AAS: Asian & Asian American Studies

AAS 102: Eastern Religions

An historical introduction to Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. Attention is given to the cultural background, art, literature, philosophy, and institutional development of each tradition. This course is offered as both AAS 102 and RLS 102.

DEC:     B
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

AAS 110: Appreciating Indian Music

An introduction to the basic elements of Indian classical music, such as "raga" and "tala", "gharanas" (schools) and styles. Vocal and instrumental masterpieces are studied. Topics include: the roles of stringed and percussion instruments; the intimate relationship between music and religion, and music and ethnicity; and the influence of Indian classical music on contemporary art forms such as films and folk music. No previous musical training is required.

DEC:     G
SBC:     ARTS

3 credits

AAS 118: Introduction to Asian Studies

Provides students with information on subjects of common concern to people in both Asia and America, including education, health, religion and values, consumer issues, family and home, mobility (including immigration), children, careers and work, entertainment and leisure, etc. In this context, Asia as a cultured space includes India, Southeast Asia, China, Korea and Japan. Students will design their own maps and timelines to represent tongues, texts, and scripts, as well as ethnic identities. This course has been offered previously as a topic in AAS 211, AAS Topics in the Social Sciences and is not for credit in addition to the topic of the same name offered as AAS 211.

DEC:     F
SBC:     GLO, SBS

3 credits

AAS 201: Introduction to the Civilization of the Indian Subcontinent

Key concepts in South Asian civilization in art, architecture, religion, philosophy, science, society, literature, and politics from the Indus Valley to the present. Topics include evolution of Hinduism, Buddhism, yoga, classical and modern languages, the caste system and reform movements, Asohka, Akbar and great emperors, impact of Islam and Western colonization, and Gandhi and the impact of South Asia on the world.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

AAS 209: Indian Classical Dance: Bharatanatyam

Introduction to the basics of Bharatanatyam (South Indian classical dance) technique. Includes primary postures and basic steps, or adavus. Class also covers the theory of Bharatanatyam including hand gestures, head, neck and eye movements, as delineated in Nandikeswara's Abhinaya Darpana. Students will gain a well-rounded knowledge of the dance by studying Bharatanatyam's form, content, basic history, music, and repertoire. By the end of the class, students will learn and present short dance pieces including a Jathi (string for adavus) and a Shlokam (poem).

Advisory Prerequisite: Any dance class

DEC:     D
SBC:     ARTS

3 credits

AAS 211: Asian and Asian American Studies Topics in the Social Sciences

Using the methodologies of the social sciences disciplines of history, political science, sociology, and economics, this course provides an introductory overview of important topics in Asian and Asian American studies. May be repeated as the topic changes.

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS

3 credits

AAS 212: Asian and Asian American Studies Topics in the Humanities

Using methodologies of the Humanities disciplines, such as literature, linguistics, classics, cultural studies, philosophy, religious studies, art history and criticism, this course provides an introductory overview of important topics in Asian and Asian American Studies. Topics may range from Women in Japanese fiction to Mahatma Gandhi's impact on politics and ethics. May be repeated as the topic changes.

DEC:     G
SBC:     HUM

3 credits

AAS 215: Classical Performing Arts of India

An introduction to the stories, histories, and aesthetics of Indian classical performing arts. The course focuses on Bharatanatyam, the solo dance form from South India. Kathakali, Manipuri, Odissi, and Kathak will be introduced to compare and contrast dance-theatre forms of South Asia. Students will be introduced to each performance form by studying its ancient and modern history, practitioners, technique, stage presentation, and aesthetics. The course explores the commonalities of all these performing art forms including: mythology, the classic text: Natya Shastra, abhinaya (mime) and the theory of rasa. Lessons will be accompanied by suitable reading material and visual demonstrations either on video or by a practitioner of the art form.

Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. A

DEC:     D
SBC:     ARTS

3 credits

AAS 216: Introduction to Japanese Studies

An introduction to Japanese culture as a foundation for understanding Japan. The changing historical experiences of the Japanese people are examined, exposing students to the diversity of backgrounds, values, and opinions in Japan. Japanese history and culture are also explored in relation to other countries and peoples, especially Korea and China.

