PSY: Psychology

PSY 501: Analysis of Variance and Experimental Design

The design and analysis of factorial experiments having a single dependent variable. Topics include between- and within-subjects designs, mixed-factor designs, interactions, trend analysis, and planned comparisons. Emphasis on applications in psychological research. Required of all Ph.D. students in psychology. Prerequisite: Undergraduate statistics, Co-requisite: PSY 508

Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 502: Correlation and Regression

Correlation, regression, multiple correlation, multiple regression, partial correlation, and introductions to some of the following topics: factor analysis, mediational analysis, structural equation modeling, relation of regression to analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, discriminant function analysis, and multivariate analysis of variance. Required of all Ph.D. students in psychology. Spring

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 504: First Year Seminar

This course includes discussion of current research and research practices by faculty and visiting speakers. This course is required of all first-year Ph.D. students and Masters students. 0-3 credits, S/U grading May be repeated for credit.

0-3 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 505: Structural Equation Modeling and Advanced Multivariate Methods

Thorough coverage of structural equation modeling and brief coverage of other specialized techniques used in data analysis in psychology, such as multi-level modeling and cluster analysis (topics for brief coverage vary from year to year). The course emphasizes hands-on work with real data sets, using standard statistical software packages.

Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 506: Psychometric Methods

This course surveys traditional and evolving views on item design, reliability, and validity, reviews statistical methods related to test construction, and applies this material to the design and evaluation of observational, rating, and self-report methods in domains of interest to psychologists. The course also examines the impact of test characteristics on data analysis and the role of test design in theory construction.

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 507: Meta-Analysis

This course is an introduction to research synthesis and the use of meta-analytic techniques. The content is intended to be a thorough yet practical coverage of basic principles, with an emphasis on leading students through the steps of conducting their own meta-analytic project. A basic knowledge of statistics commonly used in the social and behavioral sciences is essential. Class meetings will involve both didactic instruction and discussion of readings and homework assignments.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 508: Introduction to Computer Applications in Statistics

Computer protocol and introduction to statistical packages and necessary utility programs. Fall and Spring

0-1 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 510: History of Psychology

Intensive reading in the history of psychology from original sources. Emphasis is on class discussion and relation to modern problems.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 511: Learning

A consideration of the basic principles of learning. Analysis of the leading theories of learning as well as areas of controversy and dispute.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 513: Theories of Attention

This course covers some of the major theoretical perspectives that have shaped the attention literature, staring with historical distinctions of early versus late selection and ending with more contemporary mathematical, neurophysiological, and neuorcomputational theories. Specific questions will include: "What is attention?" (is it a unitary thing or a grab-bag of assorted processes), "How does it work," and "What paradigms have researchers used to study attention?" (dichotic listening, priming, search, etc.).

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 514: Sensation and Perception

This course covers the sensory mechanisms that change physical stimuli (e.g., a picture of your friend) into neural information, the major brain areas involved in processing this sensory information for various perceptual abilities (eg., motion perception, color perception, object perception, etc.), and the different theoretical approaches to analyzing a given perceptual phenomenon.

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 516: Judgment and Decision Making

This course provides an overview of empirical and theoretical work on

judgment and decision making. Topics include what decision making is,

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 518: Memory

Review of theory and phenomena related to human memory. Topics include representation of schemas and categories, encoding, forgetting, implicit learning, and memory for procedures. Several recent models of long-term memory representation are discussed and compared.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 520: Psycholinguistics

The psychology of language, including the mental lexicon, sentence processing, pragmatics, discourse, production and comprehension of utterances in conversation, language and thought, first-language acquisition, and computational approaches.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 524: Cognitive Development

This course presents the developmental perspective as applied to human cognition. Topics include (1) characteristics and constraints on cognitive abilities in infancy, childhood, and adolescence, (2) mechanisms of developmental change, and (3) links between cognitive development and selected applied topics.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 533: Principles Applicable to Clinical Psychology: Historical/systemic perspectives

A critical review of how principles of general psychology apply to clinical psychology. The course material will be discussed within the context of the history of ideas and major systems of thought as they relate to conceptualization, assessment, and intervention.

