POL: Political Science

POL 101: World Politics

Analysis of the basic concepts and issues of international relations in the contemporary international system. The behaviors of states and their decision makers are considered according to various models of national and international conflict. The relationship between the characteristics of nations and their foreign policies is studied on a comparative basis.

DEC:     F
SBC:     GLO, SBS

3 credits

POL 102: Introduction to American Government

What the informed citizen and specialist should know about the organization of American government, including the Constitution and what it means today, the Congress, political parties, pressure groups, growth of the Presidency, the Supreme Court, judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and the Bill of Rights. May not be taken for credit in addition to POL 105.

DEC:     F & 4
SBC:     SBS, USA

3 credits

POL 103: Introduction to Comparative Politics

Analysis of political institutions and processes in the contemporary world, emphasizing the interaction of political structures and processes in a variety of political settings.

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS

3 credits

POL 201: Introduction to Statistical Methods in Political Science

Elementary statistical methods in empirical political science, focusing on the analysis of public opinion, survey research designs, sampling, and probability. The course considers the application of descriptive and inferential statistics to testing hypotheses on various political issues. May not be taken for credit after AMS 102, ECO 320, PSY 201, or SOC 202. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of entry skill in mathematics requirement; Advisory Prerequisite: POL 101 or 102 or 103 or 105

DEC:     C
SBC:     QPS

3 credits

POL 214: Modern Latin America

From independence to the present: the evolution of 19th- and 20th-century Latin America. Emphasis on current social, economic, and political issues. This course is offered as both HIS 214 and POL 214.

Advisory Prerequisite: LAC 200

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

POL 216: History of U.S.-Latin American Relations

An examination of the impact of U.S. economic and political relations with Latin America from the mid-19th century to the present. The course considers changes in American policy toward Latin America, as well as the varying responses of Latin American nations to U.S. intervention and influence. This course is offered as both HIS 216 and POL 216.

Advisory Prerequisite: One HIS course

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO

3 credits

POL 287: Introductory Research in Political Science

May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits, but only six credits may count for major or minor requirements in political science.

Prerequisite: Permission of departmental research coordinator

SBC:     ESI

0-3 credits, S/U grading

POL 305: Government and Politics of the United Kingdom

Examination of the political system of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, including the Constitution, parliament, cabinet, political parties, and the policy-making process.

Prerequisite: POL 103; U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 309: Politics in the European Union

Why the European Union was created, how its institutions have evolved over time, and where the union is going.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 101 and 103

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 310: Immigration and Refugee Politics

Provides an introduction to the politics of immigration and refugees by considering the impact of the movement and resettlement of foreigners across international borders on states, societies, and international relations. We will address several themes that generate heated debate within the topic of migration including, why people move, the impact of ethnic and religious diversity, state control over its borders, racism and xenophobia, immigrant integration strategies, citizenship policies, refugee movements, globalization, security and human smuggling.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing or approval of professor

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 311: Introduction to International Law

Casebook approach to standard introductory course in international law, including the following topics: state jurisdiction and responsibility, individuals, international organization, and use of force.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing;

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 101

3 credits

POL 313: Problems of International Relations

Analysis of the international system, its characteristic forms, and the principal forces making for conflict and adjustment. Examination of some prevalent analytical concepts, of major current problems and developments, and of prospects and alternatives for the future.

Prerequisite: POL 101; U3 or U4 standing. Advisory Prerequisite: POL 201 or any other course satisfying the major's methodology requirement

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 317: American Election Campaigns

The politics of presidential nominations through primaries, caucuses, and conventions; the conduct of presidential general election campaigns; mass media coverage and opinion polling; the citizen's involvement in campaign politics; voter attitudes toward parties, candidates, and issues; and the interpretation of electoral outcomes.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 102 or 105

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 318: Voters and Elections

An examination of how citizens make electoral decisions, including the decision to participate at all in elections. The course compares models of voter behavior and probes the influence of such factors as party identification, opinions on issues, ideological orientations, and candidate evaluations. In addition, the social and economic context of voting is explored, as is the importance of elections for policy making and the functioning of the political system.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; Advisory Prerequisite: POL 102 or 105; POL 201 or any other course satisfying the major's methodology requirement

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 319: Business Law

A study of the legal environment of business operations, covering such topics as the principle of contracts, commercial papers, partnerships, corporations, real property, estates, bankruptcy, antitrust laws, and environmental and civil rights regulations.