Advisory Prerequisite: one D.E.C. B or HUM course

DEC:     J
SBC:     ESI, GLO

3 credits

AAS 217: Introduction to Korean Culture

A general survey of Korean culture from the earliest recorded periods to the 20th century, including painting, music, dance, ceramic art, sculpture, architecture, literature, and folklore. These are discussed in relation to the intellectual, philosophical, and religious movements of their time. Previously offered as KRH 240. Not for credit in addition to KRH 240.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

AAS 220: China: Language and Culture

A survey of regional languages and cultures of China. Addresses issues of diversity and standardization in the world's most populous country, particularly the role of language as both a system of spoken and written signs as well as a resource for cultural reproduction and social change. Explores discourse norms, key cultural concepts, and the unique problems posed by cross-cultural translation and interpretation.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, SBS

3 credits

AAS 221: China: Science and Civilization

An introduction to ancient Chinese science and technology, including engineering, medicine, mathematics, architecture and military technology. The global, social and historical impact of these inventions on Western civilization and the subsequent decline of the Chinese scientific paradigm will be examined.

Prerequisites: One DEC E course and U2 status or higher

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

AAS 222: Indian Cinemas and Cultures

The course examines the contemporary global art form known as 'Indian cinemas' from its advent of the moving picture in the late 1800's to the present. In this Asian film course, we explore the various cinemas of India and the Indian diaspora such as Bollywood cinema, art cinema, films by Indian directors inside and outside India, music videos, and documentaries. Factors behind its ascent to the most popular art form as well as a lucrative medium of entertainment and potent vehicle for social change not only in India but also beyond its shores are examined in some depth. We discover how these various Indian cinemas address and depict the social mores, cultural practices and political issues of the South Asian subcontinent. Themes for our discussions include but are not limited to nationalism, sexuality, censorship, activism, tradition, modernity, identity, gender roles, and the pleasures and politics of song, dance and music, as we look at historical, thematic and aesthetic issues of these cinemas and their impact and influence in India as well as globally.

DEC:     D
SBC:     ARTS, GLO

3 credits

AAS 232: Introduction to Asian American Fiction and Film

The course is an introductory survey of Asian American fiction (short stories and novels) and films (narratives and documentaries). A central premise of the course is that the histories of racial segregation in the U.S., immigrant exclusion acts, colonial and contemporary wars in Asia, and global migrations are the political and historical contexts of Asian American narratives.

DEC:     G
SBC:     HUM, USA

3 credits

AAS 236: Korean Religions

Throughout its long history, Korea has experienced and created various religious traditions and became one of the most religiously diverse societies. Korean culture includes a wide variety of religious elements that have shaped the Koreans' way of thinking and living, in the way rarely seen in the European traditions. The objectives of this course are to understand and appreciate the religious heritage of Korea. Instead of trying to abstractly define religions, this course will serve to identify religious practices in which Koreans are engaged. In the process, students will obtain an understanding of important religious concepts, theories, activities, and lives of the religious leaders from ancient times to the present.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

AAS 240: Confucianism and Daoism

An introduction to the basic philosophies and doctrines of Confucianism and Daoism, such as the concept of Dao, non-action, benevolence, and propriety. The course explores both the similarities and the differences between these two traditions. This course is offered as both AAS 240 and RLS 240.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

AAS 250: Languages and Cultures of Asian Americans

Study of language use and cultural accommodation in selected Asian American communities in relation to the changing roles of Asians in U.S. society from the early democracy to the present. Issues include linguistic and cultural diversity of Asia and Asian Americans; comparison of Asian and European immigration patterns; struggle for equality and acceptance; cultural factors in assimilation; patterns of Asian language use and maintenance in various domains; the role of language in ethnic identity; attitudes toward English and bilingualism; bilingualism as a problem and as a resource. This course is offered as both AAS 250 and LIN 250.

DEC:     K
SBC:     SBS, USA

3 credits

AAS 256: Hinduism

Survey of the principal religious and philosophical currents of Hindu civilization in India from the time of the Vedas and Upanishads through the development of the major devotional ways and schools of thought current in India today. These include the polytheism of Hindu mythology, the theism of various forms of devotional practice, and the monotheism and nondualism of Hindu philosophy. This course is offered as both AAS 256 and RLS 256.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

AAS 260: Buddhism

An introduction to the basic philosophy and doctrines of Buddhism, beginning with a survey of lives and works of major historical figures of Buddhism. The principal issues of Buddhist thought, drawing from Indian, East Asian, and Western sources, are treated. Particular attention is paid to the meaning of faith, practice, and enlightenment in Buddhism. This course is offered as both AAS 260 and RLS 260.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

AAS 271: Religion in Ancient Mesopotamia

Presents a picture of religion in ancient Mesopotamia based on archaeological data and ancient texts. A major contribution of the Mesopotamian civilization was the development of a special spiritual life of the people. Since the sixth millennium BC, these beliefs were the way they explained un-known and un-seen experiences. Set rules, traditions and special architecture were developed around these beliefs. These will be discussed, including the incorporation of these beliefs by other cultures. Not for credit in addition to AAS 212, Religion of Ancient Mesopotamia.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

AAS 280: Islam

An introduction to the main features of Islamic revelation as contained in the Koran and its impact on the major spiritual, intellectual, legal, and social teachings and institutions of the Islamic world. The course concludes with an examination of Islam in the modern world. This course is offered as both AAS 280 and RLS 280.

