Health Sciences Bulletin

School of Health and Technology Management

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    HAD 210 - Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Sciences

    Defines basic clinical laboratory sciences terminology and application. Introduces the specialties within the clinical laboratory sciences profession including microbiology, hematology, chemistry, immunohematology, and immunology and their roles in patient care. Reviews professional organizations and licensures. Examines employment opportunities. Visitation of clinical laboratories included. This course is not eligible for the G/P/NC option. Open to west campus students.

    1 credit

    HAD 302 - Fundamental Concepts in Forensic Science

    Introduces specialties within the broad definition of forensic science including criminalistics, crime scene analysis, physical evidence, instrumentation, drug analysis, and biological sciences. Explores up-to-date technologies utilized in crime laboratories to apprehend criminals and to exonerate the innocent. Includes DNA testing, the DNA national database (CODIS), finger print data bank (AFIS), the fired bullet data bank (IBIS), trace evidence techniques, and high-tech advances in crime scene investigation. Not to be taken for credit if completed HAD 304.This course is not eligible for the G/P/NC option. Open to west campus students.

    3 credits

    HAD 304 - Introd to Forensic Science

    Introduces the student to forensic science. Describes the interesting and diverse disciplines that comprise the field. Addresses the value of all physical evidence to criminal and civil investigations. Emphasizes forensic biology and chemistry, and the role of the forensic laboratory in the process of criminal investigation. This course is not eligible for the G/P/NC option. Open to west campus students.

    1 credit

    HAD 313 - Clinical Biochemistry I

    Examines the physiological, biochemical and mathematical relationships involved in the establishment and utilization of laboratory procedures in the clinical chemistry laboratory. Includes, principles of routine clinical chemistry analytical methods of analysis and the clinical significance of routine clinical chemistry analytes. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.3.5 credits

    HAD 315 - Hematology I

    A comprehensive study of the human hematopoietic system and its relationship to other organ systems. Includes morphological identification and biochemical relationships of erythropoiesis and leukopoiesis in healthy vs. disease states. Includes principles and applications of current methods in hematologic analysis, techniques and technology. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.4 credits

    HAD 316 - General Microbiology

    Presents the biology of eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms with special consideration to the microbial form, structure, function, physiology, metabolism, growth and genetics of bacteria, parasites, fungus and viruses. Introduces the world of microbiology with a human perspective providing a solid foundation in health related aspect of microbiology. Prerequisites: BIO 202, CHEM 132 Open to Non HSC students. This course is not eligible for the G/P/NC option. Open to west campus students.

    3 credits

    HAD 324 - Pathology

    Offers a comprehensive overview of human pathology and emphasizes the mechanisms of disease and diagnostic medicine. Provides two major categories: Part I introduces general pathology including the study of basic pathology processes that underlie all disease such as cellular pathology, inflammation, infection, immunology and neoplasia. Part II examines the pathology of major organ systems, and review of diagnostic tools. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program (HHCZB students only)

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program (HHCZB students only)3 credits

    HAD 330 - Foundations in Phlebotomy

    Introduces the student to the theory, principles and procedures of blood collection. Course is divided into a didactic portion for theory and principles of blood collection and a laboratory portion for blood collection procedures and techniques. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program1.5 credits

    HAD 331 - Introduction to Biochemistry for CLS

    Introduces biochemistry including all aspects of metabolism and the synthesis, structure and function of DNA, RNA and protein. Emphasizes the medical and clinical significance of these aspects of biochemistry. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program3 credits

    HAD 335 - Medical Ethics in Health Care for CLS

    Introduces health care professional students in clinical laboratory sciences to basic concepts and challenges in medical ethics. Provides overview of the ethics of health care in a rapidly changing society Approaches ethical dilemmas using theoretical frameworks and decision making processes. Explores ethical issues surrounding health care changes and public health policy. Includes distribution of resources and rationing of services.Includes varied topics such as euthanasia, reproduction, transplants, cloning and genetics from ethical perspectives. Reviews classic cases in health care ethics and their impact on health policy. Discusses professional code of ethics and standards. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program1 credit

    HAD 340 - Foundations in Clinical Laboratory Sciences

    Introduces the student to important issues in clinical laboratory sciences. Addresses personal and professional developments facing the clinical laboratory scientist. Includes the performance of basic laboratory techniques. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.1.5 credits, S/F graded

    HAD 350 - Systems Physiology

    Introduces the basic foundation of human integrative/systems physiology. Includes exposure to physiological control systems, while covering in detail each organ system. These will include membrane, muscle, central nervous system, sensory, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, and endocrine physiology. The course utilizes didactic lecture material, the discussion of pathophysiology, and completion case study examples. The ultimate aim of the course is to solidify the structure and function of the human body under normal conditions and in response to disease states. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program (HHCZB students only).

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program (HHCZB students only).4 credits

    HAD 351 - Research Literacy and Design

    Provides necessary tools for students to evaluate research as well as to initiate and complete appropriate quantitative research methods. Main objective is to help students write a research proposal to prepare them to test their own research hypothesis. Provides basic skills to enhance interpretation, evaluation and analysis of research articles, including hypothesis, literature review, design, methodology and date analysis. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.1 credit

    HAD 363 - Computer Applications in Clinical Laboratory Sciences

    Introduces various computer hardware systems and software applications used in both business and clinical laboratory settings. Includes utilization and multiple functions of computers in the clinical laboratory. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program2 credits

    HAD 380 - Clinical and Medical Microbiology I

    Lectures cover the medical aspects of disease-causing bacteria, including the nature and epidemiology of infectious diseases and the role of microorganisms in health and disease. Emphasizes the related theory of microbiological procedures such as collection of specimens, staining techniques, culturing methods, biochemical basis of media and reagent tests, identification of commonly cultured bacteria, and antimicrobials used in clinical microbiology. Simulated clinical laboratory includes practical experience in the isolation, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of microorganisms commonly encountered. Includes morphologic, biochemical and serologic clinical laboratory techniques using microorganisms involved in human disease.Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.4 credits

    HAD 381 - Clinical and Medical Microbiology II

    Covers the classification, identification, and pathology of disease-causing bacteria. Emphasizes the related theory and performance of microbiological procedures such as collection of specimens, staining techniques, culturing methods, identification of commonly cultured bacteria, and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 380

    4 credits

    HAD 390 - Independent Study in Diagnostic Technologies

    Proposals for special projects involving advanced readings, reports and discussions, or research on selected topics must be submitted to the program director for approval prior to registration for this course. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program1-6 credits

    HAD 397 - Clinical Microbiology Practicum

    Full-time instruction and practice of laboratory procedures in clinical microbiology in an approved hospital laboratory for a six-week period. Practice in the proper techniques for processing specimens for the isolation and identification of bacterial, fungal, and parasitic organisms commonly encountered in infectious processes. Instruction and practice in appropriate techniques for antimicrobial susceptibility testing are included. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 425, HAD 380 and HAD 381.

    6 credits

    HAD 398 - Clinical Hematology I Practicum

    Full-time instruction and practice of laboratory procedures in hematology and special hematology in an approved hospital laboratory for a three-week period. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 315.

    3 credits

    HAD 399 - Clinical Continuation

    This course is for clinical laboratory sciences students continuing with clinical.

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HAD 403 - Medical Molecular Biology

    Provides an overview of the structure and function of genes. Includes theory and laboratory practice of diagnostic molecular biology techniques utilized in the clinical laboratory to analyze DNA. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; Department Consent Required

    3 credits

    HAD 406 - Introduction to Clinical Cytogenetics

    Introduces the student to cytogenetic principles utilized in the clinical laboratory. The lecture course is designed to introduce the theories, concepts and techniques applicable to the practice of clinical cytogenetics. Topics include morphology and behavior of human chromosomes, cytogenetic nomenclature, cytogenetic syndromes and cancer cytogenetics. Laboratory techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and various banding techniques are discussed. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; Department Consent Required

    1 credit

    HAD 411 - Clinical Biochemistry II

    A continuation of HAD 313. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 313

    2.5 credits

    HAD 412 - Clinical Biochemistry III

    Covers the clinical significance and analytical methods for special biochemistry analytes including hormones and metabolites, amino acids, trace elements and vitamins, porphyrins, etc. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 313 and HAD 411

    2 credits

    HAD 414 - Coagulation, Urinalysis and Body Fluids

    A comprehensive study of the function and disorders of hemostatis and thrombosis and anticoagulant therapy. Laboratory diagnosis and laboratory applications are presented. Includes the fundamental principals of urine and body fluid analysis with correlation of laboratory methods and practice. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 315 and HAD 398

    4 credits

    HAD 415 - Applied Immunology

    Introduces the applications of clinical immunology in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases and the fundamental working knowledge of basic principles of the human immune system function. Prerequisite: CLS students only.

    Prerequisite(s): CLS students only.3 credits

    HAD 416 - Immunohematology

    Examines basic immunology, the human blood groups and blood group genetics, hemolytic disease of the newborn, transfusion therapy and current blood bank practice. Includes the performance of clinical laboratory techniques that are routinely performed in an immunohematology laboratory and the interpretation of results. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 315

    3.5 credits

    HAD 425 - Parasitology/Mycology

    Encompasses two specialty areas in clinical microbiology, parasitology and mycology. The first part of the course consists of a comprehensive study of parasites of human and related hosts with a special emphasis on those of medical importance. Host parasite relationships and the role of the parasite in pathogenesis are addressed in lecture. Laboratory exercises demonstrate current methods for identification of parasites of medical importance using prepared slides. The second part of the course consists of lecture and laboratory studies of fungi of medical importance.Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.3 credits

    HAD 432 - Pharmacology

    Describes the basic concepts in pharmacology as they relate to the clinical toxicology laboratory. Presents principles and applications of therapeutics in clinical pharmacology. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.1.5 credits

    HAD 440 - Forensic Sciences Clinical

    Full time instruction and practice in a section of the medical examiner's office (e.g., forensic biology, forensic toxicology) to acquire hands-on experience with techniques utilized in the investigation of criminal activities. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 304; Instructor Consent Required

    3-5 credits

    HAD 445 - Selected Topics in Toxicology

    Familiarizes students with basic concepts of pharmacology and toxicology. Covers methods of analysis and interpretation of laboratory data. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 331 and HAD 432; Department Consent Required

    1.5 credits

    HAD 460 - Clinical Laboratory Quality Management

    Introduces students to total quality managed environments and provides tools to affect quality management programs as their careers progress into leadership roles. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program1 credit

    HAD 468 - Laboratory Information Systems Internship

    Familiarizes students with responsibilites of a laboratory information systems (LIS) manager. Provides exposure to various operations involved with developing, maintaining and troubleshooting an LIS in the laboratory and medical informatics setting. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 363; Additional Prerequisite Track Courses Required; Instructor Consent Required.

    1 credit

    HAD 490 - Independent Study/ Clinical Laboratory Sciences

    Proposals for special projects in clinical laboratory sciences involving readings, research, and laboratory problems must be submitted to the program director for approval prior to registration for this course. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; Instructor Consent Required.

    1-6 credits

    HAD 492 - Research Tutorial

    Provides students with an opportunity to apply both skills and knowledge acquired during their studies to formulate and design a research project. Students will then, under faculty mentorship, execute their project using appropriate research methods. They will also be expected to write and present a scientific paper on the completed research. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program.

