AAS: Asian & Asian American Studies

AAS 501: Proseminar: Topics & Methods in Contemporary Asian and Asian American Studies

This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative research methods commonly used in social sciences and humanities, including narrative research, phenomenological research, ethnographic research, case study research, correlational research, and survey research. Students are expected to identify a topic of interest of their own choosing within Contemporary Asian and Asian American Students and develop a pilot research project. The instructor plays the role of a facilitator by leading methodological as well as thematic discussions on research topics initiated by students. This course takes the formats of lectures, workshops, student presentations, peer critique, and one-on-one instructor-student conferences.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

AAS 560: Empire, Memory and Narratives of Asian America

Asian American literary scholars have focused on the tropes of immigration and settlement as major paradigms for mapping the landscape of Asian American writing. The late 1990s, however, witnessed the emergence of novels , memoirs, narrative and experimental films the departed from current notions of Asian American literature and films. A distinct cohort of writers and filmmakers, who are first-generation immigrants, created cultural forms that focus on the heimat or the homeland, narrating history, the legacies of war, violence, personal and national memory. The seminar considers how these fictional and non-fictional narratives engage with new aesthetic and political questions regarding Asian American writing, filmmaking and the limits and the possibilities of memory in the digital age.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

AAS 571: Islamic Thought in Asia

Islam is commonly considered a Middle-Eastern religion, but most of the Middle East lies within the Asian continent, and the vast majority of Muslims over the centuries have been non-Arabic speakers, living across south and central Asia into India, China, and Indonesia. We will survey the importance of Island as the todays� largest Asian religion (numerically speaking) and look at some of the distinctive features of its local variants. We will pay special attention to the manner in which teachings were presented in the languages besides Arabic that became Islam�s vehicles, in particular Chines, which witnessed a remarkable synthesis of the Islamic and Confucian worldviews.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

AAS 575: Multilingualism & Communication in Asia

Survey of multilingualism as a cognitive phenomenon and communication strategy with special reference to traditionally multilingual societies. Structural, sociolinguistic, cultural, and cognitive models are evaluated for their adequacy in representing multilingualism in Western and especially non-Western (Asian and African cultures. Topics include concepts of multilingualism, typology of multilingualism; functional distribution of languages in education, media, social media, and business; diglossia, code-switching and code-mixing, psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic models of multiple language representation and processing in the brain; synchronic and diachronic dimensions of language contact and interaction in the individual and society: accents, interference, transfer on various linguistic levels; borrowing, linguistic convergence, emergence of pidgins, creoles, mixed languages, styles, and non-native varieties; multilingualism as a pragmatic and stylistic literary device speech acts and multilingual creativity; socio-political dimensions of multilingualism: multilingualism and identity; accommodation and assimilation; language maintenance and shift; language rivalry and conflict; spread of languages of wider communication and minority languages� anxiety about hegemony and endangerment; cross-cultural case students of pluralistic models of synergistic co-existence.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)