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

AAS 300: Intellectual History of East Asia

Study of the historical development of major intellectual traditions of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea). Topics include the Political Thoughts of the Ancient World (Formations of Confucianism, Taoism, and Yin Yang and Correlative Thinking), Era of Metaphysics (Introduction and Development of Buddhism and East Asian Mysticism), Ethics and Nationalism (Neo-Confucianism and Encounter of the Western Civilization), and East Asia's Modern Transformation (Modernization, Socialism, and Westernization).

Prerequisite: One 200-level course in Asian Studies

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 305: The Pacific, Travel & Empire

This cultural studies course examines the cultures of travel (i.e. fiction, memoirs, photography, and filmmaking) in narratives by and about the Pacific, South and Southeast Asia. We will study "empire" by analyzing narratives about the former colonies of Spain, France, Britain and the United States. As we discuss the metaphors or tropes of empire, we will also examine the concept of empire as a historical and contemporary formation, or what an empire meant in the 19th century and what it means today in the early 21st century. The course begins with the premise that travel narratives and modern visual culture illuminate the relationship between the violence and romance of travel. The course includes modern travel narratives (i.e. novels by Asian Americans) that focus on the lives of those who are forced to travel or migrate due to civil war, poverty and/or economic instability. This course is offered as AAS 305 and EGL 305.

Prerequisite: Any 200 and/or 300 level course offered by the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies or the English Department

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 307: Women in U.S.-Asian Relations

Critically examines the important and, at times, even crucial roles played by women in US-Asian relations over a roughly 125-year period, from the 1850s to the 1970s; and it compares/contrasts these roles to those in the present day. We will study the transformative occupations (writers/poets, missionaries, journalists, diplomats, medical and social workers, scientists, scholars and chefs) to understand how women used motivational discourse and social networking to interpret China, India, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and Vietnam for diverse audiences in America and their native lands in Asia.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+, SPK

3 credits

AAS 310: America's Wars in Asia

Explores America's involvement in and execution of wars in Asia in the 19th and 20th centuries notably in the Philippines, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, with an incisive analysis of American empire building. If war is "an act of violence intended to compel our opponent to fulfill our will," how far did these wars succeed in their aim? Focusing both on American and Asian perspectives on global conflicts, we will draw upon international relations and historical interdisciplinary sources in our investigations, including newer tools such as online digitized oral history collections through the Library of Congress Veterans' History Project.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+, WRTD

3 credits

AAS 319: Arts of China

A survey of Chinese art from the Neolithic period to modern-day China. Visual media such as bronze, jade, sculpture, ink painting and pottery as well as their cultural influence on philosophy, literature, religion and politics will be explored. The course will also examine the influence of India and Central Asian on Chinese art and, in turn, China's influence on Korean and Japanese art.

Prerequisite: ARH 102 or ARH 204

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 320: Literature of India

Introduction to selected classics of Indian literature in English translation. Classical and modern works are discussed, representing Sanskrit (the Vedas, the Upanishads, the epics Ramayana and Mahabharata, classical drama of Kalidasa and Bhasa), Tamil, Kannada, Hindi-Urdu, and Indian English. Western and Indian literary theories and critical approaches are compared and evaluated.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: AAS 201 (or the former SAS 240)

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 321: Korean Literature

An introduction in English to the literary tradition of Korea. Representative literary texts chosen from various periods are studied with attention to their historical background and the aesthetic and cultural values that inform them. Previously offered as KRH 251. Not for credit in addition to KRH 251.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: AAS 217 (formerly KRH 240)

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 322: Literature of Japan

An introduction in English to the literary tradition of Japan. Representative texts chosen from various periods are studied with attention to their historical background and the aesthetic and cultural values that formed them.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: AAS 216 (formerly JNH 240)

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 326: Indian Mythology

Study of the major themes in Indian mythology and their evolution, including the relation of these myths to philisophy and religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Myths are traced from the Vedas of 1500 B.C. to the modern Indian myths. The course will consider the impact of myths on classical Indian literature and art forms, as well as their impact on contemporary art forms such as film, television, and theatre.

