PSY: Psychology

PSY 103: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to research and theory in psychology in such areas as learning, perception, cognition, biopsychology, development, personality, and abnormal and social psychology. As part of the course, students must participate in experiments and/or a library research project.

DEC:     F
SBC:     CER, SBS

3 credits

PSY 201: Statistical Methods in Psychology

The use and interpretation of elementary statistical techniques in research, emphasizing descriptive statistics, correlational analysis, and inferential statistics, including chi-square, t-tests, and an introduction to the Analysis of Variance. May not be taken for credit after AMS 102, ECO 320, POL 201, or SOC 202. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

Prerequisites: PSY 103; satisfaction of entry skill in mathematics requirement

DEC:     C
SBC:     QPS

3 credits

PSY 220: Survey in Developmental Psychology

A study of the growth processes from fetal development to late childhood. Perceptual and learning characteristics are explained as they relate to increases in cognitive and social competence in the total community. Biological factors are examined as they relate to inheritance of behavior patterns.

Prerequisite: PSY 103

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

PSY 230: Survey in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology

Examines the description, etiology, course, and treatment of psychological disorders. Current theory and research are emphasized.

Prerequisite: PSY 103

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

PSY 240: Survey in Social Psychology

A presentation of various topics in social psychology including interpersonal processes, obedience to authority, social perception, attitude change, attraction and liking, and aggression and violence, especially as applied to national and international issues.

Prerequisite: PSY 103

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

PSY 250: Survey in Biopsychology

Introduction to the neural basis of sensory processes, motor control, attention, emotion, and learning.

Prerequisite: PSY 103 or BIO 101 or 150

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+, STEM+

3 credits

PSY 260: Survey in Cognition and Perception

A survey of theoretical and empirical work on human cognition and perception including pattern recognition, memory, attention, language comprehension, decision making, and problem solving.

Prerequisite: PSY 103

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+, STEM+

3 credits

PSY 273: Supervised Research in Psychology

Initial training and participation in techniques or duties related to a specific laboratory or field research experience under the direct supervision of a faculty member or advanced graduate student in the Department of Psychology. Students may take two sections in a single semester, but no more than three credits may be applied to a section. May not be taken for more than six credits per faculty advisor during the student's career.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

0-6 credits, S/U grading

PSY 283: Applications and Community Service

Designed to provide opportunities for students to study and apply psychological principles outside the classroom (e.g., in settings such as hospitals and schools). Specific programs vary from semester to semester. General information is available in the Psychology Undergraduate Office. May be repeated up to a limit of six credits.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

1-3 credits, S/U grading

PSY 285: Practicum in Infant/Toddler or Preschool Development and Education

Students work nine hours a week in a full-day child care center on campus with infants/toddlers or preschool-aged children (Section numbers 1 and 2 denote assignment to infants/toddlers; Section numbers 3 and 4 are the practicum with preschool-aged children). Students gain practical experience in infancy or preschool development and education through guiding, teaching, preparing age-appropriate materials, and observing. Students maintain daily journals; they also plan, develop, and implement appropriate educational activities that provide some of the basis for discussion and evaluation in the corequisite seminar, PSY 385. This course requires students to use knowledge gained in PSY 385 in a closely supervised situation. Can be repeated once by enrolling in a section that focuses on a different age group.

Prerequisite: CFS 210 or CFS 322 or PSY 220 or PSY 325 or PSY 326; permission of instructor

Corequisite: PSY 385

3 credits, S/U grading

PSY 301: Advanced Statistics

Survey of probability and sampling theory, descriptive and inferential statistics, and introduction to experimental design.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 310: Research and Writing in Psychology

An introduction to and critical analysis of the methodology of psychological research. In addition to attending lectures taught by faculty, students work closely with a graduate instructor and peers in small breakout sections to prepare a research proposal. Not for credit in addition to the discontinued PSY 300. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

Prerequisites: PSY 103; PSY 201 or any other course satisfying the department's statistics requirement

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+, SPK, WRTD

4 credits

PSY 325: Children's Cognitive Development

A survey of the basic principles of cognition from experimental research with children. Topics include perceptual development, language development, memory development, conceptual development, and the development of academic skills.