    2 credits

    HAD 493 - Advanced Seminar in Clinical Laboratory Sciences

    Prepares students for transition to entry-level clinical laboratory scientist employment. Exposes students to information on NY State licensure, and National Board of Certification (BOC) examination preparation, job search strategies including resume writing, and interviewing preparation. National BOC and other published examination review sources will be used as framework for students to practice and develop experience with the dynamics of analysis and synthesis of laboratory produced data from multiple clinical laboratory areas (i.e. chemistry, immunohematology, microbiology, etc.) and professional organizations. Case study methods will be used for didactic content regarding teaching techniques. Students will create and present a case study unit. . Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 313, 315, 380, 381, 411, 412, 414, 416, and 425.

    2 credits

    HAD 494 - Clinical Chemistry Practicum

    Full-time instruction and practice of laboratory procedures in clinical chemistry and automation in an approved hospital laboratory. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 313 and HAD 411

    4 credits

    HAD 496 - Histocompatibility Practicum

    Full-time instruction and practice to introduce and expose the student to various methodologies and instrumental techniques used in a histocompatibility laboratory. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HBP 401; Instructor Consent Required

    1 credit

    HAD 497 - Immunohematology Practicum

    Full-time instruction and practice of laboratory procedures in immunohematology (blood banking) in an approved laboratory. Emphasizes laboratory techniques used in the identification and resolution of problems encountered in current blood bank practice. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 416

    3 credits

    HAD 498 - Coagulation and Urinalysis Practicum

    Full-time instruction and practice of laboratory procedures in coagulation and urinalysis in an approved hospital laboratory. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 414

    1 credit

    HAD 506 - Clinical Cytogenetics Internship

    Introduces the students to clinical cytogenetic techniques and standard operating procedures utilized in a clinical cytogenetic laboratory. Permission of department is required. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; HAD 406; Department Consent Required

    3-5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAD 590 - Independent Study/ Clinical Laboratory Sciences

    Proposals for special projects in clinical laboratory sciences must be submitted to the program director for approval prior to registration. Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate CLS Program; Department Consent Required

    1-6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAL 205 - Introduction to Athletic Training

    Introduction to the health care profession of Athletic Training. Explores the global historical development of the profession and the concept of the sports medicine team, as well as medical terminology. Students are required to complete a 50 hour clinical observation. Open to west campus students with permission of department. G/P/NC grading option is not available.

    3 credits

    HAL 210 - Emergency Care of Athletic Injuries

    Recognition and management of medical emergencies with emphasis on those conditions that are most commonly suffered by athletes. Successful completion of the course leads to Health Care Provider Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation(CPR), and Standard First Aid certification by the Emergency Care and Safety Institute. Open to west campus students. This course has an associated fee. Please see www.stonybrook.edu/coursefees for more information. Open to west campus students with permission of department. G/P/NC grading option is not available.

    3 credits

    HAL 300 - Kinesiology

    The mechanical aspects of human motion and the structure and function of these motions in physically active individuals with or without pathological involvement. The student learns basic qualitative and quantitative clinical techniques used in identifying pathological movement. Open to west campus students with permission of department. G/P/NC grading option is not available.

    4 credits

    HAL 305 - Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries

    A course addressing the areas of knowledge, skills, and values needed by an entry-level athletic trainer needs to identify injury and illness risk factors encountered by athletes and others involved in physical activity and to plan and implement a risk management and prevention program. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program3 credits

    HAL 306 - Prophylactic Taping, Bracing and Equipment Fitting

    The student will demonstrate the ability to select and apply preventative and protective taping, wrapping, splinting, bracing, and rehabilitative devices in order to prevent further injury. Additionally, the student will identify, select and fit general protective and sports specific protective athletic equipment. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program2 credits

    HAL 320 - Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis of Lumbar Spine/Lower Extremity

    Focuses on principles of orthopedic examination and assessment. Emphasizes the components of the comprehensive orthopedic clinical evaluation and diagnosis, including history, inspection, palpation, functional testing, and special evaluative techniques of the lumbar spine and lower extremity. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program3 credits

    HAL 321 - Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis Head/Cervical Spine/ Upper Extremity

    This course focuses on the principles of orthopedic examination and assessment. Emphasis will be placed on the components of the comprehensive orthopedic clinical evaluation and diagnosis including: history, inspection, palpation, functional testing, and special evaluation techniques of the head, cervical spine and upper extremity. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program3 credits

    HAL 345 - Therapeutic Modalities

    Knowledge, skills, and values needed by the entry-level athletic trainer to plan, implement, document, and evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic modalities in the treatment of injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved in physical activity.Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program4 credits

    HAL 351 - Research Methods and Biostatistics

    This course introduces the student to research in athletic training. The student learns about the research process, reads, comprehends and appreciates journal articles and begins writing a research proposal on a topic related to athletic training.Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program3 credits

    HAL 355 - General Medical Conditions and Disabilities in the Physically Active

    Presents the pathophysiology and management of common diseases and other medical disorders or disabilities as they relate to athletes and the physically active. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program4 credits

    HAL 360 - Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries

    Presents the principles and objectives inherent in rehabilitating athletic injuries. Discusses orthopedic rehabilitation fundamentals and specific conditioning and re-conditioning techniques. Exposes the student to different types of exercise and equipment used in rehabilitation. Provides laboratory experience in applying various rehabilitation techniques. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program4 credits

    HAL 370 - Exercise Physiology

    Offers the student an understanding and appreciation of the metabolic and physiological adaptations of exercise. In-depth presentation of muscle, cardiac, and pulmonary physiology related to the healthy human at various states: rest, acute exercise, long term exercise under normal and high stress environmental conditions. Includes presentation of food sources, production of energy, and energy systems. Includes information on how training enhances strength, anaerobic power, aerobic power and physique while slowing the effects of aging and aiding in disease prevention. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program4 credits

    HAL 375 - Supplement Use for Sport Performance

    Course introduces the use of supplements in sport from a sports medicine and athletic training perspective. Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using dietary supplements. Presents scientific research on recommended dosage and potential side effects. Both competitive and recreational athletes' needs and concerns are addressed. Upon completion of course, students should be able to evaluate and make recommendations about dietary supplements. Open to west campus students. G/P/NC grading option is not available. Prerequisite: Completion of Any Undergraduate Biology Course or Equivalent

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Any Undergraduate Biology Course or Equivalent2 credits

    HAL 376 - Introduction to Nutrition

    Introduces students to fundamentals of nutritional science and food systems. Reviews dietary sources and functions of macro and micronutrients and the basic of their metabolism and impact on energy balance and common health problems. Explores types of food systems, including production, transformation, distribution, access and consumption and Explores the impact on the environment and human health. Discusses contemporary issues and controversies such as eating disorders, diet trends and sports nutrition. Open to west campus students. G/P/NC grading option is not available.

    2 credits

    HAL 435 - Organization and Admininstration in Athletic Training

    Examines various issues, policies, and procedures involved with the ethical administration of athletic training in a managed-care model, including US federal health care laws, legal liability issues, personnel management, facility organization and design, equipment maintenance, budgeting, record keeping, health care services, counseling, and public relations. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program3 credits

    HAL 450 - Senior Research Seminar in Athletic Training

    Culmination of athletic training curriculum. Students complete and present their research study. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program3 credits

    HAL 460 - BOC Exam Primer

    This course is designed to provide students with information regarding study techniques, test taking strategies, and application procedures for the Board of Certification (BOC)exam. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program1 credit, S/F graded

    HAL 481 - Athletic Training Practicum I

    Assignments in clinical settings related to the students' area of study in prevention and care of athletic injuries, prophylactic taping, bracing and equipment fitting. Students are given the opportunity to observe and integrate skills under the supervision of a Preceptor. Students participate in a laboratory setting that re-evaluates students' skills through patient interaction, psychomotor and scenario simulations. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program3-6 credits

    HAL 482 - Athletic Training Practicum II

    Assignments in clinical settings related to the students' area of study in clinical evaluationa and diagnosis. Students are given the opportunity to observe and integrate skills under the supervision of a Preceptor. Students also participate in a laboratory setting that re-evaluates students' skills through psychomotor and scenario simulations. Provides grand rounds forum. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program7 credits

    HAL 483 - Athletic Training Practicum III

    Assignments in clinical settings related to the students' area of study in clincial evaluation and diagnosis and therapeutic modalities. Students are given the opportunity to observe and integrate skills under the supervision of a Preceptor. Students participate in a laboratory setting that re-evaluates students' skills through psychomotor and scenario simulations. Provides grand rounds forum. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program7 credits

    HAL 484 - Athletic Training Practicum IV

    Assignments in clinical settings related to the students' area of study in prevention and care of athletic injuries, prophylactic taping, bracing, equipment fitting, clinical evaluation and diagnosis. Students are given the opportunity to observe and integrate skills under the supervision of a Preceptor. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program3-6 credits

    HAL 485 - Athletic Training Practicum V

    This course offers assignments in clinical settings related to the students, area of study (rehabilitation of athletic injuries). This course will give the student the opportunity to observe and integrate skills under the supervision of a Preceptor. The student will also participate in a laboratory setting that will re-evaluate the students, previous skills through psychomotor and scenario simulations. This meeting time will also act as a venue to discuss current situations arising at the various sties that will provide for a grand rounds forum. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program7 credits

    HAL 486 - Athletic Training Practicum VI

    This course offers assignments in clinical settings related to the students, area of study (general medical conditions and disabilities). This course will give the student the opportunity to observe and integrate skills under the supervision of a Preceptor including rotations through Physicians practices. The student will also participate in a laboratory setting that will re-evaluate the students' previous skills through psychomotor and scenario simulations. This meeting time will also act as a venue to discuss current situations arising at the various sites that will provide for a grand rounds forum. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program7 credits

    HAL 499 - Athletic Training Teaching Practicum

    Advanced students assist faculty members teaching athletic training classes. In addition to working as tutors during instructional periods, students have regular conferences with a faculty supervisor. Students may not serve as teaching assistants in the same course twice. Prerequisite: Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program. Instructor Consent Required

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Undergraduate Athletic Training Program. Instructor Consent Required2 credits, S/F graded

    HAL 510 - Strength and Conditioning for the Healthcare Practitioner

    Designed to provide a comprehensive overview of strength and conditioning for the future or practicing healthcare practitioner. Emphasizes exercise sciences (including anatomy, exercise physiology, and biomechanics), nutrition, exercise technique, program design, organization, administration, testing, and evaluation. Prepares students for nationally- accredited Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) certification exam. Open to non SHTM students Prerequisite: ANP 300, HAN 200 or Equivalent Anatomy Course; Instructor Consent Required

    Prerequisite(s): ANP 300, HAN 200 or Equivalent Anatomy Course; Instructor Consent Required3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAN 200 - Human Anatomy and Physiology for Health Science I

    This is the first course in a two-part sequence that introduces the study of human anatomy and physiology at cell, tissue, and organ system levels of organization, with emphasis on understanding disease processes associated with systems. Laboratory sessions include virtual on-line exercises designed to illustrate principles learned and computer simulations in physiology and anatomy dissection. G/P/NC grade option is not available. Open to non HSC students. Prerequisite: one natural science course

    Prerequisite(s): one natural science course4 credits

    HAN 202 - Human Anatomy and Physiology for Health Science II

    This is the second course in a two-part sequence that continues the study of human anatomy and physiology. Topics include the endocrine system, blood composition, the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system, the immune system, the respiratory system, the digestive system, nutrition, the urinary system, the reproductive system, fluid, electrolyte, acid-base balance and heredity. Laboratory sessions entail virtual online exercises designed to illustrate principles learned and computer simulations in physiology and anatomy dissection. G/P/NC grade option is not available. Open to non-HSC students. Prerequisite: HAN 200

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 2004 credits

    HAN 251 - Research Methods in Health Science

    Provides a foundation in quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods research design and methods. Emphasizes the relationship between literature review and the research process and the elements of a research proposal. Applies research designs and methods to case study research projects. Requires on-line CITI training in the protection of human subjects. G/P/NC grade option is not available. Open to non HSC students.

