Requirements for the M.S. Degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering

Admission to the MS program in Computer Engineering requires the student to have completed a Bachelor degree in Computer Engineering or Computer Science. Students with a Bachelor degree in Electrical Engineering could also be admitted if they have taken or will take the following courses or their equivalent:

ESE 345 Computer Architecture;

ESE 380 Embedded Microprocessor Systems Design I;

ESE 333 Real-Time Operating Systems.

A candidate for the master’s degree may petition to transfer a maximum of 12 graduate credits from another institution towards the master’s degree requirements. Students transferring from non-matriculated status are also limited to a maximum of 12 credits for the master’s degree.

I. Non-Thesis Option

1. At least 30 graduate credits with a cumulative and departmental grade point average of 3.0 or better. Among these 30 credits, up to six credits may be ESE 597, ESE 599, or ESE 698. Only 3 credits of ESE 698 may be used. Any non-ESE course will need prior approval given by the Graduate Program Director before a student can register.

2. At least one (1) course from each of the following sub-areas:

Hardware:         ESE/CSE 536 Switching and Routing in Parallel and Distributed Systems,
                        ESE 545 Computer Architecture,
                        ESE 565 Parallel Processing Architectures,
                        ESE 566 Hardware-Software Co-Design of Embedded Systems,
                        ESE 580 Microprocessor-Based Systems I,
                        ESE 581 Microprocessor-Based Systems II.

Networking:       ESE 505 Wireless Network,
                        ESE 506 Wireless Networking and Mobile Computing,
                        ESE 546 Computer Communication Networks,
                        ESE 548 Local & Wide Area Networks,
                        ESE 550 Network Management and Planning.

CAD and VLSI:   ESE 530 Computer Aided Design,
                         ESE 549 Advanced VLSI System Testing,
                         ESE 555 Advanced VLSI Circuit Design,
                         ESE 556 VLSI Physical and Logic Design Automation,
                         ESE 575 Advanced VLSI Signal Processing Architecture.

Theory:             ESE 554 Computational Models for Computer Engineers,
                        CSE 548/AMS 542 Analysis of Algorithms.

Software:          ESE 568 Computer and Robot Vision,
                        ESE 588 Pattern Recognition,
                        CSE 504 Compiler Design,
                        CSE 506 Operating Systems,
                        CSE 526 Principles of Programming Languages,
                        CSE 533 Network Programming,
                        CSE 548/AMS 542 Analysis of Algorithms.

3. At least three (3) additional regular lecture based courses. ESE 597, ESE 599, ESE 697, ESE 698 and ESE 699 are not counted as regular courses. Topics course, ESE 670, can be counted only once as a regular course.

4. At least one (maximum three) credit of ESE 597. Graduate Program Director approval is required (see graduate student guide for details). In exceptional circumstances, the Graduate Program Director can approve a replacement of ESE 597 credit by ESE 599, ESE 699 or ESE 698 one.

II. Thesis Option

1. Students must inform the department in writing at the end of their first semester if they would like to choose the M.S. Thesis Option.

2. At least 30 graduate credits with a cumulative and departmental grade point average of 3.0 or better. Among these 30 credits, at least six credits of ESE 599, with a maximum of 12 credits total being taken from ESE 599, ESE 597, or ESE 698. Only three credits of 698 can be used. Any non-ESE course will need prior approval given by the Graduate Program Director before a student can register.

3. At least one (1) course from each of the following sub-areas:

Hardware:         ESE/CSE 536 Switching and Routing in Parallel and Distributed Systems,
                        ESE 545 Computer Architecture,
                        ESE 565 Parallel Processing Architectures,
                        ESE 566 Hardware-Software Co-Design of Embedded Systems,
                        ESE 580 Microprocessor-Based Systems I,
                        ESE 581 Microprocessor-Based Systems II.

