ANP: Biological Anthropology

ANP 120: Introduction to Biological Anthropology

An introduction to the evolutionary study of humankind based on a survey of the diversity and evolutionary history of primates. The development of scientific and evolutionary thought and method. The biological basis of inheritance and variation. Human variations and adaptations in relation to the environment. Physical characteristics and behavior of living primates. Evolution of primates and current research on human origins. ANP 121 is the associated laboratory component of ANP 120.

DEC:     E
SBC:     SNW

3 credits

ANP 121: Biological Anthropology Laboratory

Laboratory exploration of the fundamentals of Biological Anthropology based on a survey of the diversity and evolutionary history of humans and nonhuman primates. The development of scientific and evolutionary thought and method. The biological basis of inheritance and variation. Human variations and adaptations in relation to the environment. Physical characteristics and behavior of living primates. Evolution of primates and current research on human origins. Two hours of laboratory per week during which students will experience the research process, methods, and skills, and learn to collaborate in formal inquiry. Not for credit in addition to ANP 120 as offered prior to Fall 2010.

Corequisite: ANP 120

1 credit

ANP 200: The Evolution of Human Behavior

An examination of how evolutionary theory informs our understanding of human behavior, psychology and culture. Topics include assessing what behavioral traits are unique to humans and critical to our ecological expansion. Course will provide a synthetic overview of current topics in human behavioral ecology, evolutionary psychology, and gene-culture coevolution.

Prerequisite: ANP 120 or BIO 201 or BIO 202

DEC:     F
SBC:     SBS+

3 credits

ANP 201: Human Evolution

An overview of the evolution of the human lineage from its origins to the appearance of modern humans. Our evolutionary history involved some dramatic changes in anatomy and behavior, and we will explore both the significance of these changes, and the methods that scientists use interpret them. The human fossil record is abundant, and will be our central focus. Emphasis will be placed on how we learn things about the past, as well as what we know.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANP 120, GEO 102, GEO 103, GEO 109, or any BIO course

DEC:     E
SBC:     SNW

3 credits

ANP 220: Controversies in Human Biology and Behavior

The study of controversially debated issues in the work of Physical Anthropologists. Surveys general aspects of primate and human behavior, human variation and adaptation, and the evolution of humans and human ancestors exploring previous and recent debates that have centered around issues such as for example the concept of evolution, gender roles and mating systems, role of aggression, and the role of hunting and gathering.

Advisory prerequisite: Introductory Anthropology or Biology course

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

ANP 230: Computer-based Biostatistics

An introductory course in statistical analyses, specifically focusing on techniques relevant to research designs in the biological and anthropological sciences. The accompanying lab section will provide students with practical experience in using statistical software to run analyses.

Prerequisite: satisfaction of entry skill in mathematics requirement or level 2+ on the mathematics placement examination

DEC:     C
SBC:     QPS

4 credits

ANP 300: Human Anatomy

An introduction to the structure of the human body considered from both systems and regional approaches. Subject matter includes the musculoskeletal, respiratory, nervous, cardiovascular, digestive, and urogenital systems, together with an appreciation of these systems in a regional anatomical context. Laboratory sessions entail examination of plastic models, exercises in living anatomy and computer "dissection." Instructor permission required to repeat ANP 300. This course has been designated as a High Demand/Controlled Access (HD/CA) course. Students registering for HD/CA courses for the first time will have priority to do so.

Prerequisite: ANP 120 or one BIO course

DEC:     E
SBC:     STEM+

4 credits

ANP 304: Ecology of the Turkana Basin

With the world's longest sequence of datable deposits containing fossils of our ancestors, eastern Africa is the ideal place to examine humans' changing relations with our environment. This course familiarizes students with diverse ecological settings in the region today through tours and field exercises in highland forests, low-altitude grasslands, and lacustrine and riparian settings. Students learn various methods for paleoenvironmental reconstruction, and practice integrating different kinds of paleoenvironmental evidence in the field and laboratory facilities at TBI-Turkwel, Kenya. Examining modern vegetation and fauna in central and northwest Kenya shows students how human actions can degrade or conserve environments and resouces in eastern Africa today.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANP 305: Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoecology of the Turkana Basin