Prerequisite: AAS 201 or 212

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 327: Great Epics of India: Ramayana and Mahabharata

The themes, characters, and plots of Ramayana and Mahabharata are analyzed in detail. The moral dilemmas presented and their sometimes controversial solutions are explored in the context of "dharma", or righteousness--the central concept of Hiduism. The course will compare the two epics with each other.

Prerequisite: AAS 201 or 212

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 328: Race, Humor and Asian America

This comparative ethnic American cultures course examines how contemporary American comedians, fiction writers, visual artists, independent filmmakers, feminist and transgendered comics deploy the language of comedy to invoke serious social matters in contemporary American life such as racism, immigration, homophobia, class biases against the poor and the undocumented, misogyny, war and other burning issues of the day. We will explore how the ends of comedy are more than laughter and how comedy confronts political issues that are constitutive of and threatening to the U.S. body politic.

Prerequisite: one 100-level or higher AAS or AMR course

DEC:     K
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 330: Language and Society in South Asia

Study of the evolution, stucture, and role of representative languages in South Asia. Focus is on multilingualism, lingua francas, national language, contact, convergence, and use, especially in education, administration, business, religion, literature, and the media. Topics may also include language, ethnic identity, and conflict; English in India; globalization and localization; and India's impact on linguistics.

Advisory Prerequisite: LIN 101

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 331: Japanese Literature in the Feminine Domain

This course examines both writings of Japanese women and writings about Japanese women. It will challenge the application of current Western feminist standards to Japanese culture through the analysis of Japanese literary works. We will begin with Japanese mythology focusing on the stories of the creator goddess and Amaterasu, the sun goddess, from whom the imperial line was descended. We will consider the great Heian Era women writers and their culture, examining the difference between men's and women's writing. From the Heian era we will move to the Meiji Era, when Japan's isolationist period had ended and centuries' worth of Western literature was introduced to Japan. We will concentrate on the writings of Higuchi Ichiyo, noting how the position of women had changed by her day and how it affected her literary style. The course will close with a focus how literature treats Japanese women in our own time. This course is offered as AAS 331 and WST 331.

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 332: Japanese Literature in the Meiji Era

This course examines Japanese literature of the Meiji era, an era unique in the history of the world. Until the 1400s, Japan had no contact with the West due to its geographic location. After a brief and limited exposure to Western literature, Japan closed its doors to the West and remained isolated from approximately 1600 until 1868. During the Meiji Era (1868-1912) Japan was flooded with examples of all the phases of Western literature it had missed, and Japanese writers soon responded to the Western developments. This course will deal with that response, from Tsubouchi Shyoyo's criticism of modern Japanese novels and their lack of appreciation for Realism, to the development of the Japanese I-novel. Due to Japan's literary response to the West, it can also be argued that the Meiji Era marked the end of Japanese literature as a unique entity, and this course will explore this issue as well.

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 334: English in Asia

Study of the expanding roles of English in South Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. With more non-native speakers than native speakers, and more in Asia than elsewhere, English has acquired new identities. We will study functions of English in colonial and post-colonial times; how it competes with, and complements local languages in business, advertising, media, education, research, administration, judiciary, creative literature, call centers, and on the Internet; the evolution of dynamic new Asian Englishes, such as Indian English, and their social and cultural contexts; controversies regarding English medium education and its impact on local languages, relevance of native English standards, and implications for theory, description, and method in diverse disciplines, such as, business communication, cultural studies, English, lexicography, speech recognition, journalism, media studies, sociolinguistics, teaching English as a second language, and Asian Studies.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

Advisory prerequisite: LIN 101

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 337: History of Korea

Examines Korean history from ancient to modern times. Korea is one of the many ancient, non-European civilizations claiming a cultural influence on the region and one of the main players in the history of East Asia. Reflecting its unique historical experiences, Korean history has raised diverse debatable issues. The primary goal of this course is to provide an overview of Korean history and, at the same time, through introducing multiple debatable issues of historical significance, the course attempts to enhance students' analytical capability in approaching complicated historical issues. This course is offered as both AAS 337 and and HIS 337.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status

Advisory Prerequisite: AAS 217

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 338: Contemporary India: History, Politics, and Diplomacy

Study of the forces shaping India's post-independence history, domestic politics, and foreign diplomacy. As the world's largest democracy, second most populous nation, and Asia's second fastest growing economy, its impact on the international scene in the coming years will be carefully analyzed. The course, taught by a former Ambassador, will also focus on emerging trends in Indo-U.S. relations and impact of the Indian diaspora. This course is offered as both AAS 338 and POL 338.