    3 credits

    HAN 300 - Health Care Issues

    Provides students with an overview of the organization of the health care delivery system. Includes the role of health care professionals and health care organizations. Explores issues regarding health care insurance, the uninsured and underserved, managed care and changes in the health care marketplace. Provides an overview of major diseases including epidemics, chronic and acute illness. Discusses the role of health promotion and disease prevention as well as alternative and complementary medicine. Prerequisite: Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS3 credits

    HAN 312 - Human Anatomy, Health and Medical Language

    Develops a deeper knowledge of human anatomy and a working medical vocabulary the applies to clinical scenarios. Builds on a foundation of anatomy and physiology. Emphasizes the interrelationships among human anatomy, body systems, pathophysiology and clinical medicine. Introduces the medical professionals and the technology utilized to diagnose and treat patients. G/P/NC grade option is not available. Open to non-HSC students. Prerequisite: HAN 200 or ANP 300.

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 200 or ANP 300.3 credits

    HAN 333 - Communication Skills

    Introduces the principles of effective communication and stages of group development. Offers theory and practice of interpersonal communication and groups. Provides specific topics related to health care teams. Prerequisite: Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS3 credits

    HAN 335 - Professional Ethics

    Provides students with a framework for identifying ethical dilemmas in professional settings.Through the use of case studies and role-playing, students simulate ethical situations relating to confidentiality, informed consent and truth-telling, and explore various approaches for resolving these conflicts. Presents professional codes of ethics using small and large group discussions. Presents and discusses ethics-related topics such as genetics, transplants, cloning, advance directives, and health care accessibility. Prerequisite: Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS3 credits

    HAN 364 - Issues in Health Care Informatics

    Acquaints students with the use and application of personal computers and medical information systems used in health care. Emphasizes the optimization and customization potential of computer functions for standard and specialized tasks. Examines the present and potential use of the Internet in the health care arena. Presents the application of medical informatics to health care delivery though classroom demonstrations and discussions. Prerequisite: Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS3 credits

    HAN 383 - Scholarly Writing in Health Science

    This course is designed to challenge the undergraduate student to improve their skills in scholarly writing and professional communications through a variety of written and verbal formats in a logical, straightforward style. Students will be shown strategies for writing with purpose, supporting detail, and organization. Students will be required to write for a variety of audiences and will conduct a limited literature review, design a research proposal, and create an evidence-based program to be presented to the class. Prerequisite: Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS3 credits

    HAN 395 - Radiation Physics in Medicine

    Provides an introduction to radiological and radiation oncology physics for students interested in a career in either medical imaging or radiation therapy/oncology. Presents elements of mathematics and general physics relevant to the radiological sciences. Topics include production of radiation, radioactivity, interaction of radiations with matter, radiation detection, characteristics of high energy medical LINAC radiation, absorbed dose calculation and measurement, radiography, radionuclide imaging, imaging with ultrasound, imaging with magnetic resonance, and basic medical radiation safety. Prerequisite: Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to Health Science Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS4 credits

    HAN 401 - Radiobiology and Health Physics

    Presents an overview of the biological effects of radiation by examining the interaction of radiation with matter, macromolecules, cells, tissue and the whole body. Studies the clinical impact of responses to radiation. Introduces students to radiation safety through topics such as biologic consequences of irradiation, regulatory limitation of exposure, methods for exposure minimization, and radiation monitoring. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 402 - Radiographic Anatomy and Pathology

    Provides basic radiographic anatomy from both the projection and cross sectional point of view. Introduces to basic disease processes, including the nature and causes of disease and injury. Examines these processes on medical images acquired through radiography, computed tomography, angiography, magnetic resonance, scintigraphy, emission computed tomography and ultrasonography. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 404 - Radiology Instrumentation

    Expands imaging physics into the area of Radiologic Technology. Studies the physical basis, construction, operation, and quality control of radiographic, fluoroscopic, computed radiographic, direct radiographic, digital subtraction, and computed tomography systems. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 405 - Radiographic Technique

    Focuses on production of radiographic image. Includes rationale for selection of technical factors, issues of image resolution and contrast, image receptor technology; film sensitometry; image intensification; film processing; grids; automatic exposure control; portable/surgical procedures; and basic contrast agent pharmacology, and administration directly related to the production of radiographic images. Presents an overview of the special modalities of computed radiography (CR), direct radiography (DR), fluoroscopy, digital fluoroscopy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), computed tomography (CT), and picture archive communication systems (PACS). Special emphasis is placed on reducing patient exposure to radiation. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 406 - Radiologic Procedures and Positioning I

    Examines routine clinical radiographic positioning of the upper and lower extremities, shoulder, spine, chest, pelvis skull, abdomen, and digestive and urinary systems. Includes portable studies, operating room applications, angiography and advanced imaging techniques. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3956 credits

    HAN 409 - Basic CPT Coding

    Provides comprehensive introduction to the purpose and basic applications of the Healthcare Common Procedure Coding Set (HCPCS), which includes Current Procedural Terminology (CPT-4). Topics include coding conventions; formats and instructional notations; definitions of the classification system; and HCPCS/CPT nomenclature. Students will also apply basic guidelines from medical, surgical, evaluation/management, and diagnostic services to identify procedures and services which would be appropriate to code in various healthcare settings. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisites: HAN 200, HAN 202, HAN 312 & HAN 424.

    3 credits

    HAN 410 - ICD-10-CM for Coders

    Focuses on the ICD-10-CM classification systems. Introduces the student to the professional standards for coding and reporting of diagnostic inpatient and outpatient services. Coding characteristics, conventions, and guidelines will be applied in identifying and accurately assigning codes to diseases and conditions. Health records, manual and computerized coding methods, and coding references will be utilized in the coding process. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisites: HAN 200, HAN 202, HAN 312 & HAN 424.

    3 credits

    HAN 416 - Special Issues in Emergency Care and Resuscitation

    Explores issues in special patient populations and areas in emergency care. Covers pediatric emergencies, obstetric emergencies, neonatology, and geriatric emergencies. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 417 - Cardiac Emergencies

    Exposes students to concepts and issues critical to assessment and care of patients presenting with cardiac emergencies. Covers cardiovascular pathophysiology; cardiac patient assessment and management; cardiac electrophysiology; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; and advanced cardiac life support. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 420 - ICD-10-PCS for Coders

    Focuses on the ICD-10-PCS classification system. Introduces professional standards for coding and reporting of inpatient procedure services. Coding characteristics, conventions and guidelines will be applied in identifying and accurately assigning codes to procedures. Health records, manual and computerized coding methods, and coding references will be utilized in the coding process. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisites: HAN 200, HAN 202, HAN 312 & HAN 424.

    3 credits

    HAN 421 - Advanced CPT Coding

    Provides comprehensive advanced coding for the purpose of application of the Healthcare Common Procedure Coding Set (HCPCS), which includes Current Procedural Terminology (CPT-4). Topics include advanced coding conventions; formats and instructional notations; application of the complex areas of the classification system; and HCPCS/CPT nomenclature. Students will also apply advanced coding guidelines from medical, surgical, evaluation/management, and diagnostic services to identify complex procedures and services appropriate to code in various healthcare settings. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisites: HAN 200, HAN 202, HAN 312 & HAN 424.

    3 credits

    HAN 422 - Healthcare Reimbursement

    Introduces the basics of healthcare reimbursement. Includes commercial, managed care and federal insurance plans and how reimbursement systems affect providers, payers and consumers. Emphasizes the prospective payment system, uniform hospital discharge data set, and utilizing inpatient coding knowledge to understand payment methodologies in acute care settings. Incorporates current reimbursement and payment issues mandated by the affordable care act, including accountable care organizations, value-based purchasing and recent PPS rules and regulations. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisites: HAN 200, HAN 202, HAN 312 and HAN 424

    3 credits

    HAN 423 - Coding Practicum

    This 45 hour practicum capstone experience will require students to apply knowledge and skills acquired during the spring concentration's course work. The student will code actual medical records including physician's billing, facility emergency department, facility ambulatory surgery, and facility inpatient. The student will also shadow the Clinical Documentation Improvement staff to fully understand the physician query process and how it interacts with coding. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisites: HAN 409, HAN 410, HAN 420, HAN 421, and HAN 422.

    3 credits

    HAN 424 - Pathophysiology for Healthcare Professionals

    Provides broad but significant immersion in pathophysiology to develop an understanding of common conditions treated in the inpatient and ambulatory settings. Emphasizes a systems based approach to disease states. Highlights the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and pharmacologic treatment and monitoring of the common diseases within each body system that coders encounter in the medical record. Prerequisite: Advancement to Health Sciences Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS.

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to Health Sciences Senior Year Curriculum - HANBS.3 credits

    HAN 426 - Instrumentation for Nuclear Medicine Technology

    Expands on HAN 395, specifically in the area of Nuclear Medicine Technology. Examines the physical basis, construction, operation and quality control of radiation detection, pulse height analysis, planar imaging, Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) imaging and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging devices. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 427 - Nuclear Medicine Procedures

    Covers principles, methods and instrumentation used in Nuclear Medicine imaging. Examines the preparation and performance of planar, Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) nuclear medicine imaging procedures. Provides information needed to perform a variety of imaging and/or functional studies (e.g. liver, spleen, hepatobiliary, gastric reflux, gastrointestinal bleeds, lung, endocrine, central nervous system). Presents in vitro nuclear medicine procedures.Principles of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values of diagnostic testing are also examined. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3956 credits

    HAN 429 - Radiopharmacy and Therapy in Nuclear Medicine

    Examines the production, labeling, quality control, clinical biodistribution, and application of radionuclide tracers for nuclear medicine imaging. Covers radionuclide and radiopharmaceutical characteristics that provide suitable imaging properties. Discusses various aspects of laboratory procedures (e.g. safe handling of radionuclides, radiation safety surveys, hot laboratory instruments, radiopharmaceutical preparation, quality control and sterile technique). Explores pathologies, radiopharmaceuticals, dosage calculation and administration, and patient management issues related to radionuclide therapy. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 432 - Introduction to Health Care Management

    Introduces students to the practices and theories of health care policy and management. Presents an overview of the trends in public policy and management techniques. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    4 credits

    HAN 433 - Statistics for Healthcare Management

    Assists students in defining and understanding the terms used in the statistical treatment of data. Students will perform descriptive and inferential statistical treatments of data (i.e., perform and interpret hypothesis testing). Prerequisite: Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    Prerequisite(s): Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.3 credits

    HAN 434 - Corporate Compliance and Regulation

    Provides an overview of recently enacted legislation requiring health care institutions' compliance programs. Introduces regulations and compliance including anti-trust, controlled substances, Americans with Disabilities Act, Occupational Safety and Health Act, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations, Department of Health jurisdiction over hospitals and licensure requirements. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    4 credits

