites: AFS 101 and AFS 102

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     USA

3 credits

HIS 281: Global History and Geography

The ways in which geography has influenced human history, and the ways in which the societal impact on Earth's ecosystems has grown since the Industrial Revolution. Additional topics include old and new ideas about history, geography, and climate; the gradual unveiling of the whole face of the Earth through exploration and cartography; and the recent development of Geographical Information Systems (GIS).

Prerequisite: one D.E.C. F or SBS course

Advisory Prerequisite: one D.E.C. E or SNW course

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

HIS 300: Global History

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to global history. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one course in 20th-century history

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 301: Reading and Writing History

How modern historians have written history, focusing on the methods of three types of history - social, cultural, and political - and how historians have addressed three major problems of historical analysis - causation, motivation, and the significance or meaning of events. Readings include material from U.S., European, and Latin American history.

Prerequisites: At least six credits in history

3 credits

HIS 302: Environmental History in Global Perspective

An exploration of human-caused transformations in natural environments and in ideas about nature from prehistory to the present. Examining topics from agriculture and deforestation in classical antiquity to the Columbian encounter, from problems of environmental management in imperial India to the emergence of environmentalism as a global movement today, the course focuses on case studies from several regions, including the Mediterranean, the Caribbean, New England, and South Asia.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; 1 D.E.C. E or SNW course

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

HIS 303: The Crusades and Medieval Society

This course examines the various medieval military conflicts known collectively as The Crusades. We will investigate specific episodes such as the Latin conquest of Jerusalem, the Children's Crusade, the Shepards' Crusade, and the Albigensian Crusade. We will also explore such issues as the origins of the idea of crusade, the social developments underlying the crusades, crusading culture and propaganda, the European encounter with the Muslim world, and the long term effects of the crusades on European society, politics, culture, and economy.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

Advisory prerequisites: HIS 101 or HIS 236

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 304: Religion, Magic and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe

An exploration of the ways in which, from the late Middle Ages through the Reaissance and Reformation to the Enlightenment, Europeans struggled to define their identity and beliefs. The course will investigate such topics as medieval reactions to magic and heresy, the rise of the witch hunts, the split-up of Christendom into warring Catholic and Protestant empires, and the emergence of modern ideas of skepticism and toleration.

Prerequisite: HIS 101 or 102 and U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 305: Victorian Britain

This course explains the social, cultural and political history of Britain in the nineteenth century. It pays particular attention to the impact of empire, industrialization and major constitutional reform and revolution on domestic politics, social attitudes and intellectual and cultural life in Britain. Topics to be explored include industrialization and class; Reform Acts; the gospel of work; the condition of England question; urban anthropology and the discovery of poverty; the cult of true womanhood, feminism and the public sphere; the impact of the Indian Mutiny of 1857; Africa and the Victorians; the regime of sexuality; Jack the Ripper and the others within. We explore these issues through lectures, reading, films, discussion exams and essays.

Prerequisite: HIS 101 or 102 and U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 306: Post-1945 Britain: Postcolonial Disruptions

This course on post-1945 Britain will examine the 'great events' of the post World War period and the patterns of social, economic, and political change through the lens of British experience. In particular, we will attend to the impact of decolonization on issues of race, class and gender within British domestic culture. The second half of the twentieth century marked the successes and failures of the twinned projects of socialism and decolonization, while also producing new kinds of mass cultural exports that continue to shape global culture. These narratives of changing configurations of empire, class, race, gender and politics are the subject of this course.

Prerequisites: HIS 102 and U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 308: Britain and France in the Age of Revolution

This course examines the social, intellectural, cultural and political life of Britain, France and their overseas colonies from the death of the Sun King to the Battle of Waterloo. We will examine the sources and consequences of related developments, focusing on: the structure of the ancient regime states; the impact of war and empire; women, race and pubilc culture in the Enlightenment; Paris and London as global cities; exoticism and exploration; the emergence of popular radicalisms, and the transatlantic circuits of revolution.