Prerequisites: One previous course in AAS or POL; U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, SBS+

3 credits

AAS 339: Contemporary China: History, Politics, and Diplomacy

This course will analyze the evolution of major events in contemporary China following the communist revolution that led to the establishment of the People's Republic in 1949. The course, taught by a former Ambassador, will examine major political, economic, and social developments in light of both their general global impact and their particular relationship with the U.S. This course is offered as both AAS 339 and POL 339.

Prerequisites: One previous course in AAS or POL; U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, SBS+

3 credits

AAS 340: Topics in Asian History

Past topics have included titles such as Late Imperial China; The Chinese Diaspora; and Overseas Chinese and Chinatowns. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to non-Western world civilizations. Students will be expected to demonstrate either a knowledge of a broad outline of world history, or the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of one non-Western civilization. May be repeated as the topic changes. This course is offered as both AAS 340 and HIS 340.

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 347: South Asia Before Colonialism

The South Asia region (contemporary India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Afghanistan) has been a crossroads of diverse people, ideas and commodities for millennia. This course covers key themes and developments in the subcontinent from antiquity to the rise of British colonialism. We will begin by covering major issues in early South Asia, and proceed to consider closely the medieval and early modern periods. Central themes include pre-modern dimensions of the Hindu-Muslim encounter, emergence of South Asian regions, the subcontinent in global networks, and early presence of European powers. This course is offered as both AAS 347 and HIS 347.

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 351: Revolutionary China: Politics, Culture, and Power

Explores the history of revolutionary nation-building efforts in 20th century China, examining social, cultural, economic and political developments during the "Republican" and "Maoist" periods. Focuses on key terms and concepts used by agents and analysts of revolutionary change. Draws on interdisciplinary scholarly studies, government documents, media reports, auto-biographical accounts, and popular fiction to assess the consequences of major events on people's lives, livelihoods, worldviews, and personal relationships. This course is offered as both AAS 351 and HIS 351.

Prerequisite: One AAS or HIS course

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 352: Environmental History of China

The history of interaction between human activities and the natural environment in China, with special attention to ecological consequences of various paradigms of economic development throughout Chinese history. Focus in on the political ecology of state-level societies, and the relationships between cultural ideas, behavioral practices, human health, and environmental change. This course is offered as both AAS 352 and HIS 352.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; one D.E.C. E or SNW course

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

AAS 357: India's Foreign Policy

A critical anaylsis of the foreign policy of India since Independence in 1947, especially Non-alignment and relations with major powers. The factors behind India's entry into the nuclear club and its impact on her international relations within the subcontinent and beyond. Analysis of issues such as Kashmir, terrorism, India's quest for a permanent seat in the U.N. Security Council, economic reforms, and role of Indian diaspora to the country's relations with the countries of their adoption.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing or permission of instructor

Advisory Prerequisites: AAS 201 and 348

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 366: Feminine Spirituality

The role and destiny of human beings as envisaged by the world's great traditions, especially the Chinese and the Islamic. The course focuses on the concept of femininity as a principle in the realms of theology, metaphysics, cosmology, and spiritual psychology; and the theoretical and practical applications of the feminine principle to the place of both men and women in society. Topics include feminine and masculine as metaphysical and cosmological principles; woman and religious law; woman's role in symbolism, mythology, and literature; and the feminine aspects of the self that both women and men need to develop on the path of achieving spiritual perfection. Previously offered as RLS 426, this course is now offered as RLS 366. Not for credit in addition to the former RLS 426. This course is offered as both AAS 366 and RLS 366.

Prerequisite: any 200-level or higher RLS course

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 367: Meditation and Enlightenment

A critical analysis of the traditions, practices, and literature of Zen and other traditions of Buddhism, with particular attention paid to the meaning of enlightenment and the practice of meditation. Previously offered as RLS 341, this course is now offered as both AAS 367 and RLS 367. Not for credit in addition to the former RLS 341.

Prerequisite: AAS/RLS 102 or 260

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 368: Yoga: Theory and Praxis

In this course we investigate Yogic systems of philosophy and self-transformation in their many forms throughout history. Topics include the origins of Yoga in ancient India, the philosophy of the Yoga Sutras and its commentarial traditions, Buddhist Yoga, Hatha Yoga, Tantric Yoga, and the medicalization and globalization of Yoga in the modern period. Students are encouraged to supplement class discussions by participating in Yoga classes at the Stony Brook University Wellness Center. This course is offered as both AAS 368 and RLS 368.