Prerequisite: U3/U4 standing or New Transfer student

3 credits

POL 320: Constitutional Law and Politics: United States

A study of the role of the modern Supreme Court within the political and governmental process; its relation with Congress, the Presidency, state and local governments, parties, and interest groups; and the Court?s policy-making role in economic regulation.

Prerequisites: POL 102 or 105; U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 322: The Presidency in the American Political System

How presidential power developed historically; from what sources the powers of the modern Presidency emanate; how decisions are made in the presidential institution; how and to what degree presidential power may or ought to be controlled.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 102 or 105

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 323: U.S. Congress

An examination of the most powerful legislative institution in America. The historical background of Congress is examined along with its internal organization, rules, and relationship to the rest of government and to the world outside Washington.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 102 or 105

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 324: American Political Parties and Pressure Groups

An examination of political party organization, political leadership, finance, campaign techniques, and legal controls over parties; the functions and methods of pressure groups and their interaction with policy makers; the historical origins and development of the American party system; the significance of parties and pressure groups for democratic ideology; and the problems of political leadership in a democracy.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 102 or 105

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 325: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

A systematic treatment of leading Supreme Court decisions in such areas as freedom of speech, the press, and religion; the rights of criminal defendants; voting rights; the right to privacy; and discrimination on grounds of race, sex, poverty, illegitimacy, and alienage.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 320

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 327: Urban Politics

Covering the development of urban settlements from the early 19th century to the contemporary period, the course emphasizes both the formal and informal political institutions and processes in American cities and suburbs, including governmental structures, political parties, interest groups, and service delivery systems. Special attention is given to the multiethnic and multicultural context within which urban politics in the Unites States takes place. Among the topics examined is the historical development of urban settlements in the United States, studying both the growth of cities and suburbs and the ever-changing relationship between these types of settlements evident at different times in our history.

Prerequisite: POL 102 or POL 105

DEC:     K
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 328: Criminal Law

A survey of substantive and procedural criminal law as it applies to traditional and contemporary penal issues, including a review of relevant U.S. and New York constitutional, statutory, and case law provisions.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 320

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 330: Gender Issues in the Law

A critical exploration of American law that specifically addresses the issues of (in)equality of women and men in the United States. The course surveys and analyzes cases from the pre-Civil War era to the end of the 20th century dealing with various manifestations of sex discrimination, decided in the federal court system, typically by the Supreme Court, and the state court system. The course also considers how the political nature of the adjudicative process has ramifications for the decisions rendered by a court. This course is offered as both POL 330 and WST 330.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 102 or 105 or WST 102 (formerly SSI/WST 102)

DEC:     K
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 332: Politics of Criminal Due Process

A survey of the procedural steps through which a criminal case passes commencing with the initial investigation of a crime, covering the laws and court rules governing arrest, search and seizure, bail and fair trial, and concluding with the unconditional release of an offender.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 102 or 105

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 333: Environmental Law

Survey of the origins of environmental law and the major legislation enacted by Congress and the state of New York. Special emphasis is placed on the application of environmental law to the problem of solid waste management on Long Island. This course is offered as both ENS 333 and POL 333.

Prerequisites: ECO 108; POL 102

3 credits

POL 336: U.S. Foreign Policy

An examination of the central problems in making U.S. foreign policy. The particular system and structure of foreign policy making as they have evolved from the constitutional and historical roots of the United States are the focus. An important central theme is the potential tension between the demands of effective foreign policy and democratic restraints.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 101 or 102 or 103 or 105

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 337: The Politics of Africa

A study of nationalism, political thought, and political institutions in Africa. Consideration is given to the quest for unity, the problems of liberation, and the political implications of social change. This course is offered as both AFS 337 and POL 337.