Networking:       ESE 505 Wireless Network,
                        ESE 506 Wireless Networking and Mobile Computing,
                        ESE 546 Computer Communication Networks,
                        ESE 548 Local & Wide Area Networks,
                        ESE 550 Network Management and Planning.

CAD and VLSI:   ESE 530 Computer Aided Design,
                         ESE 549 Advanced VLSI System Testing,
                         ESE 555 Advanced VLSI Circuit Design,
                         ESE 556 VLSI Physical and Logic Design Automation,
                         ESE 575 Advanced VLSI Signal Processing Architecture.

Theory:             ESE 554 Computational Models for Computer Engineers,
                        CSE 548/AMS 542 Analysis of Algorithms.

Software:          ESE 568 Computer and Robot Vision,
                        ESE 588 Pattern Recognition,
                        CSE 504 Compiler Design,
                        CSE 506 Operating Systems,
                        CSE 526 Principles of Programming Languages,
                        CSE 533 Network Programming,
                        CSE 548/AMS 542 Analysis of Algorithms.

4. At least one (1) additional regular lecture based course. ESE 597, ESE 599, ESE 697, ESE 698 and ESE 699 are not counted as regular courses. Topics course, ESE 670, can be counted only once as a regular course.

5. At least one (maximum three) credit of ESE 597. Graduate Program Director approval is required (see graduate student guide for details). In exceptional circumstances, the Graduate Program Director can approve a replacement of ESE 597 credit by ESE 599, ESE 699 or ESE 698 one.

6. Students must satisfactorily complete a thesis (see graduate student guide for details).

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree in Computer Engineering

A. Major and minor area requirements

1. Major area requirement is satisfied by taking minimum of three (3) courses from a selected major area with minimum GPA of 3.5. See Graduate Student Guide for preapproved lists of courses for each area.

2. Minor area requirement is satisfied by taking courses from other areas (different from the selected major area) with minimum GPA of 3.0. Students with BS degree (G3) are required to take two (2) courses from other areas while students with MS degree (G4) are required to take one (1) course.

B. Course Requirements

1. A minimum of six (6) regular courses beyond the MS degree or 14 regular courses beyond the BS degree (including courses taken to satisfy major and minor requirements). The choice must have the prior approval of the designated faculty academic advisor. Any non-ESE course will need prior approval given by the Graduate Program Director before a student can register.

2. ESE 697 Practicum in Teaching (3 credits) is required to satisfy the teaching requirement. Students must be G-5 status in order to take this course, i.e. be advanced to candidacy.

3. The courses ESE 597, ESE 598, ESE 599, ESE 698, and ESE 699 are not counted as regular courses.

4. Courses presented under the title ESE 670 Topics in Electrical Sciences that have different subject matters, and are offered as formal lecture courses, are considered different regular courses but may not be counted more than twice.

C. Advancement to Candidacy

After successfully completing all major/minor/course requirements (except ESE 697) the student is eligible to be recommended for advancement to candidacy. This status is conferred by the dean of the Graduate School upon recommendation from the chairperson of the department. Departmental policy requires that all G3 classified doctoral students Advance to Candidacy within 2.5 years from his/her academic start at Stony Brook University.  All G4 classified doctoral students are required to Advance to Candidacy within 1.5 years from his/her academic start.

D. Preliminary Examination

A student must pass the preliminary examination not more than 1.5 year after advancement to candidacy. Both a thesis topic and the thesis background area are emphasized. Students must pass the Preliminary Examination at least ONE year prior to their Defense. See Graduate Student Guide for details.

E. Dissertation

The most important requirement for the Ph.D. degree is the completion of a dissertation, which must be an original scholarly investigation. The dissertation must represent a significant contribution to the scientific and engineering literature, and its quality must be compatible with the publication standards of appropriate and reputable scholarly journals.