Prerequisite: One previous course in AAS or RLS

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 370: Intercultural Communication

Through combination of theory and research from discourse linguistics and linguistic anthropology, this course examines (i) how culture shapes ways of speaking; (ii) how language constructs identities, dispositions, role relations; and (iii) what challenges people from different cultures may face when they communicate with each other. The following analytical perspectives will be presented: speech act theory, ethnography of communication, linguistic politeness, and sequential organization of turn taking. This course is offered as both AAS 370 and LIN 370.

Prerequisite: one previous course in D.E.C. J or SBS+ or one previous course in Linguistics

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 371: Ancient China

Explores the development of social, economic, political, and cultural systems in ancient China, from the neolithic period through the Han dynasty. Draws on archaeological data and historical texts to examine the emergence of state-level polities and their subsequent unification under imperial authority. Analytical focus is on political economy, social organization, ritual exchange, and notions of power and rulership expressed in philosophical thought. This course is offered as both AAS 371 and ANT 371.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one D.E.C. F or SBS course

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 372: Family, Marriage, and Kinship in China

Examines forms and dynamics of social organizations in Chinese society, focusing on cultural, social, and economic aspects of family, marriage, and extended kinship relations such as lineages, clans, and sworn brotherhoods. Particular attention is paid to how gender, generation, class, and ritual exchange shape identity, status, and power. This course is offered as both AAS 372 and ANT 372.

Prerequisite: ANT 102

Advisory Prerequisites: AAS 220 and ANT 354

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 379: Ethnicity and Ecology in China

This course explores issues of ethnic and national identity in the context of the social ecology of the Chinese state, both past and present. It focuses on the material and social relationships that have shaped perceptions of, and interactions between, cultural groups in China and along its frontiers. Drawing on case studies from the Himalayan plateau, Yunnan highlands, Inner Asian steppes, Taiwan, and elsewhere, students examine how sustenance strategies, economic organization, and political administration have influenced construct of ethnic identity. This course is offered as both AAS 379 and ANT 379.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: AAS 220 or HIS 219 (or the former CNS 249 or 250)

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 380: Islamic Classics

A study in depth of Islamic texts in translation. Selections may be made from the Qur'an, the Hadith, the Law, and from one or more of the major intellectual schools, such as Kalam (scholastic theology), Peripatetic philosophy, illuminationist theosophy, Sufism, and the "transcendent theosophy" of the School of Isfahan. May be repeated as the topic changes. Previously offered as RLS 408, this course is now offered as both AAS 380 and RLS 380.

Prerequisite: AAS/RLS 280

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 382: Japanese Buddhism

An introduction to the teachings and practices of two major schools of Japanese Buddhism: Zen and Pure Land. The course focuses on the writings of the founders of the important lineages within these schools. Formerly offered as RLS 406, this course is now offered as both AAS 382 and RLS 382. Not for credit in addition to the former RLS 406.

Prerequisite: AAS/RLS 260

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 387: Islam and Confucianism

The goal of this course is to compare the basic teachings of Islam and Confucianism concerning the correct way to achieve true human status. Special stress will be placed on books that Muslim scholars wrote in Chinese beginning in the seventeenth century. These books employed Neo-Confucian language to introduce Chinese Muslims to their own theology, cosmology, and spiritual psychology, thus providing a rare pre-modern example of inter-religious dialogue. This course is offered as both AAS 387 and RLS 387.

Prerequisites: AAS 260 or RLS 260 or AAS 280 or RLS 280; U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 391: Humanities Topics in Asian and Asian American Studies

Past topics have included titles such as Sikhism; Introduction to Indian Philosophy; Modern Indian Literature; and Appreciating Indian Music. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 392: Social Science Topics in Asian and Asian American Studies

Topics may include titles such as Indian Grammatical Tradition, English in Asia, and Indian Economics. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within social sciences disciplines such as history, economics, political science, and linguistics. Students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the methods social scientists use to explore social phenomena, and knowledge of the major concepts, models, and issues of the social science discipline(s) studied. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

AAS 400: Seminar in Korean Studies

A seminar for upper-division students in the Korean studies minor, exploring in depth a single theme chosen to illustrate the relations among literary, religious, philosophical, historical, and cultural aspects of Korean life. Use of original texts and other materials is emphasized. May be repeated once as topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one 200-level course in Korean Studies

3 credits

AAS 401: Senior Seminar in Asian and Asian American Studies

An intensive study of the theoretical and methodological issues in Asian and Asian American Studies, examining the intellectual histories and political contexts of 'area' and 'ethnic' studies and their relationship to broader interdisciplinary research and public discourse. Possible topics may include history, memory, and representation; Asian American social activism; global/local interactions; and the politics of national identity and security.