    HAN 436 - Continuous Quality Improvement in Health Care

    Provides basic principles associated with Total Quality Management (TQM) and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). Aids identification and quality problem-solving found in all health care organizations utilizing CQI tools and techniques. Through the use of case studies, current events, and textbook materials, students will learn how to identify problems, recommend improvements, and collect data to demonstrate process improvement. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 440 - Introduction to Community Health Education

    Introduces students to the foundation of planning, implementing and evaluating community-based health education programs. Presents classic theories of health education including the social learning theory, health belief model, and the attribution theory. Reviews relevant health education programs. Examines various learning styles and skills. Basic health education models are introduced and critiqued through individual and group projects. Reviews health education professional organizations and associations. Each student is required to design a health education program for a selected population. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 441 - Empower SCI:Disability Studies and Independent Living

    Provides an experiential exploration of independent living and disability studies through readings, visuals and activities in the EmpowerSCI program. Readings will introduce students to concepts of independent living as a social and political movement, and practical strategies for its establishment. Prerequisite: Must be involved in the EmpowerSCI program as participant, staff or volunteer. Permission of Instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be involved in the EmpowerSCI program as participant, staff or volunteer. Permission of Instructor.3 credits

    HAN 443 - Aging and Disability

    Provides comprehensive overview of aging and disability. Includes introduction to the field of geriatrics, age related disabilities, and the experiences of people with disabilities as they age. Presents an interdisciplinary perspective. Incorporates social, environmental, cultural, economic and historical issues related to disability and aging. Film, narrative, biography and guest speakers provide students with first-hand accounts of elders with disabilities. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 445 - Independent Living and Disabilty

    Interdisciplinary exploration of how independent living has evolved as a social and political movement. Topics include analyzing current legislation, social issues and living philosophies. Guest speakers will facilitate the students gaining a multi-layered understanding of the issues faced by people with disabilities who are living independently. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 446 - Disability Health and Community

    Presents a comprehensive view of health and community concerns experienced by people with disabilities. Explores historical analysis, biomedical discourse, cultural critique, and field research to understand the evolution of medical practices, cultural beliefs, and social structures influencing the treatments, services, and opportunities available to people with disabilities in the United States and internationally. Includes gender, sexuality, race, poverty, "invisible disabilities", eugenic sterilization, assisted suicide topics. Guest speakers will facilitate a multi-layered understanding of the issues faced by people with disabilities and their families. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 447 - Children with Disabilities

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the theories of child development and issues related to children with developmental spectrum disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders, and communication and learning disorders. Includes behavioral, developmental, language, medical, motor and sensory needs of children with developmental disabilities. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 448 - Disability and Employment

    Presents a comprehensive overview of the Disability and Employment field. Explores pertinent employment-related legislation, the vocational rehabilitation system, the structure of existing governmental and not-for-profit programs, and current disability employment practices, through the use of didactic and experiential techniques. Emphasizes the key roles of placement professionals. Provides individualized learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities who happen to be job seeking. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major

    3 credits

    HAN 449 - Project in Disability Studies

    Students will develop independent projects in topic area of disability studies. They will be required to develop a set of readings, engage in a minimum of 15 hours of experiential learning [in the form of community site-visits, volunteerism, or internships]. Course instructors and assigned mentors will assist students during bi-weekly group meetings and by scheduled appointments. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    4 credits

    HAN 450 - Introduction to Public Health

    Introduces the principles and practices of public health, including definitions and concepts, history and development, determinants of health, and ethical and legal aspects of public health. Orients students to various public health settings such as local and state health departments, not-for-profit community organizations, and agencies for special populations. Provides students with basic knowledge and skills for conducting community needs assessment with diverse populations. Addresses infectious disease control, environmental health, chronic disease control, tobacco and drug control, maternal and child health, women's health, and injury control topics. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 452 - Epidemiology and Biostatistics

    Provides students with the basic knowledge and skills for studying diseases of individuals and groups. Introduces biostatistical approaches and skills for collecting and organizing data of communities to meet health needs. Addresses epidemiological concepts, limitations and resources. Through the use of case studies, students study various epidemiological models used regionally, nationally and internationally. Includes discussions about ethical situations related to research and statistical studies. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 455 - Health Literacy for Public Health

    Explores the ways in which health literacy impacts patient care and the delivery of community health/public health services. Students will learn the skills needed to relay, process, and explain basic health information and services to assist patients and their families to make appropriate health decisions. Examines and analyzes issues of low health literacy, including populations at risk, research, measurement tools, writing in plain language and health communication techniques. Prerequisite: Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    Prerequisite(s): Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.3 credits

    HAN 456 - Behavioral and Social Aspects of Health

    Introduces social and behavioral factors as determinants of health. Explores theories of human and group behavior and health behavior change models through lecture and case study. Explores the dynamics between health behaviors and culture, gender, age and socioeconomic status. Students study various inventory tools for measuring health-related knowledge and methods for measuring behavior change. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 462 - Developing Health Information Systems

    Introduces students to fundamental hardware and software concepts, operating systems, GUI or desktop environments and system development life cycles. Reviews Windows applications such as spreadsheet, database, forms, queries and reports. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    4 credits

    HAN 464 - Health Information Systems Management

    The course includes organizational change issues in health care environments, resource management (inventory, tracking and acquisition) and the role of policy formulation. Consumer issues, standards and security and the provision of health information resources to healthcare workers will also be covered. Relevant applications and issues related to health services will also be explored. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    4 credits

    HAN 465 - Concepts and Case Studies in Health Informatics

    Explores and showcases various health care organizations' selection, implementation and evaluation of current and emerging technologies in Health Care Informatics (HCI). Explores practical applications of health care project management skills obtained from ongoing HCI courses. Analyzes case studies within the HCI sector through a series of dynamic discussions and group projects making recommendations based on research and industry best practices. In a simulated project management environment, students evaluate leadership challenges and methodologies of health informatics applications. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 466 - Applied Health Care Informatics

    Provides overview of the role of information systems in health care organizations. Emphasizes the integration of evidence-based research into clinical decision-making and the influence of information systems on health outcomes. Explores technical, organizational and cost-benefit issues related to health care information systems, including clinical decision-support, integrated networking and distributed computing technologies, telemedicine applications and artificial intelligence solutions. Through a combination of classroom-based seminars, group case studies, and computer laboratory exercises, students will develop and exercise analytical skills for appraising health information systems, as well as acquire practical experience using biomedical research databases, desktop application software, and electronic communication systems. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 467 - Utilization and Outcomes Research Methods

    Provides the necessary tools to evaluate and implement research methods and utilize outcomes within the health care system. Presents an overview of statistics and research methods and evaluation techniques by utilizing group discussions and case studies. Demonstrates the utilization of technology as a resource for existing research as well as management tools. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 470 - Occupational Health and Safety Engineering

    Provides fundamentals of occupational safety and health. Emphasizes safety engineering regulations, codes and practices, safety program administration, recognition of hazards, and implementation of hazard controls. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 471 - Trauma and Trauma Systems

    Explores concepts and issues that are critical to the assessment and care of trauma patients. Covers kinematics, pathophysiology, trauma patient assessment and management, and trauma system development. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 472 - Emergency Response to Hazardous Materials and Terrorism

    Students will learn how healthcare providers recognize and respond to hazardous material (HAZMAT) and terrorist incidents. Includes management strategies for hazardous materials incidents; identification of on-scene indicators of a suspicious incident; recognition of the tactics and objectives of terrorism; and scene/perimeter control issues unique to a terrorist incident. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 474 - Industrial Hygiene

    Introduces basic concepts of industrial hygiene. Presents the methodology and procedures that professionals in the field use to identify, measure, and correct hazards in the work environment. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    4 credits

    HAN 475 - Fundamentals of Environmental Health

    Introduces the key areas of environmental health. Utilizes a population health perspective. Emphasizes core concepts in environmental health (i.e. environmental epidemiology, environmental toxicology, environmental policy and regulation); agents of environmental diseases (i.e. microbial agents, ionizing and nonionizing radiation); and applications and domains of environmental health (i.e. water and air quality, food safety, waste disposal, occupational health, and injuries). Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 476 - Hazardous Materials, Emergency Response and Environmental Auditing

    Concentrates on the nature of hazardous materials and how they are handled in the workplace. Presents the fundamentals of emergency response planning and how to perform environmental audits. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    4 credits

    HAN 477 - Medical Emergencies

    Presents concepts and issues critical to assessment and care of patients presenting with medical emergencies. Covers pathophysiology, medical patient assessment, and management of medical emergencies. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 478 - Internship in Environmental Health

    A 90 hour internship experience provides real-time work experience and opportunity for students to apply knowledge and skills learned in environmental health concentration courses. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    2 credits

    HAN 481 - Introduction to Anesthesia

    Introduces the basics of the anesthesia specialty. Defines the role of the anesthesia specialist as an integral part of the patient care team. Through the use of lecture, video, tour, and hand-on demonstration, students will gain a working knowledge of how to assist anesthesiologists and anesthetists in the acquisition, preparation and application of equipment and supplies required for the administration of anesthesia. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    2 credits

    HAN 482 - Introduction to Pathology

    Pathology is the branch of medicine devoted to the study and understanding of disease. This course will introduce the student to the concept of disease. The types of growth, causative factors and biological behavior of neoplastic diseases are discussed. Staging procedures are introduced. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 483 - Cardiopulmonary Physiology for Anesthesia Technology

    Familiarizes students with the anatomical structures and physiological mechanisms and functions of the cardiopulmonary system. Reviews mathematical formulas and calculations used in clinical applications of physiologic concepts. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    3 credits

    HAN 485 - Clinical Monitoring

    Provides students with a working knowledge of clinical monitoring devices and their application to clinical settings. Covers duties of anesthesia technologist including the provision of technical support to professional staff in order to facilitate anesthesia departmental function. Student develops skills to maintain and organize the anesthesia environment, equipment and supplies. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    1 credit

    HAN 486 - Principles and Practice of Radiation Therapy

    Introduces practice and technical aspects of radiation therapy, including techniques specific to anatomical sites and treatment outcome statistics and options available to cancer patients. Includes cancer statistics; epidemiology; etiology; patient education and assessment; a review of the emotional and physical needs of cancer patients; and pharmacology and drug administration. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 487 - Introduction to Treatment Planning

    Provides a detailed exploration of treatment planning in the field of radiation therapy. Includes, but is not limited to, in-depth instruction in planning algorithms, data transfer, dose computation, plan evaluation and implementation, and Quality Assurance (QA). Reviews and discusses a variety of treatment planning systems and treatment machines. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 488 - Medical Imaging and Radiographic Anatomy

    Presents an overview of a variety of diagnostic imaging modalities and therapeutic applications and procedures provided by modern health care facilities. Discusses imaging equipment and procedures, and includes recording images on film media and operation of photochemical processing equipment. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 489 - Pharmacology for Anesthesia Technology

    Presents basic principles of pharmacologic properties and clinical applications. Through the use of lectures and scenarios, provides working knowledge base of drug classifications and their modes of action to produce therapeutic effects on target sites. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major.