F. Approval and Defense of Dissertation

The dissertation must be orally defended before a dissertation examination committee, and the candidate must obtain approval of the dissertation from this committee. The committee must have a minimum of four members (at least three of whom are faculty members from the department), including the research advisor, at least one person from outside the department, and a committee chair. (Neither the research advisor nor the outside member may serve as the chair). On the basis of the recommendation of this committee, the dean of engineering and applied sciences will recommend acceptance or rejection of the dissertation to the dean of the Graduate School. All requirements for the degree will have been satisfied upon the successful defense of the dissertation.

G. Residency Requirement

The student must complete two consecutive semesters of full-time graduate study. Full-time study is 12 credits per semester until 24 graduate credits have been earned. After 24 graduate credits have been earned, the student may take only nine credits per semester for fulltime status.

H. Time Limit

All requirements for the Ph.D. degree must be completed within seven (7) years after completing 24 credits of graduate courses in the department.

Certificates

1. Networking & Wireless Communications Certificate

Matriculated students only.

Networking and wireless communications are key technologies in today’s technological world.  Networks such as the Internet as well as telephone, cable and wireless networks serve to interconnect people and computers in a ubiquitous and cost effective way.  The area of wireless communications in particular has grown rapidly in recent years and has utilized networking technology to be successful.  There is a large industrial base involving networking and wireless communications in terms of equipment and software providers, service providers and end users.  Moreover this technology has made the average consumer’s life more productive, flexible and enjoyable.

The Stony Brook Certificate Program in Networking and Wireless Communications is designed to give matriculated students validated graduate level instruction in this area of much recent interest. The program can be completed in a reasonable amount of time as it involves only four courses. These are regular Stony Brook graduate level courses taught by Stony Brook faculty. The SUNY approved certificate program can be tailored to the needs of the individual student. Courses used for the certificate program can also be used toward the MS or PhD degree by matriculated students.

Important Note: Admission to the certificate program is limited to students enrolled in either the MS or PhD programs in the Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering. Students may receive the certificate if they have no more than 12 graduate credits in the department as of the start of Fall 2017.

To receive the Stony Brook Certificate in Networking and Wireless Communications, a student must complete FOUR required courses as specified below, with at least a B grade in each course.

At least ONE course from the following:

ESE 505: Wireless Communications
ESE 506: Wireless Networking

At least ONE course from the following:

ESE 532: Theory of Digital Communications
ESE 546: Networking Algorithms and Analysis
ESE 548: Local and Wide Area Networks

In addition to the above, if needed, courses may be selected from:

ESE 503:  Stochastic Systems
ESE 504:  Performance Evaluation of Communication and Computer Systems
ESE 522:  Fiber Optic Systems
ESE 528:  Communication Systems
ESE 531:  Detection and Estimation Theory
ESE 535:  Information Theory and Reliable Communication
ESE 536:  Switching and Routing in Parallel and Distributed Systems
ESE 543:  Mobile Cloud Computing
ESE 544:  Network Security Engineering
ESE 547:  Digital Signal Processing
ESE 550:  Network Management and Planning
ESE 552:  Interconnection Networks

·  Students must request the Certificate from Professor Thomas Robertazzi via Email Thomas.Robertazzi@stonybrook.edu once the program is completed.

2.  The ECE department is in the process of seeking approval for two new certificates:

Engineering Machine Learning Systems: grade B or better for ESE 503, ESE 588, ESE 589, and one elective (ESE 568 or ESE 587 or BMI 511 / ESE 569);

Engineering the Internet of Things: grade B or better for ESE 566, ESE 506, ESE 525, and one elective (ESE 534 or ESE 544). 

These programs are not yet approved (applied for approval in summer 2017) and there is no guarantee that they will be approved. Students will be informed when and if the new certificate programs are approved.

On the assumption that “Engineering Machine Learning Systems” will be approved students can consider taking in Fall 2017 the ESE 503 (Stochastic Systems) and may possibly take as a certificate elective BMI 511/ESE 569 (Translational Bioinformatics).

Course offering for “Engineering the Internet of Things” will begin at the earliest in Spring 2018.