Prerequisites: HIS 102 and U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 310: Modern France, 1900 to the Present

The French nation's response to the traumas of world wars, depression, decolonization, and the challenge of industrial society from the Dreyfus Affair to the Fifth Republic.

Prerequisite: HIS 102

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 312: From Empire to Third Reich: Germany, 1890-1945

From Bismarck's dismissal through the Wilhelmian Empire, the First World War and Revolution to Germany's unsuccessful experiment with democracy - the Weimar Republic - accompanied by the rise of Hitler's Nazi movement, which culminated in the Third Reich and the Second World War.

Prerequisite: HIS 102

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 318: Social and Intellectual History of Europe

An examination of the great movements of ideas in their social and historical contexts in modern European history. Themes may include liberalism, conservatism, romanticism, 19th-century realism, and the discovery of the unconscious.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 101 or 102

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 319: Assyrians, Babylonians, and Hittites

History of the great civilizations of the Late Bronze and Iron Age Near East. Babylonians, Assyrians, and Hittites borrowed much from earlier Mesopotamia and created empires that embraced most of the literate world in the period between 2000 and 500BC. Examination of the causes of the rise and fall of these powers and their influence on posterity, including their impact on those who wrote the Bible.

Prerequisite: HIS 105, HIS 201, or ANT 360

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 324: Lost Languages, Ancient Civilizations, and Decipherments

The early history of writing and its role in the first civilizations, explored through decipherments of texts in which the languages or scripts were initially unknown to modern scholars. Explores first civilizations of the Near East, Egypt, Mediterranean, Indus Valley, China, Mesoamerica and discusses the role of literacy in each. Related questions include the relationship between language and writing, characteristics of the major language families, history of the alphabet, and the application of modern cryptographic techniques to the decipherment of ancient texts.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 105 or LIN 101

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 325: The Civil Rights Movement

A detailed study of the movement for civil rights from its origins, examining the establishment of the NAACP, race relations between whites and blacks since 1900, the role of the Supreme Court and the federal government, and the turn to militancy in the 1950s and after.This course is offered as both AFS 325 and HIS 325.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 104 or AFS 101 or 102

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 326: History of Popular Culture

The development of popular culture in the United States. The course examines the history of different aspects and genres of popular mentality - 18th century artisanal culture; 19th century commercial culture; and the rise of mass media culture in the 20th century.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 103 or 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 330: Topics in Middle Eastern History

Topics may include titles such as Ancient Near Eastern Culture; Ancient Mesopotamia; and The Politics of the Israeli/Arab Conflict. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to non-Western world civilizations. Students will be expected to demonstrate either a knowledge of a broad outline of world history, or the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of one non-Western civilization. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: HIS 225 or 226 or 227

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 333: Women in U.S. History

An interpretation of the history of women in relation to the major themes in American history such as industrialization and urbanization. Emphasis is placed on topics of special interest to women, i.e., the cult of domesticity, the birth control movement, feminism, women and reform, and changing attitudes toward female sexuality. This course is offered as both HIS 333 and WST 333.

Prerequisite one of the following: HIS 103, HIS 104, WST 102, or WST 103

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 335: Women at Work in Twentieth-Century America

Women have always worked but as Americans entered the 20th century the conditions of labor--and workers' relationship to their work--changed for both men and women wage-earners. This course will explore the various changes as they directly affected American women economically, socially, and politically and will open up discussions of the impact of race and class as well as gender. This course is offered as both HIS 335 and WST 335.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

Advisory prerequisite: HIS 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 336: Women, Work, and Family in Modern European History

An analysis of the effect of urbanization and industrialization on women and the family in Europe from 1750 to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the development of the ideology of the "angel in the house" and the growth of female participation in the work force. Among the topics covered are domestic work, prostitution, sexual attitudes and mores, child-rearing practices, women and revolutionary movements, and the growth of feminism. This course is offered as both HIS 336 and WST 334.