Prerequisites: U4 standing; AAS major

SBC:     SPK, WRTD

3 credits

AAS 404: Senior Seminar in China Studies

An intensive in-depth study of key texts and issues relating to China Studies. Emphasizes critical scrutiny of original source materials and close reading of interpretative commentaries, as well as constructive debate and analytical writing at an advanced level. Focal topic varies with offering, ranging from the literary to the political, from the classical canon to contemporary social concerns.

Prerequisite: U4 status; completion of upper-division writing requirement for AAS majors; permission of instructor for non-AAS majors or non-CNS minors

3 credits

AAS 447: Directed Readings in Asian and Asian American Studies

Independent readings in advanced topics in Asian and Asian American studies. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; permission of instructor

1-6 credits

AAS 458: Speak Effectively Before an Audience

A zero credit course that may be taken in conjunction with a 300 or 400 level AAS course, with permission of the instructor. The course teaches effective discussion and satisfies Stony Brook Curriculum's SPK requirement.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor

SBC:     SPK

S/U grading

AAS 459: Write Effectively in Asian and Asian American Studies

A zero credit course that may be taken in conjunction with any 300- or 400-level AAS course, with permission of the instructor. The course teaches the skills and techniques of effective academic writing and satisfies Stony Brook Curriculum's WRTD requirement.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor

SBC:     WRTD

S/U grading

AAS 472: Topics in Asian Philosophy (I)

Designed for upper-division students, this course presents in-depth study of a specific topic in an Asian philosophical tradition. Students are expected to demonstrate knowledge through mastery of native terms and concepts from that tradition. May be repeated as the topic changes. This course is offered as both AAS 472 and PHI 472.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status; two courses in PHI, in AAS or together

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 473: Orientalism

Investigation of the history and theory of Western engagement with Asian cultures. Following from Edward Said's influential book Orientalism, we examine the alleged imperialism inherent in the study of the Orient, also considering some opponents of Said's thesis. Special attention is paid to the history of interpretation of Asian philosophies in the West, and of Asian postcolonial responses to such portrayals. We conclude by exploring the possibilities for post-orientalist approaches to the study of Asia.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 status; two courses in PHI, in AAS or together

DEC:     J
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

AAS 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Students assist instructors in Asian and Asian American studies courses with large enrollments. Under the supervision of the course instructor, they are responsible for conducting discussion and review sections and helping students with course readings and assignments.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; permission of instructor

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

AAS 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisites: AAS 475; permission of instructor

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

AAS 487: Supervised Research in Asian and Asian American Studies

Independent research under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated to a limit of 6 credits.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; permission of instructor

0-3 credits

AAS 488: Internship

Participation in a local, state, or federal governmental agency or community organization. Students are required to submit progress reports to their department sponsor and a final report on their experience to the department faculty. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and undergraduate program director

SBC:     EXP+

0-6 credits, S/U grading

AAS 495: Senior Honors Project in AAS

This is a course for AAS majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. The project involves independent readings or research and the writing of a thesis. Not for major credit.

Prerequisite: Admission to the AAS Honors Program; permission of department

3 credits

KOR: Korean

KOR 101: Intensive Elementary Korean

An intensive, 6-credit, elementary-level Korean language course that provides foundational knowledge and skills including pronunciation, basic everyday conversational proficiency, principles of character formation, basic grammatical rules, and basic cultural norms and preferences that govern language use. Drawing upon a communicative approach, this course situates oral and written language in real-life contexts and promotes learner-centered, interactive classroom activities. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Korean in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take KOR 101 without written permission from the supervisor of the course. May not be taken for credit after any other course in Korean.

DEC:     S3
SBC:     LANG

6 credits

KOR 111: Elementary Korean I

An introduction to spoken and written Korean with equal attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Fundamental communication skills are acquired through intensive study of basic grammar and pronunciation. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Korean in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take KOR 111 without written permission from the supervisor of the course.

4 credits

KOR 112: Elementary Korean II

An introduction to spoken and written Korean with equal attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Fundamental communication skills are acquired through intensive study of basic grammar and pronunciation. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Korean in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take KOR 112 without written permission from the supervisor of the course.