Prerequisite: Psychology doctoral student.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 534: Assessment: General Principles, Clinical Interviews, and Adult Psychotherapy

General principles of assessment; clinical interviewing; structured interviews for assessing axis-I and axis-II psychopathology; ethics and cultural diversity. Prerequisite: Clinical psychology doctoral student

Fall, 2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 535: Advanced Research Methods

Advanced research methods employed in clinical, personality, social, and behavioral research. Fall or Spring

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 537: Methods of Intervention: Treatment of Internalizing Disorders

This course covers the theory and research associated with the treatment of internalizing disorders of adults, adolescents, and children. Among the topics covered are the treatment of phobias, school refusual, panic disorder, general anxiety disorder, social anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, complicated grief, obsessive compulsive disorder, and mood disorders. In the treatment of each, particular emphasis is placed on how therapy needs to be modified depending on whether one is working with a child, adolescent or adult.

Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 538: Method of Intervention: Treatment of Externalizing Disorders and Relationship Problems

This course focuses on the treatment of externalizing disorders of adults and children as well as intimate partner problems like relationship discord and partner abuse. A developmental focus is taken as exemplified by coverage of child externalizing problems such as Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder, and Attention Deficit Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder and Partner Abuse. Treatments of alcohol abuse and eating disorders in both teens and adults are presented. Finally, treatment of schizophrenia is addressed along with coverage of the course of schizophrenia across the lifespan. Individual, couple, and family treatments are reviewed.

Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 541: Social Psychology of Close Relationships

High level overview of current theory and research on the social psychology of close relationships.

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 542: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors

Study of psychological, behavioral and biological theories of addiction.

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 543: Attachment

This course examines current psychological theories of infant-parent and child parent relationships and adult-adult attachment with special attention to assessment methods, clinical applications and controversy regarding the importance of early experience.

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 544: Emotion & Cognition

This course focuses on fundamental questions regarding the interaction between emotion and cognition, and how such this interaction can be measured. Key topics will include: differentiating emotions from other affective states, understanding the functions of discrete emotions, the role of the consciousness in emotional experience, and whether emotions can be controlled ; additionally, the course will address emotion-cognition interactions in the domains of memory, attention, perception and reasoning/decision-making. We will also address developmental changes and cross-cultural differences in emotion and cognition. The goal of the course is to be able to develop a translational research proposal rooted in basic research on emotion and cognition.

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 545: Psychopathology: Conceptual models and internalizing disorders

Theory and research on abnormal behavior in children, adolescents, and adults. A lifespan development approach is taken, with a focus on classification, conceptualizations and models of psychological disorders, and the phenomenology, epidemiology, course, etiology, pathogenesis, psychopathology, and pathophysiology of internalizing disorders such as mood and anxiety disorders.

Fall, 2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 546: Measurement and Scaling

An historical introduction to the measurement of psychological variables and survey of contemporary scaling methods with an emphasis on psychophysical scaling and experimental applications.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 549: Prejudice and Discrimination

This course will provide an overview of theoretical perspectives, research methods, empirical findings, and practical applications of psychological research on prejudice, stigma, and intergroup relations. Critical thinking about theorizing and research in this area will be emphasized during class discussions and through a course project. Students are admitted with permission by instructor.

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 552: Social and Personality Development

A survey of milestones and processes of social development in infancy and childhood. Relevance to understanding adult personality and social relationships is emphasized.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 555: Social Psychology

An introduction to social psychology, a field of study examining how people feel about, think about, and influence others. Topics include attitudes, motivation, social judgements, and interpersonal behaviors. Coursework focuses on identifying basic principles that transcend particular content domains.

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 556: Stress and Coping

In this course, we examine current issues, challenges, and questions in two related areas of psychology: stress and coping. We will cover classical approaches in addition to recent empirical research and theoretical development. Students are not expected to have prior familiarity with the topic areas. We will begin by reviewing definitions and major theoretical orientations. In subsequent weeks we will concentrate on issues relevant to stress, coping, and related topics such as social support, across a broad range of circumstances, rather than focusing on specific stressful contexts such as chronic illness or bereavement. For example, we will examine ways to define successful and maladaptive coping. We will also consider whether social support is better conceptualized as a commodity or as an individual perception. We will compare contradictory evidence about the benefits of perceived control, and we will discuss problems of generalizing research findings to different ethnic, cultural, and other groups.

Offered: Fall, Spring alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 558: Theories of Social Psychology: Health Applications

This course provides an overview of the ways in which social psychological theories and perspectives can be used to understand thoughts and behavior relevant to health and illness. It covers social influence, social comparison, pluralistic ignorance, social support, cognitive dissonance, message framing, and fear communication. The course also covers links between personality characteristics and health and how broader social and cultural environment affects health and illness.

