Integrity

Committees on Academic Standing and Appeals (CASA)

Undergraduate students with a declared major or area of interest in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences (CEAS) should make requests in matters outlined below to the Committee on Academic Standing and Appeals of CEAS. CEAS programs include applied mathematics and statistics, biomedical engineering, chemical and molecular engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, engineering science, information systems, mechanical engineering, and technological systems management. See also the entry Petitioning for Exceptions below.

All other students, including those who have not declared a major (indicated by GEN on the student’s record), and those who have declared an area of interest (e.g., pre-business GBS, pre-nursing GNS, excluding those with an area of interest in a CEAS program) should make requests in matters outlined below to the Committee on Academic Standing and Appeals of the College of Arts and Sciences. See also the entry Petitioning for Exceptions below.

Both committees operate under faculty legislation and consider exceptions to regulations pertaining to such matters as registration changes, course loads, and academic standing. The CEAS committee also deals with academic dishonesty and academic grievances. Note: Not all exceptions to regulations or deadlines are petitionable. Changing to or from the G/P/NC option after the deadline published in the academic calendar is not petitionable.

In exceptional circumstances, students may petition the appropriate Committee on Academic Standing and Appeals for permission to withdraw from a course after normal deadlines. Students who obtain permission to add or drop courses after the normal deadlines will be charged $20 for each program change form processed by the Registrar. Students who, because of extraordinary situations beyond their control, are granted permission to withdraw from all courses and who will not be in attendance during the semester are not charged a fee.

The Committee on Academic Standing and Appeals of the appropriate college considers all petitions for reinstatement in cases of academic suspension. (See the section Academic Standing, Support, and Retention) Students who are granted reinstatement will be assessed a $50 processing fee.

Petitioning for Exceptions

Students are responsible for reviewing, understanding, and abiding by the University’s regulations, procedures, requirements, and deadlines as described in official publications including this Undergraduate Bulletin, the Student Handbook, and online class schedules.

Occasionally extraordinary circumstances necessitate that a student request an exception to an academic regulation or deadline. These may include exceptions to registration processing dates and exceptions to regulations on academic standing. Students must file a petition with the appropriate Committee on Academic Standing and Appeals. See the entry Committees on Academic Standing and Appeals (CASA) above. Note that changing to or from the P/NC option after the deadline published in the academic calendar is not petitionable.

Most petitions for exceptions must be accompanied by documentation demonstrating why the student was unable to comply with the regulation or deadline for which the student is requesting an exception. Ignorance of deadlines or regulations is insufficient cause to grant an exception.

Students with majors in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences may obtain written information about academic regulations, guidelines, and procedures from the Engineering and Applied Sciences Undergraduate Student Office, where petitions are filed. All other students should consult the Academic and Transfer Advising Services Center or, for EOP/AIM students, the Office of Special Programs, and file petitions with the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs.

Academic Integrity

Each student must pursue his or her academic goals honestly and be personally accountable for all submitted work. Representing another person’s work as your own is always wrong. Academic dishonesty can range from simple breach of class or University guidelines, such as using a cell phone in an exam, to very serious cases which may result in expulsion. The Academic Judiciary Committee for the College of Arts and Sciences (which also includes classes taught by the College of Business, the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, and the School of Journalism) and the Committee on Academic Standing and Appeals of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences are responsible for enforcing the guidelines for academic integrity in each college, and for the consideration of individual cases. Any suspected instance of academic dishonesty will be reported to the appropriate committee. The judiciary committee of each college has jurisdiction over all courses offered in that college. Either committee may inform pre-professional committees about any findings of academic dishonesty which, in its judgment, are of sufficient seriousness. It is the responsibility of all students to make themselves familiar with the University’s policies and procedures regarding academic integrity as well as any additional guidelines issued by instructors for specific classes. For more comprehensive information on academic integrity, including categories of academic dishonesty, please refer to the academic judiciary Web site at http://www.stonybrook.edu/uaa/academicjudiciary/

All students found guilty of academic dishonesty are required to take the University’s course on academic integrity (the “Q Course”) and additional penalties including suspension or expulsion may also be levied. Information about the procedures for hearings and other functions of these committees dealing with academic integrity is available on the Web site referenced above, as well as in the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs and in the Engineering and Applied Sciences Undergraduate Student Office.

Students who have been found guilty of academic dishonesty and, as a consequence, have been assigned a Q grade may not graduate with University honors. Requests for exceptions to this policy for students with majors in the College of Arts and Sciences, School of Business, School of Journalism, the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, and students enrolled in Sustainability programs are reviewed by the University’s Academic Integrity Officer. No exceptions will be made for students graduating with majors in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Scholarly and Scientific Misconduct

While most cases of academic dishonesty fall under the jurisdiction of the judiciary committees, students involved in allegations of scholarly or scientific misconduct as defined below are subject to the campus policy and procedure for investigating such allegations as filed in compliance with the requirements of the Public Health Service’s Office of Research Integrity.

Scholarly and scientific misconduct are defined as: fabrication, falsification, plagiarism, or other serious deviation from accepted practices in proposing, carrying out, or reporting results of scholarly activities; and retaliation of any kind against a person who reported or provided information about suspected or alleged misconduct and who has not acted in bad faith. This definition is not meant to include actions involving honest error or honest differences in interpretations or judgments of data.

Academic Grievances

The Academic Judiciary Committee for the College of Arts and Sciences and the Committee on Academic Standing and Appeals in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences consider students’ complaints of arbitrary, capricious, malicious, or otherwise improper actions related to grading and other evaluations, assignments, examinations, other requirements for credit, and any other academic matters. While such grievances are most often brought by students against instructors, the committees consider grievances involving any member of the academic community on the West Campus. The committees, however, cannot intervene in matters covered by the procedures set forth in the Policies of the Board of Trustees, the Rules for the Maintenance of Public Order, or the collective bargaining agreements between New York State and United University Professions (the faculty-staff union) or GSEU (the Graduate Student Employees Union).

The committees consider only charges of clearly improper academic practices; they will not intervene in disagreements about an instructor’s intellectual judgment (e.g., grading). Grievances should be brought to a committee only after students or others have unsuccessfully pursued other avenues of redress, such as discussion with the instructor and department chairperson. Grievances should be put in writing, including all pertinent details, and should be submitted to the appropriate committee within one month of the alleged impropriety. Further information about academic grievance procedures may be obtained from the Academic Judiciary Web site at http://www.stonybrook.edu/uaa/academicjudiciary/ as well as from the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs or the Engineering and Applied Sciences Undergraduate Student Office.

For more information on responsibilities and integrity, see the section Office of University Community Standards.