Prerequisites: PSY 220

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 326: Children's Social and Emotional Development

Current theories, models, research methods, and findings in the study of children's socioemotional development. The course emphasizes the interaction of the individual with his or her social environment in developmental processes and outcomes. Eras covered include infancy, toddler/preschool, mid-late childhood, and adolescence.

Prerequisites: PSY 220; PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 327: Human Growth and Development in the Educational Context

The biological and psychological development of childhood and adolescence that affects teaching and curriculum development for diverse learners. Additional topics include childhood and adolescent psychiatric disorders, special education programs, drug and alcohol use and abuse, and societal issues. Formerly SSE 327 and SSI 327. Not for credit in addition to SSE 327 or SSI 327.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; admission to a teacher education program, or admission in the Psychology major

3 credits

PSY 329: Special Topics in Developmental Psychology

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: PSY 220

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 333: Mood Disorders

The mood disorders include bipolar (manic-depressive) and depressive disorders. They are among the most common psychological disorders, and are a tremendous personal, social, and economic burden. This course will provide an introduction to current theory and research on the mood disorders, including their classification, epidemiology, course, etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment. Not for credit in addition to PSY 339 with topic of "Mood Disorders."

Prerequisite: PSY 230

3 credits

PSY 334: Autism and Intellectual Disability

Study of concepts, procedures, and research related to autism, mental retardation, and other developmental disabilities from a psychological and educational perspective. Topics to be dealt with include: assessment, family roles, development of communication, social development, cognitive development, sensory and motor development, adaptive behaviors, problem behaviors, instructional strategies, comprehensive programs, public policy legal issues, personnel preparation, methodological and research issues, and future directions for disability research and practice.

Prerequisite: PSY 230

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 220

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

PSY 335: Clinical Behavior Modification

The application of behavioral and cognitive sciences to the assessment and treatment of clinical problems. The aims of the course are to familiarize the student with the theoretical and empirical foundations of clinical behavior modification, provide examples of applications to a variety of different clinical problems, and discuss the results of outcome studies. While specific treatment methods are described and issues related to clinical application are discussed, no actual clinical training or practicum is provided in this course.

Prerequisite: PSY 230

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 337: Applied Behavior Analysis/Positive Behavior Support

Exploration of concepts, procedures, and research related to applied behavior analysis/positive behavior support, an approach that involves the application of principles derived from behavioral, community, and ecological psychology to problems of social significance in the fields of clinical psychology, education, family life, and health. There is a focus on issues of assessment, intervention, and outcomes related to problem behavior, school performance, home-based support, community integration, and improving quality of life through systems change. Not for credit in addition to PSY 339 when the topic is Applied Behavior Anaylsis/Positive Behavior Support.

Prerequisite: PSY 103

Advisory Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

PSY 338: Behavior Deviation in Children

Development and modification of behavioral deviations in children; application of principles derived from experimental analysis of behavior to problems of children.

Prerequisites: PSY 220

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 339: Special Topics in Clinical Psychology

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: PSY 230

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 341: Psychology of Prejudice

An overview of theoretical perspectives, research methods, empirical findings, and practical applications of psychological research on prejudice. Topics include the development of prejudice among children; the role of cognitive, social, personality, and motivational factors in maintaining prejudice and stigma; the psychological consequences of prejudice and stigma; and strategies for reducing prejudice, stigma, and intergroup conflict.

Prerequisite: PSY 240

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 345: Theories of Personality

The study of the ways in which people differ. Examines traditional and current thinking and research about the nature and causes of the individual patterns of behavior, emotion, and thinking that we call personality.

Prerequisite: PSY 240

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 346: Health Psychology

The role of psychological factors in the maintenance of good health or in coping with illness. Topics include the modification of specific health behavior, such as alcoholism, obesity, lack of exercise, and smoking; the relationship of stress and illness; and coping with terminal illnesses.

Prerequisite: PSY 240

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 347: Psychology of Women

The psychological impact of important physiological and sociological events and epochs in the lives of women; menstruation, female sexuality, marriage, childbirth, and menopause; women and mental health, mental illness and psychotherapy; the role of women in the field of psychology. This course is offered as both PSY 347 and WST 377.