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 559: Psychology of Women's Health

This course covers a variety of psychologically-important topics in women's health based on current research findings. We address psychological contributors to and consequences of women's health and illness, focusing on diseases that affect women differently or disproportionately than men (including coronary heart disease, cancer, AIDS, and autoimmune diseases), women's reproductive health (including menstruation, contraception, pregnancy, infertility, and menopause), health behaviors (including substance abuse, exercise, and eating), and other topics such as violence against women, women's mental health, and women as health care providers and health researchers.

Co-scheduled with WST 559.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 560: Cognitive Neuroscience

Cognitive neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field, at the interface of systems neuroscience, computational neuroscience, and cognitive psychology. In this course, we examine the current theories and empirical research findings on the neural basis of cognition. We will cover anatomical, neurophysiological and pharmacological correlates of behavioral functions such as perception, attention, motivation, learning, memory, cognitive control, and communication. We will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches used to student the neural substrates of higher-order cognition.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

May be repeated 1 times FOR credit.

PSY 561: Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience I

This course introduces students to neural elements responsible for processing information supporting sensation, perception, cognition and movement. Starting with the philosophy of the mind and the history of neuroscience, the course proceeds with an introduction of cells, neural signaling, transmitters and receptors. How these elemental units are integrated to support emergent properties, usch as object recognition, is illustrated. Coversely, examples of complex behavioral impairments resulting from dysfunction in elemental units illustrated. The course proceed to cover neral metabolism, and its relation to disorders of memory and motor dysfunction. Last, stress and its role in neuropsychological disorders is discussed.

Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 562: Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience II

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience illustrates how cellular circuits support function. Classic experiments demonstrating function fro the use of electrophysiological data, lesions and transmitter manipulations are discussed. Students interested in understanding how individual neurons and neural circuits and integrated regional systems directly support specific behaviors will find this course of interest. A textbook is used for the readings.

Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 563: Neuropsychological Assessment

Classroom discussions of issues in neuropsychological assessment and design of assessment batteries are combined with practical experience in the assessment of clinical populations. Each student is assigned to a supervisor to learn assessment techniques for research and/or clinical practice.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 564: Neuropsychopharmacology

This course covers the mechanisms of transmitters and related drug action in the nervous system. In addition to exploring transmitter/receptor relationships, the course covers the sequence of events initiated by this action. Through understanding of these processes, the course then links drug action to nervous system outcomes such as movement, cognition, pain and mood.

Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 565: Functional Neuroanatomy

Just as a function can be derived from the structure of everyday objects, so too can function be derived from the study of brain architecture and neural connectivity. Accordingly, this course takes a structural approach to the understanding of the nervous system and behavior. To complement a disciplinary focus on cognition, affect and emotions, this course will emphasize the connectivity of higher order brain regions. Students will first be introduced to the global organization of the nervous system and a general framework for information processing. Then sensory and motor pathways will be discussed imn more detail. The course will end with topics such as the neurocircuitry of addiction, emotion, and memory.

Offered

Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 581: Integrative Neuroscience Seminar I

This course includes discussion of current research in Integrative Neuroscience by faculty, students, and visiting scientists. This sequence is required of all students in the Integrative Neuroscience Program.

Fall, 0-3 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 582: Integrative Neuroscience Seminar II

This course includes discussions of current research in Integrative Neuroscience by faculty, students, and visiting scientists. This sequence is required of all students in the Integrative Neuroscience program.

Spring, 0-3 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 583: Cognitive Science Seminar I

This course includes discussions of current research in Cognitive Science by faculty, students, and invited scientists. This sequence is required of all students in the Cognitive Science program.

Fall, 0-3 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 584: Cognitive Science Seminar II

This course includes discussions of current research in Cognitive Science by faculty, students, and invited scientists. This sequence is required of all students in the Cognitive Science program.

Spring, 0-3 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 585: Social and Health Psychology Seminar I

This course includes discussions of current research in Social and Health Psychology by faculty, students, and visiting scientists. This sequence is required of all students in the Social and Health Psychology Program.

Fall, 0-3 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 586: Social and Health Psychology Seminar II

This course includes discussions of current research in Social and Health Psychology by faculty, students, and visiting scientists. This sequence is required of all students in the Social and Health Psychology Program.