Prerequisite: HIS 102 or WST 102 (formerly SSI/WST 102) or WST 103

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 337: History of Korea

Examines Korean history from ancient to modern times. Korea is one of the many ancient, non-European civilizations claiming a cultural influence on the region and one of the main players in the history of East Asia. Reflecting its unique historical experiences, Korean history has raised diverse debatable issues. The primary goal of this course is to provide an overview of Korean history and, at the same time, through introducing multiple debatable issues of historical significance, the course attempts to enhance students' analytical capability in approaching complicated historical issues. This course is offered as both AAS 337 and and HIS 337.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

Advisory Prerequisite: AAS 217

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 338: Asian and Pacific Islanders in American History

Asian and Pacific Islanders in American History is an examination of the historical factors that have molded Asian and Pacific Islander life in the United States. Strongly emphasized themes include imperialism/colonialism, immigration, gender/sexuality, second generation, and images/mass media.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 339: Recent African American History

A study of recent African American history. Topics will include the dramatic increase in the number of black elected officials, rise of the black middle-class, the urban crisis, contemporary civil rights struggles, affirmative action, the decline of black radicalism, and the incorporation of black leadership. Enables students to examine the relationship between African Americans and American society during the past 100 years, particularly since 1970. This course is offered as both AFS 339 and HIS 339.

Prerequisite: one D.E.C. F or SBS course

DEC:     K
SBC:     SBS+, USA

3 credits

HIS 340: Topics in Asian History

Past topics have included titles such as Late Imperial China; The Chinese Diaspora; and Overseas Chinese and Chinatowns. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to non-Western world civilizations. Students will be expected to demonstrate either a knowledge of a broad outline of world history, or the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of one non-Western civilization. May be repeated as the topic changes. This course is offered as both AAS 340 and HIS 340.

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 341: 20th-Century China

The history of China from the collapse of the monarchy to the triumph of communism, emphasizing the revolutionary, political, social, and economic changes in China today. Special attention is given to the theory and practice of Chinese communism.

Prerequisite: One HIS course

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 219

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 344: Modern Japan

The history of Japan from the beginning of its imperialistic expansion in 1895 to World War II and postwar reconstruction, including such contemporary topics as educational issues, economic policies, and foreign relations.

Prerequisite: One HIS course

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 220

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 345: Women and Gender in Chinese History

Exploration of traditional cultural practices and values, and the 20th-century changes in Western and Asian relations in China brought about by nationalism, interaction with Western influences, and socialist rule. This course is offered as HIS 345 and WST 345.

Prerequisite: One of the following: HIS 219, HIS 220, CNS 249, CNS 250, or any WST course

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 346: Political and Social History of Africa

An exploration of theoretical perspectives in the historical sociology and comparative politics of Africa. Topics include the crisis of state legitimacy; the patriarchal society; ethnicity, religion, and politics; the politics of modernization; development and the environment; population growth and underdevelopment; globalization, neo-liberal economic policy and the postcolonial state; and the history of state and society relations. This course is offered as both AFS 346 and HIS 346.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisites: Two AFS or HIS courses

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 347: South Asia Before Colonialism

The South Asia region (contemporary India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Afghanistan) has been a crossroads of diverse people, ideas and commodities for millennia. This course covers key themes and developments in the subcontinent from antiquity to the rise of British colonialism. We will begin by covering major issues in early South Asia, and proceed to consider closely the medieval and early modern periods. Central themes include pre-modern dimensions of the Hindu-Muslim encounter, emergence of South Asian regions, the subcontinent in global networks, and early presence of European powers. This course is offered as both AAS 347 and HIS 347.

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 348: Colonial South Asia

Colonial South Asia comprised much of what is now India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, and was dubbed `the jewel in the crown' of the British Empire at its height. The Subcontinent's status as the most populous and lucrative colony of the world's largest empire profoundly shaped the world of both colonized and colonizer there. The readings, lectures and discussions call upon students to consider the political, social, economic and cultural and religious effects of Britain's rule in the South Asia during the period of British colonial domination (from about 1700 to 1950).