Vertebrate fossils are important sources of information about the appearance, evolution, and extinction of major organisms. As such, they provide a valuable window into changes in climate and selection pressures, and organisms' diverse adaptive responses to these changes. They are also significant in placing hominid discoveries within a relative local chronology, and helping reconstruct environments associated with hominid finds. This course acquaints students with methods of vertebrate paleontology employed in different chronological contexts of the Turkana Basin, used to solve diverse theoretical questions.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANP 306: Human Evolution in the Turkana Basin

The Turkana Basin is home to many paleoanthropological discoveries that fundamentally reshaped ideas about human evolution. Richard, Maeve, and Louise Leakey will share perspectives on eight of these finds, including Nariokotome ("Turkana boy") and KNM-WT1700 (the "Black Skull"). Lectures and readings for each discovery will cover: 1) the research questions and strategies that led to the find; 2) the kind of analyses that have yielded the most important interpretive conclusions about the find; 3) how this discovery reshaped views of the human past; and 4) what new directions it catalyzed in human evolution research. Class activities consist of lectures by the Leakeys, laboratory exercises (reconstructions, measurements) using casts of the 5 kinds, and field trips to discovery locations.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANP 307: Comparing Ecosystems in Madagascar

The major goal of this course is to introduce the biodiversity and diversity of ecosystems on the island of Madagascar. In addition to exploring the different habitats within Ranomafana National Park, we will embark on a ten-day trip across Madagascar.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANP 316: The Evolution of the Human Brain

Provides a detailed overview of how the human brain has evolved, placing it in a broader primate, mammalian, and vertebrate context. Emphasizing the interaction between brain and behavior, the course will detail how adaptation has shaped the brain across millions of years of evolution. The central theme throughout the course will be to what extent we can consider the human brain as 'special' compared with other species, and, if so, what sets it apart.

Prerequisite: ANP 120 or any Biology course

3 credits

ANP 321: Primate Evolution

The evolution of the order Primates from its origins to the appearance of the human family. Primate origins; the first primates of modern aspect; origins and adaptive radiations of monkeys; appearance and adaptations of apes and humans. Relevant topics in geology such as geochronology, paleogeography, taphonomy, and paleoecology.

Prerequisite: ANP 120

3 credits

ANP 325: Primate Behavior

An introduction to primate social systems and the factors that influence their maintenance and evolution, including foraging strategy, demographic processes, mating and rearing strategies, conflicts and coalitions, and communication.

Prerequisite: ANP 120

DEC:     E
SBC:     STEM+

3 credits

ANP 326: Lemurs of Madagascar

The course explores the biology, ecology, social behavior, and conservation of Madagascar�s lemurs. We will discuss case studies based on current field and captive research, in this way highlighting important principles in behavior and ecology. Critical thinking on current topics in general primate behavior will be emphasized through various discussion formats. The evolutionary continuum between humans and other primates will be explored. Throughout the course, we will pay attention to conservation threats that menace the well-being of lemur today.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANP 350: Methods in Studying Primates

Introduction to the concepts and practical skills needed to conduct scientific work, particularly in the study of primates, including how to collect and analyze data focusing on habitat description, primate densities, use of space, and social interactions. Topics include design and presentation of research; ecological field methods; behavioral observations and other techniques. Students are required to plan a small research study and to present their proposal in class. Some computer work outside class required.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor/Study Abroad office

3 credits

ANP 360: Primate Conservation

Review of endangered species of primates and case histories of conservation programs in Asia, Africa, South America, and Madagascar, highlighting different problems and solutions.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANP 120 or BIO 201 and BIO 204

DEC:     H
SBC:     STAS

3 credits

ANP 391: Topics in Biological Anthropology

Discussion of a topic of current interest in physical anthropology. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: ANP 120

Advisory prerequisite: One other ANP course

3 credits

ANP 399: Advanced Field Research in the Turkana Basin

Intended to follow the Turkana Basin Institute (TBI) Field School in NW Kenya. It should facilitate TBI field school alumni participation in ongoing field projects directed by senior researchers within the Turkana Basin. Upper-division Stony Brook undergraduates who demonstrate readiness may undertake a junior role within a larger project focusing on archaeology or human ecology (ANT 399) or paleoanthropology or vertebrate paleontology (ANP 399). The nature of ANT/ANP 399 offerings each semester will depend on which senior scholars are conducting field research and whether their projects are suitable for undergraduate involvement. They may include the opportunity to join a paleoanthropological survey of ancient landscapes for vertebrate remains (ANP 399), or to join an archaeological excavation of a 4000-year-old habitation site (ANT 399). Credit for each offering is determined for by the TBI faculty and is consistent for all registrants.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. One or more of the following courses: ANP 305, ANP 306, ANT 304, ANT 307, GEO 303