Spring, 0-3 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 587: Clinical Psychology Seminar I

This course includes discussions of current research in Clinical Psychology by faculty, students, and visiting scientists.

Fall, 0-3 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 588: Clinical Psychology Seminar II

This course includes discussions of current research in Clinical Psychology by faculty, students, and visiting scientists.

Spring, 0-3 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 594: Psychology of Gender

This class examines how gender affects and is affected by behavior, thoughts, and emotions. We investigate gender differences and similarities across the lifespan and consider various perspectives on the study of gender, including psychobiology, social cognitive theory, social role theory, and cross-cultural research.

Fall or Spring, alternate years, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 595: Human Development

An examination of the biological and psychological development of children and adolescents and its relationship to teaching and curriculum development for diverse learners. The course will focus on special education programs, childhood and adolescent psychiatric disorders, and societal issues.

Offered:

Fall, Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 596: Psychopathology: Externalizing & Psychotic Disorders

Theory and research of abnormal behavior in children, adolescents, and adults. A lifespan development approach is taken, with a focus on the phenomenology, epidemiology, course, etiology, pathogenisis, psychopathology, and pathophysiology of externalizing disorders (e.g., conduct, disorder, personality disorders, substance use disorders) and psychotic disorders.

Prerequisite: Must be Psychology Graduate Student

Spring, 2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 602: Assessment: Personality Testing, Intellectual/Cognitive Testing; and Child Parent Assessment

Self-report and projective measures of personality and psychopathology; targeted assessments and measures; intellectual and cognitive assessment; assessment of children and parents; ethics and cultural diversity.

Spring, 2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

PSY 603: Ethics and Professional Issues

Ethics and professional issues. Required of all first-year clinical students. Prerequisite: Clinical psychology doctoral student

Spring, 2 credits, S/U grading

PSY 604: Intervention Practicum

Exposure of the application of clinical intervention procedures.

Prerequisite: PSY 537 or PSY 538, Must be Psychology Graduate Student

Fall, 2 credits, S/U grading

PSY 605: Advanced Clinical Practicum

Exposure to the application of advanced intervention procedures.

Prerequisite: PSY 604 and Clinical psychology doctoral student

Fall and Spring, 2 credits, S/U grading

PSY 606: Supervised Practice

Clinical Psychology faculty meet with students as a group with follow-up individual recitation sessions to cover topics such as assessment and treatment conceptualization of specific cases that students are seeing in Psychological Center. In addition, methods of providing documentation of change in individual cases are discussed as well as means of obtaining corroborating evidence to support self-reported information. Students present case material to the group and receive peer and faculty feedback about case conceptualization and treatment.

Prerequisite: Clinical psychology doctoral student

Summer, 3 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 608: Clinical Psychology Internship

Qualified clinical students carry out supervised clinical responsibilities in settings approved by the faculty.

Prerequisite:Clinical psychology doctoral student

Fall and Spring, 1 credit, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 610: Seminars in Selected Topics

Topics selected on the basis of the needs of the graduate program and research interests of the staff. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Fall, 0-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 620: Seminars in Selected Topics

Topics selected on the basis of the needs of the graduate program and research interests of the staff.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Spring, 0-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 621: Seminar in Teaching Methods

Theory and pragmatics of good college teaching. Topics include lecturing, use of discussion, types of evaluation of students and teachers, factors affecting undergraduate learning, ethics, student-faculty relations, course administration, and audio-visual devices.

Prerequisites: Matriculated psychology graduate student; permission of instructor

Fall or Spring, 0-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 695: Graduate Academic and Professional Skills Practicum

Students enrolled in the M.A. program in Psychology may gain degree-relevant practical experience under the supervision of the program advisor. This experience may include participation in public and private agencies and organizations and experience in teaching support roles. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final written report on their experience to the faculty sponsor and department.

Offered

Fall, Spring, and Summer, 1-6 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 696: Readings

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

1-12 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 698: Research

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

1-12 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 699: Dissertation Research on Campus

Dissertation research under direction of advisor.

Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research must take place on SBU campus, at Cold Spring Harbor, or at the Brookhaven National Lab.

Fall, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 700: Dissertation Research off Campus - Domestic

Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.

Fall, Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 701: Dissertation Research off Campus - International

Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver be second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable.

All international students must received clearance from an International Advisor.

Fall, Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 800: Full Time Summer Research

0 credits, S/ grading

S/U grading

May be repeated for credit.

PSY 820: Summer Teaching-CED