Prerequisite: One of the following: HIS 101, 102, 219, 220 or AAS 201 (or the former SAS 240)

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 350: Topics in African History

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: two AFS or two HIS courses

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 351: Revolutionary China: Politics, Culture, and Power

Explores the history of revolutionary nation-building efforts in 20th century China, examining social, cultural, economic and political developments during the "Republican" and "Maoist" periods. Focuses on key terms and concepts used by agents and analysts of revolutionary change. Draws on interdisciplinary scholarly studies, government documents, media reports, auto-biographical accounts, and popular fiction to assess the consequences of major events on people's lives, livelihoods, worldviews, and personal relationships. This course is offered as both AAS 351 and HIS 351.

Prerequisite: One AAS or HIS course

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 352: Environmental History of China

The history of interaction between human activities and the natural environment in China, with special attention to ecological consequences of various paradigms of economic development throughout Chinese history. Focus in on the political ecology of state-level societies, and the relationships between cultural ideas, behavioral practices, human health, and environmental change. This course is offered as both AAS 352 and HIS 352.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; completion of D.E.C. category E

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

HIS 353: Postwar Japan

This course provides an in-depth look at post World War II Japanese society, culture, and political-economy. We will take up a number of debates on topics such as the postwar "miracle," technocracy vs. democracy, mass consumer culture, Japanese youth, postwar feminism, US-Japan relations, and war memory.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 220 or HIS 344

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 356: Zionism Before 1948

A survey of ideologies that have found expression under the general banner of Zionism. Topics include the origins and development of those ideologies, and the important ideological and conceptual issues that the Zionist movement has not yet managed to resolve.

Prerequisite: One course in modern European history (HIS 226 recommended)

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 357: Topics in History

May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing and one HIS course

3 credits

HIS 360: Women in Premodern Europe

An examination of the position of women in European society from ancient Greece through the Italian Renaissance. The course examines women's roles in the family and political life; women's economic activities; women and the Christian church; cultural attitudes concerning women; and women's own writing and creativity. This course is offered as both HIS 360 and WST 360.

Prerequisite: One HIS course or any WST course

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 361: American History/ American Film

Panorama of American history from Colonial times to the present through the medium of film. Film is viewed as a product of history and a reflection of the social and ideological context in which it is created.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

DEC:     K

3 credits

HIS 362: Making Peace With the Sixties

A study of the 1960's, emphasizing conflict within American liberalism between cold warriors and antiwar activists, advocates of the bureaucratic welfare state versus those favoring small-scale community operations, and technocratic liberalism versus a policy of immediacy and moral witness. Special attention is given to the paradigmatic qualities of the civil rights movement, the domestic side of the Vietnam War, and the relationship of liberalism to radicalism.

Advisory Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     K
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 363: Topics in American History

Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific descriptions when course is offered. Topics may include titles such as American Cars and Highways, Radio and Television, and Disney's America. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within social sciences disciplines such as history, economics, political science, and linguistics. Students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the methods social scientists use to explore social phenomena, and knowledge of the major concepts, models, and issues of the social science discipline(s) studied. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; HIS 103 or 104

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 365: Environmental History of North America

The history of interactions between human beings and their natural environment on this continent, with special attention to the Northeastern region. Trans-formations of forests, homes, farms, and industrial workplaces will be considered. Cultural, economic, political and technological perspectives on the relationship between humans and nature from pre-Columbian to late 20th-century times.

Prerequisites: HIS 103 and 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 368: Wealth and Inequality in the Modern Corporate Age

This course delves into the dynamics by which wealth has been created in an American economy dominated by large corporations, and the changing patterns of inequity that have followed. Ever since big companies came to dominate the economy in the late nineteenth century, American affluence has come in spurts or 'booms.' Each period has had its characteristic new technologies and companies and their entrepreneurs, which part of the course will chart, from the robber barrons to the dot.com-ers. We will then explore impacts on the work most Americans did, on wealth distribution and political economy, and on the changing ways in which many Americans remained poor.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory prerequisite: HIS 103 or 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 369: American Social History to 1860

The development of American society from the 17th century to the beginning of industrialization, with emphasis on changing concepts of class and community relations, work, and family and gender roles. Special attention to how the diversity of the American people shaped the evolution from a traditional world view to the more modern, competitive society of the 19th century.