    4 credits

    HAN 490 - Fundamentals of Medical Dosimetry and Contouring

    Covers a variety of Radiation Therapy disease sites that are fundamental to the planning competencies required during the clinical year. Includes radio-geographical cross-sectional anatomy using Computerized Tomography (CT), Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) imaging; full-body anatomical contouring; tolerance doses for critical organs; patient treatment setup; immobilization devices; beam modifiers; Dose Volume Histograms and electron planning including but not limited to 3 Dimensional (3D) planning vs. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) of all competency sites. Discussions include Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols of all competency sites. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science major. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3953 credits

    HAN 492 - Radiation Oncology/Medical Phyics II

    Provides students interested in a career in medical dosimetry with an introduction to medical physics for radiation oncology. This is the second course in a two-part series that provides the basis for further study of the applications of radiation oncology physics to radiation treatment planning and radiation dose calculations. Covers topics such as radiation dose distribution, patient dose calculations, treatment planning, electron beam therapy, brachytherapy, modern treatment delivery, and radiation protection. Restricted to students approved for appropriate senior year track in the Health Science program. Prerequisite: HAN 395

    Prerequisite(s): HAN 3954 credits

    HAN 499 - Health Science Teaching Practicum

    Advanced students assist faculty members teaching Health Science courses. In addition to working as tutors during instructional periods, students have regular conferences with a faculty supervisor. Students are not allowed to apply more than 6 Teaching Practicum credits toward their Bachelor's degree.Permission of the instructor is required.

    1-2 credits

    HAO 310 - Neuroscience

    Presents an integrated approach to the general principles of organization and function of the autonomic, peripheral and central nervous system. Presents principles in a Systems Approach to Neuroscience. The anatomy of a system is followed with its physiology, pathophysiology and clinical relevance to the occupational therapist. Clinical topics include neurological testing, control of posture and balance, pain, muscle tone and spasticity, feedback vs. feedforward control, reflex vs. voluntary control, control of reaching and locomotion, perception and learning. Prerequisites: HBA 461, HBY 350, HAO 319

    4 credits

    HAO 313 - Introduction to Occupational Therapy

    Introduces the history and essential aspects of occupational therapy. Examines philosophical base, definitions related to the practice, scope of practice and role delineations. Provides an orientation to professional organizations, statutes, and credentialing. Open to west campus students.

    1 credit

    HAO 314 - Introduction to Historical and Contemporary Practices of Occupational Therapy

    Introduces values and philosophies that influenced the development of the occupational therapy profession and those that continue to influence current practices.Explores conceptual foundations, ideas, evidence, and resources to promote students' development of applied skills and clinical reasoning to support their clients in achieving greater participation in occupations.

    3 credits

    HAO 315 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy

    Explores major theories and practice frameworks underlying contemporary occupational therapy practice. Reviews sociological and anthropological themes, as well as the impact of the delivery of health care services. Presents theoretical constructs of occupation, purposeful activity and occupational science. Introduces activity analysis, structured observation and documentation. Professional terminology will be studied.

    3 credits

    HAO 319 - Kinesiology for Occupational Therapy

    Explores the kinetics and kinematics of normal, purposeful human movement. Integrates knowledge of human anatomy, physiology, and physics and biomechanics of the human body. Evaluation procedures such as manual muscle testing and measurement of joint range of motion are studied. Emphasizes importance of human movement as it relates to human function in occupational roles.Prerequisite: HBA 461; Corequisite: HBP 310

    Prerequisite(s): HBA 461; Corequisite: HBP 3104 credits

    HAO 320 - Life Span Growth and Development for Occupational Therapy

    Provides students with knowledge of the major developmental theories and factors influencing the normal developmental process. Examines developmental norms and sequences and emphasizes physical (sensory and motor), cognitive, language and psychosocial tasks. Discusses cultural and environmental influences on development. The coursework covers the entire lifespan, from prenatal and child, through adolescence and adult life stages to dying and death.

    3 credits

    HAO 323 - Mental Health Concepts

    Explores the psychosocial aspects of disability as they affect the function of the individual, the family and the community. Includes lectures and presentations related to the recognition of psychosocial problems and how they can be better understood, minimized, or eliminated. Delineates the provision of mental health services across all levels of care. Includes the process of applying evidence based practices. Discusses multicultural factors as they relate to mental illness and the recovery process. Exposes the student to the DSMIV diagnoses and pharmacology of major psychiatric illnesses and reviews psychological theories. Interviewing skills are demonstrated and practiced in the lab sessions. Emphasizes the importance of group dynamics in the student's personal and professional growth. Focuses on the use of group theories, the structure and function of groups in treatment, the analysis of group treatment and group activities, and the therapeutic use of self.

    3 credits

    HAO 324 - Psychosocial Theory and Practice

    Offers increased understanding of the identification and treatment of psychosocial disabilities across the life span. Teaches major assessment tools and practice frameworks used in contemporary occupational therapy mental health practice and documentation skills. Presents additional therapeutic activities, their use and gradation in psychosocial practice. Addresses the history, practice and legislation concerning community mental health practice, psychiatric rehabilitation, and work with developmentally disabled populations.

    3 credits

    HAO 330 - Occupational Therapy Theory and Practice in Pediatrics

    Presents occupational therapy theories, assessments, and treatment processes as they pertain to current pediatric practice. Reviews the predominant models of current practice and integrates effective treatment interventions. Emphasizes abnormal development, acute and chronic medical conditions and their resulting effects on the central nervous system, orthopedic and musculoskeletal systems. Reviews major causes of disability, the etiology and prognoses. Discusses the impact on the family system and the cultural implications. Students learn to select and adapt age and developmental stage appropriate evaluation and treatment intervention strategies. Teaches students to analyze occupationally-based activities. Prerequisites: HAO 315, HAS 300, HAO 320, HBA 461, HAO 319, HBP 310, HBY 350; Corequisite: HAO 310

    4 credits

    HAO 331 - Occupational Therapy Theory and Practice with Adults I

    First of two course sequence the provides entry level knowledge and attitudes necessary to effectively work as an occupational therapist with adult populations in multiple settings. Supports occupational therapy performance and quality of life. Introduces core concepts of the occupational therapy and physcial disabilities environment. Offers opportunity to define the role of occupational therapists and the impact of a multidisciplinary team on their role as a team member within the continuum of care. Prerequisites: HAO 315 and HAO 385

    2 credits

    HAO 332 - Occupational Therapy Theory and Practice with Adults II

    Second of two part course sequence that focus on evaluation and treatment of adults with physical disabilities. Focuses on the evaluation and treatment of adults with physical disabilities. Examines injury, illness, disease and the effects on occupational performance in the areas of work, self-care and leisure. Presents relevant occupational therapy theories and practice. Explores practice frameworks, evaluation/assessments, treatment interventions, selection of age-appropriate occupation-based activities, and activity analysis. Offers opportunity to further refine documentation and clinical reasoning skills through written and verbal assignments. Prerequisites: HAO 315, HAO 331, HAO 385

    3 credits

    HAO 334 - Acute Care

    This course covers the occupational therapist's scope of practice, as well as the current assessment, treatment, and documentation methods utilized by occupational therapists in an acute care setting. Students are introduced to high technology equipment found in an acute care setting, i.e. life support, ICU, CCU, PCU, and NICU monitoring devices. Areas discussed include acute care risk factors, the complicated diagnoses often seen in this setting, the role of occupational therapists within this setting, frames of references and treatment techniques, modalities utilized.

    1 credit

    HAO 338 - Substance Abuse and Occupational Therapy

    Utilizes a life-span approach to examining the physiological, psychological and societal effects of substance abuse on the individual and their family system. Reviews the major categories of drugs, specific drugs in each category, and the effects and withdrawal symptoms. Discusses major theories of substance abuse and philosophies, treatment models, and age specific interventions. Emphasizes the role of the occupational therapist in the identification and evaluation of the individual using/abusing substances. Students learn to design group and individual treatment interventions for specific populations.

    2 credits

    HAO 340 - Prosthetics and Orthotics

    Utilizes lecture, discussion and laboratories to teach students about the design, biomechanical principles, fit, function, use, care and patient education involved with upper extremity orthotics. Although there is an emphasis on the design, fabrication and use of upper extremity orthotics, students are introduced to upper and lower extremity prosthetic devices, as well as the use of splints in burn care.

    2 credits

    HAO 374 - Professional Behaviors I

    Focuses on expectations of professional behavior at fieldwork sites. Integrates reflective journals and professional portfolio to document clinical competence. Examines the nature of the supervisory process and how to maximize the use of clinical and administrative supervision. Explores cultural competency and the scope of diversity in healthcare.

    1.5 credits

    HAO 385 - Conditions in Occupational Therapy

    Provides foundation of clinical diagnoses, symptomatology, and prognosis of common medical conditions across the life span. Emphasizes the impact of disease on society, families and individual physical, cognitive and emotional function.

    2 credits

    HAO 396 - Fieldwork IA

    The first of three introductory level clinical experiences. Offers opportunity to identify symptomology, observe treatment interventions, and formulate treatment plans in a mental health setting. Promotes effective communication skills used with patients and professionals. Uses reflective journals to monitor development of professional behaviors and skills.

    1 credit

    HAO 397 - Fieldwork IB

    The second of three introductory level clinical experiences. Offers opportunity to identify symptomology, observe treatment interventions, and formulate treatment plans in a pediatric practice setting. Promotes effective communication skills used with patients and professionals. Uses reflective journals to monitor development of professional behaviors and skills. Prerequisites: HAO 310, 320, 330, 323, 324, 374, 385

    1 credit

    HAO 398 - Fieldwork IC

    The third of three introductory level clinical experiences. Offers opportunity to identify symptomology, observe treatment interventions, and formulate treatment plans in an adult physical disabilities practice setting. Promotes effective communication skills used with patients and professionals. Uses reflective journals to monitor development of professional behaviors and skills. Prerequisites: HAO 310, 320, 323, 324, 332, 374, 385

    1 credit

    HAO 421 - Physical Agent Modalities for the Occupational Therapist

    Presents physical agent modalities utilized as adjuncts to occupational therapy treatment. Reviews therapeutic applications of heat and cold, ultrasound, paraffin, TENS and functional electric stimulation. Provides opportunity to practice applications. Addresses physiological effects of physical agent modalities and their clinical uses and contraindications.

    1 credit

    HAO 430 - Sensory Integration Theory and Practice in Occupational Therapy

    Enhances basic knowledge and skills regarding sensory integration theory and techniques. Identifies types of sensory integrative dysfunction, reviews approaches to clinical assessment, outlines characteristics of both direct and indirect modes of intervention, and addresses the issue of effectiveness research. Prerequisites: HAO 310, HAO 315, HAO 320, HAO 330

    2 credits

    HAO 440 - Gerontology and Occupational Therapy

    Focuses on the role of occupational therapists with older adults and families across the continuum of care. Addresses the influence of aging processes on physical, sensory, and cognitive function and their relationship to functional capabilities. Discusses psychosocial aspects of aging, and how environment, culture, and values impact lifestyle and occupational performance. Theories, issues, and clinical skills specific to practice in geriatric rehabilitation, home health care, long term care, adult day care programs, hospice, and community practice, including wellness and prevention programs are addressed. The role of practitioners with older adults with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, lifestyle redesign, the use of assistive technology to promote safety and functional capability, and the role of occupational therapy with the elderly driver is emphasized. Discusses the role of occupational therapy in supporting older adult's health, quality of life and community living. Students learn methods of assessment, use of EMB to help guide treatment, interdisciplinary approaches of providing treatment and methods of utilizing community resources to maximize the functional capabilities of older adults.