Prerequisite: WST major or minor; or one of the following: WST 102, WST 103, PSY 103, WST/SOC 247

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

PSY 348: Special Topics in Social Psychology

May be repeated as the topic changes.

3 credits

PSY 349: Special Topics in Social Psychology

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 355: Human Brain Function

The functional organization of the human brain, including dysfunctions resulting from various types of brain pathology. Neuroanatomical, neuropsychological, neurophysiological, and experimental psychological approaches are described.

Prerequisite: PSY 250

3 credits

PSY 356: Physiological Psychology

An advanced survey of the neurobiological bases of complex behavior. A review of basic neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, and neurochemistry is followed by considerations of the circuitry and neural processing supporting perception, motion, emotion, sleep, attention, learning, language, and higher cognitive mechanisms.

Prerequisite: PSY 250 or BIO 202 or BIO 203

3 credits

PSY 357: Animal Learning

Principles of adaptation and behavioral change with emphasis on techniques of reward and punishment and of stimulus control.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 358: Special Topics in Biopsychology

May be repeated as the topic changes.

3 credits

PSY 359: Special Topics in Biopsychology

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: PSY 250

3 credits

PSY 364: Judgment and Decision Making

An exploration of the psychological factors that influence judgment and decision making. Topics include how judgments and decisions ought to be made (e.g., rational decision making), systematic flaws in people's actual performance, and the neural systems that underlie decisions.

Prerequisite: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 365: The Psychology of Language

Examination of theories and research concerning the processes and representations that underlie language comprehension, production, and acquisition.

Prerequisite: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 366: Human Problem Solving

An exploration of human problem solving and critical thinking. Topics include memory strategies, the role of language in thinking, inductive and deductive reasoning, creativity, and the development of problem solving skills.

Prerequisite: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 367: Memory

A review of classic and current theories of memory and empirical research on memory in memory-intact and memory-impaired populations.

Prerequisite: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 368: Sensation and Perception

An examination of both the basic mechanisms and the organizational processes of visual and auditory perception. Topics include the perception of color, depth, movement, pitch, loudness, speech, and music.

Prerequisite: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 369: Special Topics in Cognition and Perception

May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: PSY 260

Advisory Prerequisite: PSY 310

3 credits

PSY 375: History and Systems of Psychology

History of psychology presented either as a development and testing of theories that emerge from a long philosophical tradition, or as a set of practices that serve particular social functions and respond to pressures from the socioeconomic context.

Prerequisites: Nine credits of psychology

3 credits

PSY 380: Research Lab: Human Cognition

Techniques and experimental methods to conduct research in cognition on a selection of topics such as perception and sensation, language, attention, or memory. Hands-on learning of research and reporting of research.

Prerequisites: PSY 310; permission of instructor

4 credits

PSY 382: Research Lab: Social Psychology

Techniques and experimental problems in social psychology, including natural observation, surveys, and experimental design. Three hours of lecture and two hours of field or laboratory research per week.

Prerequisites: PSY 240 and 310

SBC:     ESI, WRTD

4 credits

PSY 383: Behavioral Ecology Laboratory

This course is an introduction to and critical analysis of theory and research on animal behavior in natural and naturalistic settings. A field research study is major component of this course. This course is also only open to B.S. majors in Psychology and enrollment is limited.

Prerequisites: PSY 103 or 104; PSY 201 or AMS 102; PSY 310

SBC:     ESI, WRTD

4 credits

PSY 384: Research Lab: Human Factors

Current theories and empirical methods in the psychology of human-computer interaction. Students practice techniques in the research, design, and evaluation of human-computer interfaces.