Prerequisite: HIS 103

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 370: U.S. Social History, 1860-1930

The evolution of American society from the mid-19th century to the Great Depression. An examination of the impact of the Industrial Revolution, urbanization, and mass immigration on concepts of class, community, family, and gender roles. Special emphasis on how increasing class conflict and changing expectations of family life forced the evolution of new, modern social values and institutions.

Prerequisite: HIS 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 371: Law and Society in American History, 1620-1877

This course examines the interaction between law and society in America from the period of European colonization through the mid 19th century. Some of the themes we will examine are: the clash of native and European legal systems; the adoption and adaptation of European law, particularly English law, to the circumstances of the American colonies; the development of the profession of law; changing definitions of crime and penal practices; shifts in women's legal status and their relationship to everyday practices and opportunities for women; the changing legal status of children; and transformations in the law of servitude, slavery, race, and emancipation. Witches, judges, women, lawyers, bankrupts, laborers, Native Americans, servants and slaves are some of the groups we encounter in assessing the forces that shaped American legal culture and its institutions. No prior knowledge of law is necessary.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

Advisory prerequisite: HIS 103

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 372: U.S. Constitutional History and Civil Rights

An examination of United States law and constitutional history from colonial times to the present. A particular focus is placed on the history of civil rights and the struggles of women and minorities to be fully included in the interpretation of constitutional protections.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 373: History of Crime and Criminal Justice in the U.S.

Study of the development of police, courts, prisons, criminal law and crime in the United States from the 17th century to the present. How were the institutions of criminal justice created? How did they change? How have people perceived and responded to crime?

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 status; HIS 104

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 375: American Politics and Diplomacy to 1898

The rise of the United States from its origins as a string of dependent settlements along the Atlantic coast to a continent-spanning global power. An examination of the emergence of a distinctively American political system and its interaction with American's foreign relations.

Prerequisite: HIS 103 or HIS 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 376: American Politics and Diplomacy, 1898-1945

An examination of the invention of modern, advertising-based politics in the 1890's to the forging of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal coalition under the twin shocks of the First and Second World Wars.

Prerequisite: HIS 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 377: American Politics and Diplomacy Since 1945

The impact of the Cold War upon American politics and diplomacy, with special attention to the challenges of the 1960's to American political and global orders. The collapse of both orders from Reaganism and the end of the Cold War.

Prerequisite: HIS 104

Advisory Prerequisites: Completion of D.E.C. categories I and J

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 378: War and the Military

The causes and origins of wars, and the impact of war on social change, considered in the context of various wars and battles. Topics covered include issues of military organization, recruitment, training, morale, war planning, and the integration of women, gays, and minorities in the military. This course is offered as both HIS 378 and SOC 378.

Prerequisite: One HIS course or SOC 105

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 379: Disease in American History

An examination of changing disease patterns and their impact on American society from the colonial period to the present. Particular attention is paid first to the great epidemics of the 19th century, and how public health measures brought them under control, and the emergence of chronic ailments such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes as the leading causes of death in the 20th century.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

Advisory prerequisite: HIS 103 or HIS 104

DEC:     K
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 380: Topics in Latin-American History

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: HIS 213 or HIS/POL 214 or HIS/POL 216

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 381: Latin America and World Commodities (1500-2000)

A study of world commodities to learn about and reflect on the connections and contributions of Latin America to the world economy and world culture. Students learn about such products as cocoa, sugar, silver, coffee, rubber, bananas, and cocaine, and the special ways their new histories shed light on the history of Latin Americans, world consumption, and globalization from 1500 to the present.