    3 credits

    HAO 451 - Introduction to Research for Occupational Therapy

    Provides a foundation for future professional and scholarly activities and stresses the importance of research for informed practice decisions. Students learn basic research concepts and statistical applications for the research process. Students learn to review and critique published, peer-reviewed research, identify research topics of interest, and initiate the literature review process. Presents tools needed to critique assessment tools in occupational therapy and interpret standardized scores. Requires the CORIHS human subjects research training. Emphasizes professional writing skills for publications and professional presentations.

    3 credits

    HAO 461 - Functional Anatomy for Occupational Therapy

    Presents an anatomical review of all bodily systems for students to acquire a working knowledge of the functional structure of the human body. Provides foundational knowledge for all other courses in the OT program. Builds on the students' prerequisite anatomy and physiology courses. Provides the anatomical knowledge related to the bodily systems in order to understand movement and function and selected pathological conditions, and their relationship to occupational therapy performance deficits in the physical domain.

    4 credits

    HAO 485 - Vision, Perception and Cognition

    Provides students with theoretical rationale and necessary skills to evaluate and treat a wide range of visual, perceptual and cognitive task components. Through a combination of lecture, demonstrations, readings and assignments, students will evaluate patients with visuocognitive dysfunction. Presents a variety of treatment approaches/techniques that can improve functional performance and outcome.

    2 credits

    HAO 500 - Functional Neuroscience

    Presents an integrated approach to the general principles of organization and function of the autonomic, peripheral and central nervous systems. Presents these principles in a systems approach to neuroscience. The anatomy of a system will be followed with its physiology, pathophysiology relation to human function and clinical relevance to the occupational therapist. Clinical topics will include neurological testing, control of posture and balance, pain, muscle tone and spasticity, feedback versus feed-forward control, reflex versus voluntary control, control of reaching and locomotion, perception, and learning. Prerequisite: HAO 519, HAO 561

    Prerequisite(s): HAO 519, HAO 5614 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 504 - Introduction to the Historical and Contemporary Practices of Occupational Therapy

    Introduces occupational therapy students to the values and philosophies that influenced the development of the profession, and those that continue to influence current practices. Explores conceptual foundations, ideas, evidence, and resources that allow learners to begin developing applied skills and clinical reasoning skills to support clients in achieving greater participation in the occupations they want and need. The goal of the course is to have learners develop beginning skills for conducting contemporary occupational therapy practices.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 505 - Foundations in Occupational Therapy

    Provides a conceptual foundation for occupational therapy theory and practice. Instructs students on the concepts of occupation, activity, purposeful activity and participation. Through lecture and laboratory sessions, students will experience working with the concepts they are learning. Examines the philosophical base of the profession, and explores the meaning and diversity of the frames of reference in contemporary occupational therapy practice. Emphasizes the centrality of occupation in health and wellness, through balance in performance areas and contexts. Explores the impact of disability, disease, and injury on the person, their family and society. Students will learn how to break down and analyze activities for their performance components, as well as how to grade and adapt activities for therapeutic purposes. Group discussions on social and political systems will focus on how they influence the delivery of health care services. Introduces the impact of culture on treatment and health practices. Explores the concept of theory development, and how theories, models of practice and frames of reference impact occupational therapy evaluation/treatment.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 506 - Life Span Growth and Development for Occupational Therapy

    Provides students with a knowledge of developmental theories and factors influencing the normal developmental process. Developmental norms and sequences are examined with emphasis on physical (sensory and motor), cognitive, and psychosocial tasks. Discusses cultural and environmental influences on development. The coursework covers prenatal, child, adolescent, and adult development utilizing many frames of references from occupational therapy points of view regarding development.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 507 - Clinical Conditions in Occupational Therapy

    Addresses clinical diagnoses, symptomatology, and prognosis of many major clinical conditions commonly encountered in current practice. Emphasize the impact of disease on individual physical, cognitive and emotional function and on families and society. Case studies will be utilized within this course to enable students to relate major theories and frames of reference to treatment approaches for common diagnoses and medical conditions. The course is intended to help build a foundation for subsequent occupational therapy theory and practice courses and to provide a foundation for Fieldwork II experiences. Prerequisites: HAO 505; HAO 519; HAO 561

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 508 - Theories of Adult Rehabilitation

    Provides entry-level knowledge and attitudes necessary to effectively work as an occupational therapist with the adult population in multiple settings to support occupational performance and quality of life. Discusses and evaluates the core concepts of the occupational therapy and physical disabilities environment. Students will be able to define the role of the occupational therapist as well as the impact of a multidisciplinary team on their role as a team member and within the continuum of care of adults while applying evidence based practice. Prerequisites: HAO 505; HAO 507

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 509 - Occupational Therapy Theory and Practice in Pediatrics

    Presents occupational therapy theories, assessments, and treatment processes as they pertain to the pediatric population. Integrates several of the predominant models in current practice with material from previous and concurrent coursework. Covers abnormal development, acute and chronic medical conditions, their effect on the CNS, orthopedic and musculoskeletal systems.. Reviews major causes of disability, the etiology and prognoses Discusses the impact on the family and cultural implications. Students learn about selecting age and developmental stage appropriate evaluations, treatment techniques/procedures. Students enhance their activity analysis skills, assessment, treatment planning, documentation skills, and professional interaction through laboratory, class assignments, and fieldwork. Prerequisite: HAO 505; HAO 507; HAO 561

    Prerequisite(s): HAO 505; HAO 507; HAO 5614 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 517 - Universal Design

    Focuses on adapting the environment to improve the client's quality of life. Examines the therapist's ability to help the patient reintegrate into society. Covers Americans with Disabilities Act; mobility (power and manual); seating/positioning systems; adapted toys; augmentative communication systems; computer access; environmental control units; independent living aids; and vocational adaptations. Provides foundation and knowledge of ergonomic, work hardening, functional capacity evaluations, and vocational programs. Exposes students to different occupational therapy work settings and employment, awareness of federal regulations for work-related programs, and certification requirements for this emerging practice area. The lab sessions offer practical applications of principles discussed in lectures.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 519 - Kinesiology for Occupational Therapy

    Kinesiology is the study of human motion. Designed to establish a working knowledge of biomechanical principles as well as detailed understanding of the osteokinematics and arthokinematics of the various joints of the body. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of biomechanics into real life functional applications for a variety of occupations. The course consists of both lecture and laboratory sessions. Laboratory sessions provide the student with practical applications of principles discussed in lecture. In addition, the laboratory sessions will allow the student to become proficient in the areas of surface anatomy and palpation, manual muscle testing, and goniometry. The student will study normal and pathological movement, including its impact on function. Prerequisite: HAO 561

    Prerequisite(s): HAO 5614 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 520 - Substance Abuse and Occupational Therapy

    Addresses physiological, sociological, and psychological effects of substance abuse on the abuser and his/her environment. Presents drug classifications, along with effects and withdrawal symptoms. Discusses treatment models, philosophies, and methods. Students will learn how to design both individual and group interventions. Explores in detail the occupational therapists role in the evaluation and treatment of substance abuse across the life-span and across disabilities. Reviews the use of 12-step programs and alternative treatment models, as will prevention programs, such as smoking cessation. Requires Internet Explorer 10, 9, or 8; Firefox; Chrome; Windows 8, 7, Vista or XP; Mac OS X 10.6, 10.7 and 10.8; or Safari 5.1 and 6 Prerequisites: HAO 523, HAO 505

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 522 - Assessment and Treatment of Adult Rehabilitation

    This is the second part of a two part course where learning activities focus on the valuation and treatment of adults with physical disabilities. Examines injury, illness, disease and the effect on occupational performance in the areas of work, self-care and leisure. Occupational therapy theories and practice are learned, including frames of reference, evaluation/assessments, treatment interventions, selection of age-appropriate occupation-based activities, and activity analysis are explored. Students will have the opportunity to further refine their documentation and clinical reasoning skills through written and verbal assignments and apply evidence based practices. Prerequisites: HAO 505, HAO 507, HAO 508

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 523 - Assessment and Intervention of Psychosocial Issues

    Explores the psychosocial aspects of disability as they affect the function of the individual, the family and the community. Lectures and presentations will be related to the recognition of psychosocial problems and how they can be better understood, minimized, or eliminated. Provision of mental health services across all levels of care will be delineated. Multicultural factors will be discussed as they relate to mental illness and the recovery process. The course exposes the occupational therapy student to the DSM-V and the pharmacology of major mental illnesses. Psychosocial theories guiding assessment and intervention will be thoroughly discussed. Interviewing skills are demonstrated and practiced in the lab sessions. The use of group theories, the structure and function of groups in treatment, the analysis of group treatment and group activities and the therapeutic use of self are the focus in laboratory and lectures. Students will be introduced to and given the opportunity to practice a variety of assessments utilized in psychosocial occupational therapy practice. This course is to provide the student with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to function as an occupational therapist in a psychosocial/mental health treatment setting. Prerequisite: HAO 504

    Prerequisite(s): HAO 5044 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 524 - Assessment & Interventions of the Upper Extremities

    Through lecture, student/instructor interaction, projects, and laboratory experience, students will develop a knowledge base of fundamental upper extremity therapy topics that will provide a foundation for clinical reasoning and treatment approach. Topics will include anatomy, common pathologies, orthotics, evaluation, and treatment. The course will teach students about the design, biomechanical principles, fit, function, use, care and patient education involved with upper extremity orthotics; students are introduced to upper and lower extremity prosthetic devices. Lecture and laboratory study will enable the occupational therapy student to gain an understanding of various physical agents currently used in the rehabilitation practices. Prerequisite: HAO 500, HAO 507, HAO 508, HAO 519, HAO 522

    Prerequisite(s): HAO 500, HAO 507, HAO 508, HAO 519, HAO 5223 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 525 - Vision, Perception, and Cognition

    Focuses on principles and techniques for the rehabilitation of visuocognitive dyfunction. Presents the theoretical rationale and specific skills needed to evaluate and treat a wide range of visual, perceptual and cognitive performance components. Includes a systematic bottom up approach to the evaluation of the adult patient with visuocognitive dysfunction. Explores a variety of treatment approaches and specific treatment techniques that can improve functional performance and outcomes, drawing from both the neurosciences and Occupational Therapy frames of reference. Emphasizes clinical reasoning and the use of both remediation and compensatory strategies within the framework of Occupational Therapy practice. Prerequisites: HAO 505, HAO 507, HAO 508

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 526 - Gerontology and Occupational Therapy

    Focuses on the role of occupational therapy with the aged within geriatric rehabilitation settings (in-patient, out-patient and home care); long-term care programs; wellness and safety programs; hospice; community based programs (socialization, day treatment, adult day care programs), and alternative housing environments. Addresses the aging process and its physiological, sociological, and psychological effects, with attention to heterogeneity and older person's strengths and capabilities. Presents common impairments and disabilities and rehabilitation needs of older persons. Students will develop and demonstrate skills in evaluation, treatment planning and therapeutic adaptation, documentation, and discharge planning (including collaborative client and family education), and demonstrate knowledge of assistive devices, equipment, and technology/ environmental modifications to support community living and to improve the quality of life of older persons. Addresses the importance of evidence-based practice, including occupational therapy, life-long learning and professional development, the benefits of collaborative OT -OTA partnerships and the relationships between policy, legislation and practice. Include aging and gender issues, successful aging, and community and home safety. Provides a conceptual framework for the study of gerontology as it relates to occupational therapy and develops the skills and knowledge to understand major issues in theory, research, and practice related to the older adult. Prerequisites: HAO 505, HAO 507, HAO 508, HAO 522