Prerequisites: Two AFS or POL courses

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 338: Contemporary India: History, Politics, and Diplomacy

Study of the forces shaping India's post-independence history, domestic politics, and foreign diplomacy. As the world's largest democracy, second most populous nation, and Asia's second fastest growing economy, its impact on the international scene in the coming years will be carefully analyzed. The course, taught by a former Ambassador, will also focus on emerging trends in Indo-U.S. relations and impact of the Indian diaspora. This course is offered as both AAS 338 and POL 338.

Prerequisites: One previous course in AAS or POL; U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, SBS+

3 credits

POL 339: Contemporary China: History, Politics, and Diplomacy

This course will analyze the evolution of major events in contemporary China following the communist revolution that led to the establishment of the People's Republic in 1949. The course, taught by a former Ambassador, will examine major political, economic, and social developments in light of both their general global impact and their particular relationship with the U.S. This course is offered as both AAS 339 and POL 339.

Prerequisites: AAS 219 or POL 101; U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     J
SBC:     GLO, SBS+

3 credits

POL 344: American Political Ideology and Public Opinion

An examination of the nature of contemporary political ideology and public opinion in the United States. The goal is to understand political conflict and debate in the U.S. and the ways in which the public influences that debate. Major topics in public opinion include political tolerance and trust, attitudes toward women and African Americans, the role of the mass media, and the impact of political values and ideology on political campaigns and elections.

Prerequisites: POL 102 or 105; C or higher in POL 201 or any other course satisfying the major's methodology requirement

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 346: Political Psychology

Focus on the application of psychological concepts and measures to political behavior. Course topics include attitude measurement, stability and change, obedience to authority, learning theory, attention and problem solving, personality correlates of political activity, and stress and aggression.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 347: Women and Politics

Analysis of the role of women in current American politics -- their electoral participation, office seeking, and political beliefs -- and policy issues that have special relevance to women. The course traces the history of American women's political involvement and the historical trajectory of gender-related policy from the mid-19th century to today. This course is offered as both POL 347 and WST 347.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 102 or 105

DEC:     K
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 348: Political Beliefs and Judgments

Following a review of the literature on political attitudes, the course applies psychological concepts and experimental approaches to the study of the content and structure of political beliefs and judgments.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; Advisory Prereq: POL 201 or any other course satisfying the major's methodology requirement

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 350: Contemporary European Political Theory

Analysis of major writings in European political thought throughout the 20th century, focusing on four important ideological groupings: liberalism, socialism, fascism, and conservatism, with consideration of their historical antecedents.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 351: Social Surveys in Contemporary Society

An interdisciplinary course on the history, uses, design, and implementation of the social survey. Emphasis is given to the use of surveys in politics, the media, and business.

Prerequisites: POL 201 or any other course satisfying the major's methodology requirement; U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

POL 357: India's Foreign Policy

A critical anaylsis of the foreign policy of India since Independence in 1947, especially Non-alignment and relations with major powers. The factors behind India's entry into the nuclear club and its impact on her international relations within the subcontinent and beyond. Analysis of issues such as Kashmir, terrorism, India's quest for a permanent seat in the U.N. Security Council, economic reforms, and role of Indian diaspora to the country's relations with the countries of their adoption.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing or permission of instructor

Advisory Prerequisites: AAS 201 and 348

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 359: Public Policy Analysis

A course analyzing the connection between the administrative processes of government in the United States and the public policy process. It focuses on the analysis of policy formulation and the broader connections between public policy and the American political process.