Prerequisite: a 200-level course in world or international history

Advisory Prerequisite: One World (non-US) History course

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 382: Politics and Political Change in Latin America

An examination of revolutionary and reformist movements that have shaped the political, social, and economic contours of 20th-century Latin America. Topics include the Mexican and Cuban revolutions, populism, urban squatter movements, and guerrilla warfare. This course is offered as both HIS 382 and POL 382.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 213 or HIS/POL 214 or HIS/POL 216 or LAC 200

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 383: The World of Jane Austen; Jane Austen in the World

An examination of the social, political and cultural milieux and legacies of Jane Austen�s famous novels, including the contours of English provincial and gentry society in the Revolutionary, Napoleonic and Regency periods (1792-1820). Topics will include class and sociability; the functions of the country house; gender and family relations; the pleasures and dangers of urban culture; fashion and leisure pursuits, including tourism; women, theatre and print culture; the impact of empire, war and radical politics on social and political relations of the day, and the details of Jane Austen�s own life, along the ways in which Austen novels were appropriated and used by subsequent generations and in different cultural contexts, from the Victorian critics to twentieth-century Bollywood film adaptations to twenty-first century blogs.

Prerequisite: HIS 102; U3 or U4 status

3 credits

HIS 385: Aztec Civilization

An introduction to the historical development of the Aztec Civilization in the ancient Mesoamerican World. Combining historical, anthropological, art historical, and literary sources, we will trace the rise and decline of the Aztec empire, as well as its social and cultural achievements and imperial problems on the eve of the European arrival. We will explore the conquest of Mexico from the Aztec point of view, and we will conclude with an examination of the ways in which Aztec culture have survived to this day.

Advisory prerequisite: HIS 212

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 386: The Maya

For many, the word 'Maya' evokes images of a long dead culture and ruined pyramids. This course uses that familiarity as a starting point and follows the history of the Maya from ancient times to the present. We begin with an overview of what scholars know about the ancient Maya before tracing their experiences since the Spanish conquest, placing emphasis on Spanish colonization in the lowland areas of Mesoamerica, Mexico's War of the Castas, and the diverse experiences of the modern Maya including the Guatemalan Civil War and the Chiapas uprising, the impact of foreign tourism, and the experience of transnational migration. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which environmental and agrarian issues have impacted this diverse group of peoples.

Advisory prerequisite: HIS 212

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 388: Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean

The institution of slavery and its impact on plantation societies in the Americas, with particular attention to Brazil and the Caribbean. Topics include conquest and enslavement, the formation of slave communities, African culture in Latin America, resistance and oppression, the process of emancipation, and race relations. This course is offered as both AFS 388 and HIS 388.

Prerequisite: One of the following: AFS 239, AFS 240, AFS 277, HIS 213, HIS 214, or LAC 200

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 389: Modern Mexico

The history of Mexico from independence in 1810 to the present crisis. The course explores the relationships among agrarian development, social movements, and state building in Mexican history. Topics include 19th-century instability and liberal reform, and the 20th-century revolution and its legacy for modern Mexican politics.

Prerequisite: HIS 213 or HIS/POL 214 or HIS/POL 216

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 390: Topics in Ancient and Medieval Europe

Recent topics have included Early and Medieval Christianity; Leaders in Ancient Greece and Rome. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one European history course

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 391: Topics in Early Modern Europe

Recent topics have included Europe in the 16th Century; Before and After the Reformation; Early Modern England. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one European history course

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 392: Topics in European History

Recent topics have included England and France in the 18th Century; 17th Century Europe. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: One course in modern European history

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 393: Topics in Modern European History

Recent topics have included London, Paris and Berlin from 1900 to 2000; Victorian England and its legacy; European capitalism from 1900 to the present. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: HIS 102

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 394: Topics in History of Medicine and Reproduction

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one HIS course

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

HIS 395: Topics in Russian History

Topics may include Marxism and its aftermath; modern Russian social history, 1750-1921; Russian intellectual history from the 18th to the 20th Century. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: One course in modern European history

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 396: Topics in U.S. History

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to American history. With a focus on U.S. history, topics may include the rise of the American corporation in the 19th and 20th centuries; economic history and changing population patterns; and popular music and society. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; HIS 103 or 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 397: Topics in History of U.S. Immigration and Ethnicity