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 527 - Sensory Integration Theory and Practice in Occupational Therapy

    Presents understanding of how sensory integration as a brain function as it relates to everyday occupations and how sensory integration is manifested in the daily life problems of children who experience difficulty with sensory integration. Expands sensory integration knowledge base and skills as a clinical frame of reference by identifying types of sensory integrative dysfunction; reviewing approaches to clinical assessment; outlining the characteristics of both direct and indirect modes of intervention; and addressing the issue of effectiveness research. Prerequisites: HAO 509, HAO 506, HAO 505

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 530 - Community, Occupation and Health

    Presents the importance of occupation as a precursor to health, and of occupational therapy as a health promoting profession. Examines the theories and applications of occupational science through a review of the professional literature and class discussion. This occupational perspective of health will be the foundation for each student's design of a community-based practice program. Reviews social theories, socio-cultural and socio-political trends that impact the individual's health status and the delivery of health care services. Offers experience in designing/administering needs assessments in the community, and in organizing outcome data.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 532 - Emerging Areas of Practice

    Discusses the delivery of occupational therapy services in emerging areas of practice. Provides students with alternative models of service delivery and occupational therapy practice. Explores role development and delineation; ethical practice; malpractice; liability concerns; insurance reimbursement; scope of practice and licensure statutes related to emerging areas. Prerequisites: HAO 323, 324, 330, 332, 440, 530

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 534 - The Occupational Therapy Manager

    This course builds on previously learned management concepts examining in greater detail the specific responsibilities of the manager of occupational therapy services. Students will learn the mechanics of designing and implementing an occupational therapy department, program or practice. Financial, legal and administrative issues will be discussed, along with marketing strategies. Lectures and class discussions will prepare the student for the culminating course assignment of designing a unique occupational therapy practice. Prerequisite: successful completion of undergraduate Occupational Therapy curriculum.

    Prerequisite(s): successful completion of undergraduate Occupational Therapy curriculum.3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 542 - Patient Education

    Provides working knowledge of the theories, approaches, and procedures utilized in communicating health and disease information to patients, their families, collateral staff and the community at large. Concepts of health, disease, and health promotion are examined, along with the health belief models. Further develops the students' ability to communicate effectively with a wide variety of audiences. Topics include evaluation of literacy, design of instructional materials, evaluating audiovisual materials, health promotion strategies, marketing educational interventions, and measuring outcomes of interventions. Lectures, learning activities and classroom presentations will be utilized to meet the course objectives.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 549 - Introduction to Research for Occupational Therapy

    Description: Provides a foundation for future professional and scholarly activities and stresses the importance of research for informed practice decisions. Presents basic research concepts and statistical applications for the research process. Presents methods to review and critique published, peer-reviewed research, identify research topics of interest, and initiate the literature review process. Provides tools needed to critique commonly used assessment tools in occupational therapy and to use and interpret standardized scores. Requires the CORIHS human subjects research training. Emphasizes professional writing skills for publications and professional presentations. Explores current research methodologies used in occupational therapy to facilitate beginning research skills. Prerequisite: Completion of all first year courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all first year courses.3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 551 - Research Design and Methods for OT

    Provides students beginning research and critical inquiry skills through learning current occupational therapy related research methods and by the design of research grant proposals. Students gain fundamental critical inquiry and writing skills necessary to identify appropriate funding sources and write grant proposals for research and program development. Students learn to design qualitative research projects and analyze qualitative data.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 561 - Functional Anatomy Review

    Provides an anatomical review of all bodily systems in order for students to acquire a basic working knowledge of the functional structure of the human body. Provides foundational knowledge for all other courses in the Occupational Therapy Program. Students will apply knowledge learned to formulate hypotheses about occupational dysfunction associated with abnormalities within systems. Utilizes critiques of research to expand on knowledge from lecture and lab.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 562 - Principles of Instruction

    Examines theories of adult learning and education. Focus on principles of curriculum design, various curriculum models, and instructional methods used in various educational settings including professional education, professinal development, work place learning and community education. Reviews evaluation and measurement methods. Students design course objectives and outcomes. Discusses elements of successful oral presentations and effective use of instructional media. Prerequisites: Open to third year OT students

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 570 - Global Communities, Occupations and Health

    Explores innovative, non-traditional and emerging areas of occupational therapy practice. Students meet and dialog with occupational therapy practitioners and/or other health care professionals who have developed private practices, are consultants, and are involved in emerging areas of practice. Presents timely articles concerning health care trends and non-traditional/emerging practice areas. Builds upon student's prior knowledge and coursework and integrates AOTA's Standards of Practice, Core Values and Attitudes of OT, and AOTA's Code of Ethics, with attention to current and potential OT/OTA partnerships in community and non-traditional settings. Prerequisite: Fall Year three courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Fall Year three courses.2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 573 - Professional Behaviors I

    Introduces professional behaviors, including basic communication and documentation skills, with a focus on expectations of fieldwork sites. Students will learn the concept of reflective practice, and how to use a reflective journal. Introduces the professional portfolio as a means to document clinical competence. Examines the nature of the supervisory process with strategies to maximize the use of clinical and administrative supervision. Explores cultural competency and the scope of diversity in health care. Emphasizes the importance of life-long learning through continuing education and other methods. Includes lectures, presentations, role-plays and other exercises to achieve learning objectives. Prerequisite: Year One Summer and Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): Year One Summer and Fall Courses1.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 574 - Professional Behaviors II

    Builds on previously learned material covered in Professional Behaviors I. Students will work on more advanced documentation and communication skills required for entry-level practice. Provides opportunity to discuss professional behavior expectations from their clinical fieldwork assignments. Use of the reflective journal to enhance professional development, and the continuation of the professional portfolio will assist students in developing and documenting their clinical competence. Explores the supervisory process in greater detail, in the context of its use for personal and professional growth. Discusses the role of the occupational therapy assistant as a colleague and collaborator. Continues to emphasize the importance of life-long learning. Lectures, role-plays, presentations and experiential activities will be used to achieve learning outcomes. Prerequisite: successful completion of undergraduate Occupational Therapy curriculum

    Prerequisite(s): successful completion of undergraduate Occupational Therapy curriculum1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 575 - Professional Transitional Seminar

    Discusses issues related to transition of student to entry-level practitioner role. Presents information on licensure, certification exam preparation, NBCOT certification, AOTA specialty examinations, models of supervision, mentoring, job search strategies, marketing skills, malpractice, continuing competency, professional organizations, networking and career goal planning.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 580 - Special Topics in Occupational Therapy

    Offers students the opportunity to explore and expand knowledge and skills in a practice area of specific interest.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 585 - Disability Studies and Occupational Therapy

    Introduces a social model of disability and explores the ethical and psychological issues faced by people with disabilities across their lifespan. Presents historical analysis, healthcare discourse, and cultural critique to understand the evolution of health practice, cultural beliefs and social structures influencing the treatments, services, and opportunities available to people with disabilities in the United States and internationally. Offers students a multi-layered understanding of the issues faced by people with disabilities and their families. Includes assigned readings, films, guest speakers, site visits, and one-on-one interactions with people with disabilities.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 586 - Fieldwork Level IA

    The first of three introductory level clinical experiences. Offers the opportunity to identify symptomotology, observe treatment interventions and formulate treatment plans in a psychosocial practice setting. Promotes effective communication skills used with patients and professionals. Uses reflective journals to monitor development of professional behaviors and skills. Prerequisite: HAO 523

    Prerequisite(s): HAO 5231 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 587 - Fieldwork Level IB

    This is the second of three introductory level clinical experiences. It provides students with the opportunity to identify symptomatology, observe treatment interventions, and formulate treatment plans in an adult physical disabilities setting. It is designed to promote effective communication skills used with patients and professionals. Reflective practice journals will be used to monitor professional behaviors and skills. Prerequisites: HAO 508 HAO 586.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 588 - Fieldwork Level I C

    The third of three introductory level clinical experiences. Offers the opportunity to identify symptomotology, observe treatment interventions and formulate treatment plans in a pediatric practice setting. Promotes effective communication skills used with patients and professionals. Uses reflective journals to monitor development of professional behaviors and skills. Prerequisites: HAO 586, HAO 587

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 590 - Independent Study in Occupational Therapy

    Students develop and/or implement their research projects under the mentorship of the course instructor and a faculty advisor who has expertise in their chosen topic. Literature reviews are completed and the project is prepared in a format appropriate for professional publication or presentation.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 592 - Case Studies II

    This seminar-style course further develops the student's clinical reasoning skills. Building on experiences from Case Studies I, students are expected to synthesize knowledge gained from basic science and theory/practice courses, along with initial Level I fieldwork experiences to formulate treatment planning on hypothetical cases. Covers the current assessment, treatment, and documentation methods utilized by occupational therapists in a variety of physical disabilities settings. Students have the opportunity to work independently as well as in small groups when reviewing and discussing patient cases that concern areas such as complicated diagnoses, risk factors, the role of occupational therapy within the specific setting, frames of references, treatment techniques/modalities, discharge planning, safety issues, and follow up. Cases are presented in written as well as oral formats.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 593 - Case Studies III

    The third in a series of three clinical reasoning seminars, this course will focuses on the synthesis of all clinical and academic coursework in formulating a comprehensive plan of care. Greater emphasis on students responding spontaneously to case presentations in class, much as they would be expected to do in the clinical setting.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 595 - Service Learning and Capstone Project

    Incorporates in-depth theoretical and practical knowledge for maximum integration of service and classroom work. Includes discussion, journals, essays and other reflective writing methods. Explores reflection, action skill buiilding, and examination of theory and practice of citizenship as applied though community involvement. Students provide 30 hours of service learning. A scholarly project will be the culminating activity for the program. Students will present outcomes of their service learning project in poster format. Pre-requisite: HAO 597.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAO 596 - Fieldwork Level IIA

    Fieldwork IIA is an in-depth clinical experience in the delivery of occupational therapy services. According to AOTA guidelines, this fieldwork is designed to promote clinical reasoning and reflective practice; transmit values and beliefs that enable the application of ethics related to the profession; enable the student to communicate and model professionalism as a developmental process and career responsibility; and develop and expand a repertoire of occupational therapy assessments and interventions related to human occupation and performance. This first of two level II fieldwork experiences exposes the student to a variety of clinical conditions in a specific practice area for 12 weeks on a full time basis.

    12 credits, S/F graded

    HAO 597 - Fieldwork IIB

    This second clinical fieldwork experience provides the occupational therapy student with opportunities to apply the knowledge and skills learned thus far in the curriculum. Students will be assigned to a fieldwork site for 12 weeks on a full time basis in a particular area of practice.

    12 credits, S/F graded

    HAO 598 - Fieldwork IIC

    Fieldwork IIC is the third of three in-depth clinical experiences in the delivery of occupational therapy services, designed to promote clinical reasoning and reflective practice; transmit values and beliefs that enable the application of ethics related to the profession; enable the student to communicate and model professionalism as a developmental process and career responsibility; and to develop competency and expand a repertoire of occupational therapy assessments and interventions related to human performance. The three Level II fieldwork experiences expose students to a variety of clinical conditions and practice areas across the life span. Students are assigned to a fieldwork site for 10 weeks on a full time basis.