Prerequisites: PSY 260 and 310; permission of department

SBC:     ESI, TECH, WRTD

4 credits

PSY 385: Seminar in Infant/Toddler or Preschool Development and Education

Seminar in development and education of infants/toddlers or preschool-aged children (Section numbers 1 and 2 are seminar on infants/toddlers; Section numbers 3 and 4 are seminar on preschool-aged children). Sections devoted to infants/toddlers focus on learning and living environments that foster emergent communication and language skills and promote social, cognitive, physical, and emotional development. Sections devoted to preschool-aged children focus on emergent literacy, science and math discovery, and multi-sensory experiences that enhance motor development and exploration of the arts. Strategies for problem solving and promotion of positive social interaction and emotional development, including active listening, limit-setting, conflict negotiation, and child initiated approaches are examined from a multicultural perspective. Students design age-appropriate curricula and implement them under instructor supervision within the co-requisite practicum, PSY 285. Can be repeated once by enrolling in a section that focuses on a different age group.Can be used once toward Psychology Department elective requirements.

Prerequisite: CFS 210 or CFS 322 or PSY 220 or PSY 325 or PSY 326; permission of instructor

Corequisite: PSY 285

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

PSY 386: Research Lab: Cultural Psychology

Research methods in cultural psychology, including natural observation, surveys, and experimental design. Three hours of lecture and two hours of field or laboratory research per week.

Prerequisite: PSY 310

4 credits

PSY 389: Research Lab: Special Topics

Research methods in varying topics in psychological research including natural observation, surveys, and experimental design. Three hours of lecture and two hours of field or laboratory research per week. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: PSY 310

4 credits

PSY 399: Junior Honors Seminar

First course of a three-semester research seminar on research in psychology. Topics investigated by faculty are reviewed. The class focuses on particular theories, methods, and results that illustrate the research process within the department. Students are expected to present oral and written proposals for their senior year research project.

Prerequisites: PSY 310; admission to psychology honors program

SBC:     ESI, WRTD

1 credit

PSY 447: Readings in Psychology

Directed readings under the guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated once.

Prerequisite: PSY 310

1-6 credits

PSY 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly assigned times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Prerequisites: PSY 310; U4 standing in psychology major; permission of instructor and department

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

PSY 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice.

Prerequisites: PSY 475; permission of instructor and department

SBC:     EXP+

3 credits, S/U grading

PSY 487: Independent Research in Psychology

Upper-division students interested in carrying out independent research projects under the auspices of a faculty member in the Department of Psychology may do so in this course. The student must propose and carry out the research project and must analyze and write up the results in a form acceptable to the sponsor. Written agreement by the faculty sponsor to undertake this responsibility and an outline of the project goals are filed with the Undergraduate Psychology Office. These become part of the student's departmental file. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; PSY 310; permission of department

0-6 credits

PSY 488: Internship

Participation in public and private agencies and organizations. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final written report on their experience to the faculty sponsor and department. May be repeated up to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: 12 credits in psychology including PSY 310; permission of the supervising faculty member and undergraduate director

SBC:     EXP+

0-6 credits, S/U grading

PSY 491: Advanced Seminar in Psychology

Special seminars covering current research theory. Topics are announced prior to the beginning of each semester. May be repeated up to a limit of 18 credits. Students may take two sections in a single semester. May not be taken for more than six credits per faculty member during the student's career.

Prerequisites: PSY 310; permission of instructor

1-3 credits

PSY 492: Advanced Seminar in Psychology

Special seminars covering current research theory. Topics are announced prior to the beginning of each semester. May be repeated up to a limit of 18 credits. Students may take two sections in a single semester. May not be taken for more than six credits per faculty member during the student's career.

Prerequisites: PSY 310; permission of instructor

1-3 credits

PSY 495: Senior Honors Seminar

Second course of a three-semester research seminar with continuing discussions of methods and theories relevant to honors research projects. Students are expected to design and execute a research project and submit a these under the supervision of appropriate faculty sponsorship. Students enrolled in PSY 495 are obliged to complete PSY 496. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence.

Prerequisite: PSY 399; permission of department

Corequisite: PSY 487

SBC:     ESI, WRTD

1 credit

PSY 496: Senior Honors Seminar

Third course of a three-semester research seminar with continuing discussions of methods and theories relevant to honors research projects. Students are expected to design and execute a research project and submit a these under the supervision of appropriate faculty sponsorship. Students enrolled in PSY 495 are obliged to complete PSY 496. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence.

Prerequisite: PSY 495; permission of department

Corequisite: PSY 487

SBC:     ESI, WRTD

1 credit