Prerequisites: POL 102 or 105; U3 or U4 standing

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 365: Economy and Democracy

An examination of the interplay between economics and politics in Western democracies. Topics include the economic theory of democracy; the political-business cycle; political parties and economic policies; the economy and voter choices in elections; economic performance and government (especially presidential) popularity; and the formation of economic expectations.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; Advisory Prerequisite: POL 102 or 105; POL 201 or any other course satisfying the major's methodology requirement

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 367: Mass Media in American Politics

Competing theories of the power of the press are tested by examining the literature on mass media effects on what the public thinks and what the public thinks about. Various explanations of why news organizations behave as they do are also assessed. Conflicts between freedom of the press and such values as privacy, national security, and the right to fair trial are discussed. The relationships between freedom of the press and the public's right to know are also explored.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 102 or 105

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 372: Politics in the Third World

Analysis of problems and prospects of nonindustrialized nations that are experiencing political and economic development. Particular attention is paid to the impact of colonialism, social problems, economic modernization, and foreign policy orientations of Third World nations.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 101 or 103

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 374: Global Issues in the United Nations

An overview of key issues and contemporary debate in the United Nations toward an understanding of its formal and informal operations. Issues include peace and security; human rights; development and trade; and the global environment. Consideration of perspectives of people from outside the United States and the West; the major obstacles to effective international cooperation in the U.N. and the ways these obstacles might be overcome; and how democratic governance is affected by the rise of global institutions and governance. This course offered as both POL and SOC 374.

Prerequisite: SOC 105 or POL 101 or 103

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 377: Contemporary Political Philosophy (II)

A critical examination of selected issues in contemporary political philosophy, for example, the nature and justification of basic rights, the legitimization of political authority, and the various relations between ideals of social justice and democratic rule. Readings represent contemporary views such as libertarianism, liberalism, socialism, communitarianism, and feminism, and include selections by authors such as Arendt, Dworkin, Foucault, Habermas, Pateman and Rawls. This course is offered as both PHI 377 and POL 377.

Prerequisite: PHI 105 or PHI 277 or two courses in philosophy or one in philosophy and one in political science

SBC:     CER, HFA+

3 credits

POL 382: Politics and Political Change in Latin America

An examination of revolutionary and reformist movements that have shaped the political, social, and economic contours of 20th-century Latin America. Topics include the Mexican and Cuban revolutions, populism, urban squatter movements, and guerrilla warfare. This course is offered as both HIS 382 and POL 382.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: HIS 213 or HIS/POL 214 or HIS/POL 216 or LAC 200

DEC:     J
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 390: Topics in Political Science

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one POL course announced with topic

3 credits

POL 391: Topics in Political Science

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one POL course announced with topic

3 credits

POL 392: Topics in Political Science and the European Tradition

Topics may include, for example, politics during the time of the French Revolution, or contemporary Italian politics. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic relating to Western civilization. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the development of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of Western civilization, and relate it to that of other regions in the world. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; one POL course announced with topic

DEC:     I
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

POL 401: Seminar in Advanced Topics

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

3 credits

POL 402: Seminar in Advanced Topics

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

3 credits

POL 403: Seminar in Advanced Topics

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

3 credits

POL 404: Seminar in Advanced Topics

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

3 credits

POL 411: Science, Technology, and Arms Control

A study of the application of scientific technology to national defense, covering nuclear weapons and delivery systems, chemical and biological weapons, conventional weapons systems, defense research and development, arms control and disarmament negotiations, and international technology transfer.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing; one D.E.C. E or SNW course

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

POL 412: Intelligence Organizations, Technology, and Democracy

The role of intelligence organizations in decision making through analysis of agency practices in support of U.S. national security policy. The course also explores the roles of intelligence agencies and practices in democratic societies.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; POL 101 and 102; one D.E.C. category E course

3 credits

POL 434: Supreme Court Decision Making

A comprehensive examination of Supreme Court decision making, aided by analysis of a computer database on the court. The course covers various stages of the judicial process, including the decision to grant certiorari, the decision on the merits, majority-opinion assignment, and majority-opinion coalitions.