3-12 credits

ANP 403: Seminar in Biological Anthropology

Research and discussion of selected topics in physical anthropology. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

ANP 404: Human Osteology

A detailed study of the anatomy of the human skeleton with special emphasis on the interpretation of skeletal remains from archaeological contexts. Consideration is given to the growth, structure, and function of bones, and to forensic aspects such as the determination of age, sex, stature, and pathology from skeletal remains. Students conduct a research project on a human skeleton.

Prerequisites: ANP 300; permission of instructor

3 credits

ANP 405: Human Evolution in the Headlines

Exploration of how anthropologists reconstruct the biology and behavior of extinct human species. The class addresses how anthropologists estimate body size in individual fossils, establish the evolutionary relationships among species, and determine what different species ate when they were alive, among other topics. Topics are approached by reading scientific articles and reading popular accounts of anthropological discoveries and research. Students are encouraged to actively participate in class through presentations and discussion of readings. Emphasis is on developing critical thinking and writing skills. The goals of this class are multifaceted and include learning modern techniques for reconstructing the behavior, systematics, and biology of extinct humans, and discerning between facts, analysis, and interpretation in science. Note: students who have taken ANP 403 with this topic may not take ANP 405 for credit.

Prerequisite: ANP 120 or ANP 201

3 credits

ANP 406: Pseudoscience and Anthropology

Course will examine some common misconceptions, as well as deliberate frauds, related to the field of Anthropology. Bigfoot, Atlantis, and ancient astronauts remain common subjects in mainstream media, but what do we, and what can we, really know about such subjects? In this course we will assemble a basic toolkit for skeptical inquiry, and apply it to several examples of anthropological pseudoscience. Dissecting these cases leads to an investigation of how we can distinguish truth from falsehood, and knowable facts from unknowable conjectures. Lastly, we will try to understand the persistence of pseudoscience and other forms of nonsense in our culture, as these clearly thrive despite their lack of grounding in reality.

Prerequisite: ANT 104, ANP 120, and either ANP 201 or ANP 220

3 credits

ANP 447: Readings in Biological Anthropology

Individual advanced readings on selected topics in physical anthropology. May be repeated up to a limit of 6 credits.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

3 credits

ANP 475: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; anthropology major; 3.00 g.p.a.; permission of instructor

3 credits, S/U grading

ANP 476: Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. Students assume greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and analyzing results of tests that have already been graded. The course in which the student is permitted to work as a teaching assistant must be different from the course in which he or she previously served. Not for major or minor credit.

Prerequisites: U3 or U4 standing; anthropology major; 3.00 g.p.a.; permission of instructor

3 credits, S/U grading

ANP 487: Independent Research in Biological Anthropology

Independent research projects carried out by upper-division students. The student must propose the research project, carry it out, analyze the data, and submit the results in a written form acceptable to the sponsor. May be repeated up to a limit of six credits.

Prerequisite: 15 credits in anthropology; permission of instructor

0-6 credits

ANP 488: Internship in Biological Anthropology

Participation in state, local, and national public and private agencies and organizations. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final written report on their experiences to the faculty sponsor and the department. May be repeated to a limit of 12 credits.

Prerequisites: 15 credits in anthropology; permission of instructor

0-6 credits, S/U grading

ANP 495: Senior Honors Project in Anthropology

First course of a two-semester project for anthropology majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. Arranged in consultation with the department through the director of undergraduate studies, the project involves independent readings or research and the writing of a paper under the close supervision of an appropriate faculty member on a suitable topic selected by the student. Students enrolled in ANP 495 are obliged to complete ANP 496 the following semester. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence ANP 495-496.

Prerequisite: Admission to the anthropology honors program

3 credits

ANP 496: Senior Honors Project in Anthropology

Second course of a two-semester project for anthropology majors who are candidates for the degree with honors. Arranged in consultation with the department through the director of undergraduate studies, the project involves independent readings or research and the writing of a paper under the close supervision of an appropriate faculty member on a suitable topic selected by the student. Students receive only one grade upon completion of the sequence ANP 495-496.

Prerequisite: ANP 495; admission to the anthropology honors program

3 credits