Browsing: Research

This is the premise for a study in the Journal of Business and Psychology by Lily Cushenbery, an assistant professor of management in Stony Brook’s College of Business, and psychologist Samuel Hunter, an associate professor at Penn State. The article received a 2015 Editor Commendation from the journal and has been getting much media attention. The two researchers were interviewed in Fortune magazine. For the study, Cushenbery and Hunter watched a group of nearly 500 people with different personalities work together on developing business ideas such as marketing campaigns and strategies. They found that the jerks didn’t have more creative…

Stony Brook University Physics Dmitri Kharzeev, in collaboration with a team of scientists at the U.S Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, has discovered a new way to generate very low-resistance electric current in a new class of materials. The discovery, which relies on the separation of right- and left-“handed” particles, points to a range of potential applications in energy, quantum computing, and medical imaging, and possibly even a new mechanism for inducing superconductivity–the ability of some materials to carry current with no energy loss. The material the scientists worked with, zirconium pentatelluride, has a surprising trait: When placed…

Using  bundled strands of DNA to build Tinkertoy-like tetrahedral cages, scientists have devised a way to trap and arrange nanoparticles in a way that mimics the crystalline structure of diamond. The achievement of this complex yet elegant arrangement, as described in a paper published in Science, may open a path to new materials that take advantage of the optical and mechanical properties of this crystalline structure for applications such as optical transistors, color-changing materials, and lightweight yet tough materials. Huilin Li, PhD, a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology at Stony Brook University, is part of the…

Certain proteins known to be associated with aging and age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and cancer, are also at a high risk for destabilization caused by oxidation. This finding by a team of researchers at the Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology at Stony Brook University provides an understanding of how oxidative damage, which is a natural process in aging cells, affects proteins. It could also prove to be a foundation to a better understanding of age-related diseases. The paper, titled “Highly charged proteins: the Achilles’ heel of aging proteoms,” is published in the journal Structure. When people…

Stony Brook University established the National Security Institute (NSI) in September 2014. NSI’s goal is to become a world leader in research and security technology, education, business and policy, and raising awareness. NSI spans multiple disciplines and establishes public-private partnerships to develop new holistic socio-technological solutions for securing the world’s highly digital societies. It also engages in the education of professionals in defense, national and cybersecurity, assurance, healthcare and policy. A comprehensive assurance education program trains not only Stony Brook students but also the broader corporate and academic community. NSI’s team of experts has helped launch successful security-centric technology startups.…

Stony Brook University researcher Lilianne Mujica-Parodi has an unusual way of measuring stress: She asks volunteers to jump out of an airplane. In her conversation with “Science on Tap” host and former 60 Minutes producer Steven Reiner, Dr. Mujica-Parodi explains why the emotional stress experienced by novice skydivers helps her understand how the brain’s internal chatter regulates our response to scary situations.  This research lets her distinguish between true bravery and foolish recklessness. Mujica-Parodi, an associate professor in SBU’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, is director of the Laboratory for Computational Neurodiagnostics. Her current research leverages brain scanning technology to investigate the brain’s internal conversations and…

Stony Brook University alumni Yufei Ren has been selected the winner of the 2015 Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC) Distinguished Dissertation Award, which is given each year to a doctoral dissertation that exemplifies scientific significance, impact and originality. He was chosen from among 15 phenomenal dissertations from institutions worldwide. Ren earned his PhD from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and is a member of the Institute of Advanced Computational Science at Stony Brook. Ren’s thesis advisor Dantong Yu nominated his dissertation, Scalable End-to-End Data I/O over Enterprise and Data-Center Networks, for the SPEC honor. Ren’s thesis committee also…

There are about one million bacteria, thousands of species and untold genetic diversity in just one drop of seawater. This amazing fact and the powerful roles played by marine microbes in shaping the health of the ocean’s ecosystem and our climate has led Gordon T. Taylor, a Professor of Oceanography at Stony Brook University’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), to focus his research on uncovering the wonders of marine microbial life. Now, a new $800,000 grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation will enable Professor Taylor and colleagues to develop new microscopy-based technologies to probe this environment…

Stony Brook University has been designated as the Long Island Regional Technology Development Center (RTDC) in the recently completed Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) competition, managed by NYSTAR, the Division of Science, Technology and Innovation of the Empire State Development Corporation. Pending execution of a contract with NYSTAR, commencement of operations is expected in February/March, 2016. The award is $950,000 per year for five years; the total annual budget is expected to be $1.27M including the $320,000 annual Stony Brook match. The initial contract will be for a five-year period, renewable for an additional five years as NYSTAR’s federal contract for the…

Last year, two Stony Brook faculty members joined forces to transform how experts around the world study communication and autism. Now with two major meetings under their belts, projects are underway and progress is in sight. Mark Aronoff, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Linguistics, and Matthew Lerner, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry and Pediatrics and Director of Stony Brook’s Social Competence and Treatment Lab, were the principal organizers of the second meeting of the Consortium on Autism and Sign Language (CASL), sponsored principally by the Exploratory Fund of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and hosted by the American Academy…

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