Prerequisites: POL 201 or any other course satisfying the major's methodology requirement; U3 or U4 standing

Advisory Prerequisite: POL 320

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS

3 credits

POL 447: Directed Readings in Political Science

Individually supervised readings in selected topics of the discipline. May be repeated, but total credit may not exceed six credits.

Prerequisites: Political science major with U3 or U4 standing; 15 credits in political science; permission of instructor and department

1-6 credits

POL 458: Speak Effectively Before an Audience

A zero credit course that may be taken in conjunction with any POL course that provides opportunity to achieve the learning outcomes of the Stony Brook Curriculum's SPK learning objective.

Pre- or corequisite: WRT 102 or equivalent; permission of the instructor

SBC:     SPK

S/U grading

POL 459: Write Effectively in Political Science

A zero credit course that may be taken in conjunction with any 300- or 400-level POL course, with permission of the instructor. The course provides opportunity to practice the skills and techniques of effective academic writing and satisfies the learning outcomes of the Stony Brook Curriculum's WRTD learning objective.

Prerequisite: WRT 102; permission of the instructor

SBC:     WRTD

S/U grading

POL 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. Not for major credit.

Prerequisites: Political science major; U4 standing; permission of instructor

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

POL 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. The course in which the student is permitted to work as a teaching assistant must be different from the course in which he or she previously served. Not for major credit.

Prerequisites: POL 475; permission of instructor and department

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

POL 487: Directed Research

Qualified advanced undergraduates in political science may carry out individual research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated but total credits may not exceed six credits.

Prerequisites: Political science major; 15 credits in political science; permission of instructor and department; permission of departmental research coordinator may be substituted.

0-6 credits

POL 488: Internship

Participation in a local, state, or federal governmental agency or community organization. Students are required to submit progress reports to their department sponsor and a final report on their experience to the department faculty. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: Political science major or minor with 3.00 g.p.a.; 15 credits in political science; permission of instructor and department

SBC:     EXP+

0-6 credits, S/U grading

POL 489: Washington or Albany Internship

Designed so that students can participate in Washington, D.C. at the Washington Center as interns in private or public sector organizations and agencies or in Albany as interns in the New York State Assembly or Senate Program. Students are supervised by selected practitioners within the organization or agency. Students are required to submit journals of experience and observation which, together with the supervisor's report, become the basis for a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade. Only three credits may be applied to major requirements.

Prerequisites: Completion of pre-application orientation; admission to Washington Center or NY State Assembly or Senate Program; POL major or minor; 3.00 g.p.a.; 15 credits in POL; sponsorship of a political science faculty member

Corequisite: POL 490

SBC:     EXP+

12 credits, S/U grading

POL 490: Washington or Albany Seminar

Seminar offered in Washington, D.C. as part of the internship program of the Washington Center or in Albany as part of the New York State Assembly or Senate Internship Program. The seminars are taught by people with experience in public and private agencies, public policy formulation, and relevant academic and professional experience. Students are offered work in several program areas designed to complement their internships, such as law and justice, congressional studies, policy studies, community urban service, and studies in government.

Prerequisites: Completion of pre-application orientation; admission to Washington Center or NY State Assembly or Senate Program; POL major or minor; 3.00 g.p.a.; 15 credits in POL; sponsorship of a political science faculty member

Corequisite: POL 489

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits

POL 495: Senior Honors Project in Political Science

First course of a two-semester project for political science majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. Arranged in consultation with the department, the project involves independent study and the writing of a research paper under close supervision of a faculty member. Students enrolled in POL 495 are obliged to complete POL 496. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence.

Prerequisite: Admission to the political science honors program

3 credits

POL 496: Senior Honors Project in Political Science

Second course of a two-semester project for political science majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. Arranged in consultation with the department, the project involves independent study and the writing of a research paper under close supervision of a faculty member. Students enrolled in POL 495 are obliged to complete POL 496. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence.

SBC:     ESI, WRTD

3 credits