Prerequisite: KOR 111

DEC:     S3
SBC:     LANG

4 credits

KOR 211: Intermediate Korean I

Intermediate courses in Korean language to develop audiolingual skills and reading and writing ability. Through the introduction of complex grammatical structures and idioms, speaking, reading, and writing ability in Korean language is further developed.

Prerequisite: KOR 112 or placement test

DEC:     S3
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

KOR 212: Intermediate Korean II

Intermediate courses in Korean language to develop audiolingual skills and reading and writing ability. Through the introduction of complex grammatical structures and idioms, speaking, reading, and writing ability in Korean language is further developed.

Prerequisite: KOR 211 or placement test

DEC:     S3
SBC:     GLO, HUM

3 credits

KOR 311: Advanced Korean

An advanced course designed for students who wish to enhance reading comprehension and writing ability in Korean. Reading materials are selected from modern Korean literature, journals, and newspapers. Students are trained in samples of various writing styles. Emphasis is also placed on the idiomatic usage of Korean language and the relation of Korean to Chinese characters.

Prerequisite: KOR 212 or placement test

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

KOR 312: Advanced Korean II

Advanced Korean II is designed for students who have completed at least two years of Korean instruction at the undergraduate level or who already possess a sufficiently high level of fluency. Classes are conducted in Korean. Reading materials, including excerpts from modern Korean literary works, journals, magazines and newspapers, will be explored and discussed. Other topics such as ancient Korean literature will also be discussed. Through this course students are expected to enhance their ability to grasp the import of literary and academic texts by learning to identify essential points and lines of argument as well as enhance their vocabulary, particularly Sino-Korean terms, and knowledge of idiomatic usage of Chinese-Korean graph dictionaries, including a knowledge of the basic structure of graphs and of the most common component radicals, in their original and abbreviated forms. Students will also learn to research in Korean for their term paper.

Prerequisite: KOR 311 or approval of instructor

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

KOR 331: Social Science Topics in Korean Studies

An investigation of a specific area of Korean studies in the social and behavioral sciences. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisites: Two courses in Asian studies

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

KOR 332: Humanities Topics in Korean Studies

An investigation of a specific area of Korean studies in the humanities. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisites: Two courses in Asian studies

DEC:     G
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

KOR 411: Advanced Korean III

An advanced course designed for the fourth-year students of Korean to strengthen their ability to understand, speak, read, and write Korean. Students will read a variety of Korean texts including newspaper/magazine articles, biographies, and literary works and write creatively and/or professionally using sophisticated vocabulary and advanced hanja characters. Students will also be trained to comprehend authentic spoken Korean, using a variety of audio-visual materials and to communicate in Korean, applying appropriate socio-cultural norms. Students will also learn to research in Korean for their term paper.

Prerequisite: KOR 312 or placement test

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

KOR 412: Advanced Korean IV

An advanced course designed for the fourth-year students of Korean to strengthen their ability to understand, speak, read, and write Korean. Students will read a variety of Korean texts including newspaper/magazine articles, biographies, and literary works and write creatively and/or professionally using sophisticated vocabulary and advanced hanja characters. Students will also be trained to comprehend authentic spoken Korean, using a variety of audio-visual materials and to communicate in Korean, applying appropriate socio-cultural norms. Not intended for international students from Korea who are part of a two-plus-two or exchange program.

Prerequisite: KOR 411 or placement test

DEC:     S3
SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

KOR 426: Structure of Korean

This course is an introduction to phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, lexicon, and writing systems of the Korean language as well as the use and functions of the language in relation to the social structures of Korea at large. The goal of this course is to analyze Korean in ways that might be of most use to a KFL (Korean as a foreign language) teacher and KFL student.

Prerequisite: KOR 312

SBC:     HFA+

3 credits

KOR 447: Independent Study

Directed reading and research in Korean studies. Limited to Korean studies minors or upper-division students working on advanced problems in Korean studies. May be repeated. Previously offered as KRH and KRS 447.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; permission of instructor

1-6 credits

KOR 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; permission of instructor

3 credits, S/U grading

KOR 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisites: KOR 475; permission of instructor and director of Korean Studies minor

DEC:     S3
SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

KOR 487: Supervised Research in Korean Studies

Independent research under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated to a limit of 6 credits.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; permission of instructor

0-3 credits

KOR 488: Internship

Participation in a local, state, or federal governmental agency or community organization. Students are required to submit progress reports to their department sponsor and a final report on their experience to the department faculty. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and undergraduate program director

0-6 credits, S/U grading