Topics may include Asian and Pacific Islanders throughout American history; and Latino immigration from 1848 to the present. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; HIS 103 or 104 or AFS 102

DEC:     K & 4

3 credits

HIS 398: Topics in History of Science and Technology

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: HIS 237 or 238

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

HIS 399: Topics in U.S. History

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to American history. With a focus on U.S. history, past topics have included titles such Race, Religion, and Gender; Disease in Modern America; and Early American Commerce and Culture. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific descriptions when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: HIS 103 or 104

DEC:     K & 4
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

HIS 401: Colloquium in European History

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 402: Colloquium in European History

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 403: Colloquium in European History

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 411: Colloquium in American History

Colloquia considering such topics as the history of New York, the westward movement, American socialism, the Vietnam War, U.S. military history, American utopianism, the urban novel, and women in the professions. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 412: Colloquium in American History

Colloquia considering such topics as the history of New York, the westward movement, American socialism, the Vietnam War, U.S. military history, American utopianism, the urban novel, and women in the professions. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 413: Colloquium in American History

Colloquia considering such topics as the history of New York, the westward movement, American socialism, the Vietnam War, U.S. military history, American utopianism, the urban novel, and women in the professions. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 414: Colloquium in American History

Colloquia considering such topics as the history of New York, the westward movement, American socialism, the Vietnam War, U.S. military history, American utopianism, the urban novel, and women in the professions. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 421: Colloquium in Latin American History

Colloquia considering such topics as slavery and race relations, culture and ideology, peasant movements and popular rebellion, and 20th-century revolutions. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 422: Colloquium in Latin American History

Colloquia considering such topics as slavery and race relations, culture and ideology, peasant movements and popular rebellion, and 20th-century revolutions. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 431: Colloquium in Asian History

Colloquia considering such topics as Japanese nationalism and expansion, Far Eastern diplomatic history, and nationalism in Southeast Asia. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 432: Colloquium in Asian History

Colloquia considering such topics as Japanese nationalism and expansion, Far Eastern diplomatic history, and nationalism in Southeast Asia. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 441: Colloquium in Global History

Colloquia considering such topics as the expansion of Europe, theories of imperialism, revolutionary and religious movements, the psychoanalytical interpretation of history, and slavery. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 447: Independent Readings in History

Intensive readings in history for qualified juniors and seniors under the close supervision of a faculty instructor on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty member. Semester Supplements to this Bulletin contain description when course is offered. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: A strong background in history; permission of instructor and department

1-3 credits

HIS 451: Colloquium in Medieval History

Selected topics in medieval history are studied with attention to primary sources and current hagiographic controversies and developments. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 461: Colloquium in the History of Science

Colloquium considering such topics as the history of American science, the social history of science, the impact of Darwinism, modern physics, and technology and social change. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

HIS 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum

Work with a faculty member as assistant in a regularly scheduled course. The student must attend all classes and carry out all assignments; in addition the student will be assigned a specific role to assist in teaching the course. The student will meet with the instructor on a regular basis to discuss intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and undergraduate program director

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

HIS 487: Supervised Research

Qualified advanced undergraduates may carry out individual research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and either department or departmental research coordinator

0-6 credits

HIS 488: Internship

Participation in local, state, and national public and private agencies and organizations. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: 15 credits in history; permission of instructor and department

SBC:     EXP+

0-6 credits, S/U grading

HIS 495: Senior Honors Project in History

First course of a two-semester project for history majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. Arranged in consultation with the department, the project involves independent study and writing a paper under the close supervision of an appropriate instructor on a suitable topic selected by the student. Students enrolled in HIS 495 are obliged to complete HIS 496. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence.

Prerequisite: Admission to the history honors program

3 credits

HIS 496: Senior Honors Project in History

Second course of a two-semester project for history majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. Arranged in consultation with the department, the project involves independent study and writing a paper under the close supervision of an appropriate instructor on a suitable topic selected by the student. Students enrolled in HIS 495 are obliged to complete HIS 496. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence.

Prerequisite: Admission to the history honors program

3 credits