    10 credits, S/F graded

    HAO 599 - Fieldwork Continuation

    This course is for occupational therapy students continuing with Fieldwork.

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HAP 501 - Community Health and Service Learning for Physician Assistant

    Provides opportunities for PA students to learn and reinforce medical knowledge and skills through service to local and international communities. Learning methods will enhance the acquisition of clinical skills, cultural competencies and expand knowledge of community resources for underserved populations. Open to entry-level PA students only.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 504 - Professional Practice Issues

    Provides information critical to understanding the development and organization of the physician assistant profession in the United States. Explores the dynamics of PA practice, including such issues as responsibilities to patients and the public, professional regulation and involvement, team care, cultural diversity, and developing trends in PA practice. Encourages the exploration, critiques, and evaluation of professional practice issues related to the quality, delivery and cost-effectiveness of our nation's health care system. Open to entry-level PA students only.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 505 - Contemporary Issues in Health Care Delivery

    Provides physician assistants an overview of important information and trends in health care delivery in the 21st century. Includes topics such as health care systems; health policy and advocacy; information technology; medical genetics and pharmacogenomics; geriatrics; health law; health literacy; health disparities; and other contemporary topics. Presents opportunities for students to explore in depth one special interest area. Open to post professional PA students only.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 509 - Integrative Systems Physiology

    Introduces students to human integrative systems physiology. Includes exposure to physiological control systems, emphasizes in detail each organ system and how homeostasis is maintained. Includes membrane, muscle, central and peripheral nervous system, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, and endocrine physiology. Presents material and incorporates select examples of pathophysiology to emphasize relevance of material. Students will solidify an understanding of the structures and functions across all systems in the human body under normal conditions and select pathophysiology. Knowledge gained of normal function will be applied towards making predictions about physiologic function in response to disease states. Students are expected to gain a cumulative understanding of physiologic function and are challenged to apply this knowledge towards problem solving and interpreting physiologic scenarios.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 510 - Clinical Laboratory Medicine

    Presents fundamental principles of laboratory medicines. Strengthens the student's ability to select, perform and interpret the results of basic clinical laboratory procedures to aid in formulating a preliminary diagnosis and management plan. The course is offered after students have acquired a foundation in human physiology and anatomy. Open to entry-level PA students only.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 511 - Clinical Pharmacology Seminar for Physician Assistants

    Provides an opportunity for physician assistants to enhance their ability to rationally prescribe pharmaceuticals. The on-line seminars/case discussions integrate information presented via classroom and web-based lectures. At the completion of this course, students will have deepened their understanding of how to appropriately select medications in various clinical settings, with knowledge of potential advantages, disadvantages, and relative costs. Post-professional PA students only.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 512 - Principles of Clinical Pharmacology

    Physician assistant students will learn to rationally and safely prescribe pharmaceuticals for patients in a variety of clinical settings. Emphasizes the integration of pharmacologic principles and properties with the clinical uses of the most commonly prescribed medications and provides an opportunity for students to deepen understanding and application of knowledge in the setting of patient clinical cases. Reinforces and integrates course information with content learned during the Clinical Medicine courses of the PA curriculum. Open to entry-level PA students only.

    6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 514 - The Problem Oriented Medical Record-History and Physical Examination

    The course provides students with an organized, sequential approach to the history and physical examination. Students will be able to perform both complete and directed histories and physical examinations and accurately document their findings. Open to entry level PA students only.

    5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 516 - Problem Based Learning (PBL)

    Provides students with the opportunity to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills in a seminar, small group environment. Students will learn to connect the knowledge and attitudes developed in behavioral, basic and clinical science courses and apply it to patient care. Increases student capacity to seek and apply knowledge as individual problem solvers and members of a health care team. Open to entry level PA students only.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 518 - Medical Director Presentation Rounds

    Provides students with feedback on oral presentations derived from patient history and physical examinations completed by students. Evaluations are based on student's ability to critique an incomplete history and physical, identify issues that require further discussion in the HPI and physical exam, write a complete problem list, and document an assessment and plan. Open to entry level PA students only.

    .5 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 521 - Clinical Medicine I

    Focuses on mastery of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to construct a comprehensive patient database and management plan. Students are introduced to, and become proficient in, medical interviewing and performing a physical examination. Emphasizes the process of synthesizing data to formulate a diagnostic plan through learning activities such as lectures, small group process, problem based learning, case studies, and clinical skills laboratories. Teaches data gathering and recording in the problem oriented medical record format. The diagnostic process is taught in an organ systems (or medical subspecialty) approach. Students learn to recognize and manage physical and mental health problems. Students are encouraged to think critically as an integral part of developing a logical, sequential and humanistic approach to their patient responsibilities and mastering medical information. The ultimate goal of these clinical medicine courses is to insure that students are optimally prepared to participate in the delivery of high quality medical care in both an in-patient and out-patient setting. Prerequisites: HAP 504 and HBA 561 (minimum grade of C) Open to entry-level PA students only.

    5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 522 - Clinical Medicine II

    Focuses on mastery of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to construct a comprehensive patient database and management plan. Students are introduced to, and become proficient in, medical interviewing and performing a physical examination. Emphasizes the process of synthesizing data to formulate a diagnostic plan through learning activities such as lectures, small group process, problem based learning, case studies, and clinical skills laboratories. Data gathering and recording are taught in the problem oriented medical record format. The diagnostic process is taught in an organ systems (or medical subspecialty) approach. Students learn to both recognize and manage physical and mental health problems. Students are encouraged to think critically as an integral part of developing a logical, sequential and humanistic approach to their patient responsibilities and mastering medical information. The ultimate goal of these clinical medicine courses is to insure that students are optimally prepared to participate in the delivery of high quality medical care in both an in-patient and out-patient setting. Prerequisite: HAP 521 (minimum grade of B-). Open to entry-level PA students only.

    Prerequisite(s): HAP 521 (minimum grade of B-). Open to entry-level PA students only.7 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 523 - Clinical Medicine III

    Focuses on mastery of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to construct a comprehensive patient database and management plan. Students are introduced to, and become proficient in, medical interviewing and performing a physical examination. Emphasizes the process of synthesizing data to formulate a diagnostic plan through learning activities such as lectures, small group process, problem based learning, case studies, and clinical skills laboratories. Data gathering and recording are taught in the problem oriented medical record format. The diagnostic process is taught in an organ systems (or medical subspecialty) approach. Students learn to recognize and manage physical and mental health problems. Students are encouraged to think critically as an integral part of developing a logical, sequential and humanistic approach to their patient responsibilities and mastering medical information. The ultimate goal of these clinical medicine courses is to insure that students are optimally prepared to participate in the delivery of high quality medical care in both an in-patient and out-patient setting. Prerequisite: HAP 522 (minimum grade of B-). Open to entry-level PA students only.

    Prerequisite(s): HAP 522 (minimum grade of B-). Open to entry-level PA students only.6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 524 - Clinical Medicine IV

    Focuses on mastery of the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to construct a comprehensive patient database and management plan. Students become proficient in utilizing the history and physical information as they begin to synthesize data to formulate a diagnostic plan. This is emphasized through learning activities such as lectures, small group process, case studies, and clinical skills laboratories. The diagnostic process is taught in an organ systems approach. Students learn to both recognize and manage physical and mental health problems. Students are encouraged to think critically as an integral part of developing a logical, sequential and humanistic approach to their patient responsibilities and mastering medical information. Open to entry level PA students only. Prerequisite: HAP 523 (minimum grade of B-). Open to entry-level PA students only.

    Prerequisite(s): HAP 523 (minimum grade of B-). Open to entry-level PA students only.9 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 528 - Genitourinary, Sexual and Reproductive Health

    A comprehensive introduction to obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN), female and male genitourinary system (GU) and human sexuality. Students will learn about structures, function, evaluation and treatments of the various diseases and conditions. Open to entry level PA students only.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 532 - Diagnostic Imaging

    Provides an overview of common diagnostic imaging modalities and their indications, limitations, benefits and potential risks. Students learn how to utilize plain radiographs and other imaging studies in the diagnosis of disease with an emphasis on recognition of normal findings and their comparison to the abnormalities found in disease processes. Open to entry-level PA students only.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 534 - Introduction to Clinical Psychiatry

    Presents key principles of psychiatric evaluation and interviewing to include the mental status exam. Focuses on psychiatric problems seen in primary care, introduces the differential diagnosis and treatment of major psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, personality and mood disorders, psychosis, substance abuse, and somatoform disorders. Fosters an awareness of social patterns that exert an impact on mental functioning. Open to entry-level PA students only.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 538 - Clinical Aspects of Palliative Care

    Provides students with knowledge and skills relevant to the practice of hospice and palliative medicine. Involves care of patients at all stages of progressive disease, including symptom management, restoration and maintenance of quality of life. Focuses on patient-directed goals. Explores coordination of services and care, using a holistic, team-based model and communication tools. Open to any healthcare professional who has an interest or work experience in hospice and palliative medical care.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 539 - Hospice and Palliative Care Policy Issues

    Introduces healthcare professionals to policy issues and fundamental tools relevant to the delivery of hospice and palliative care. Addresses aging population; workforce issues; healthcare expenditures and reimbursements; and advancement of medical technology. Includes ethics, barriers to practice, and medical legal issues. Open to any healthcare professional who has an interest or work experience in hospice and palliative medical care.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 541 - Principles and Practices of Clinical Prevention and Population Health

    This course provides clinically practicing physician assistants an in-depth understanding of health promotion, disease prevention and population health and resources for utilization of this information in their clinical practices. The framework for the course consists of four components including evidence base for practice; clinical prevention services-health promotion; health systems and health policy; and community aspects of practice. Includes both individually-oriented and population-oriented preventative efforts, as well as interaction between the two. Students will be required to complete a health promotion or disease prevention project relevant to their community or clinical practice. Post-professional PA students only.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 545 - Ethics and Health Care for Physician Assistants

    Provides an overview of ethics in health care in a rapidly changing society. Teaches students to approach ethical dilemmas using theoretical frameworks and decision making processes. Explores ethical issues surrounding health care reform and public health policy and includes distribution of resources and rationing of services. Introduces students to the ethical perspectives of euthanasia, reproduction, transplants, genetics, research on human subjects, pediatrics, cloning, stem cells and mental health through case studies. Reviews classic cases in health care ethics and their shaping of health policy. Discusses patient education and the Physician Assistant professional codes of ethics and standards. Open to PA students only.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 549 - Clinical Skills for the Physician Assistant Student

    The clinical skills course provides the physician assistant student with an overview of common clinical procedural skills and their indications, limitations, benefits and potential risks. Students are taught how to perform a number of commonly performed clinical procedures.Open to entry level PA students only.

    1 credit, S/F graded

    HAP 551 - Research Design and Evidence-Based Medicine

    Provides students with basic knowledge and skills needed to formulate research questions and hypotheses, develop research protocols, critically evaluate and analyze scientific and medical journals, and to conduct computerized searches and literature reviews. Describes principals of Evidence-Based Medicine and emphasizes various types of clinical questions and tools available to answer them. By the end of this course, the student will choose a proposed topic for their capstone project. Open to entry-level PA students only.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 552 - Evidence Based Medicine: Evaluating and Applying Clinical Research

    Provides practicing PAs with the knowledge and skills to develop and evaluate clinical research questions, hypotheses, designs and protocols, and to critically evaulate and analyze scientific and medical journals. Students will learn to conduct computerized searches and literature reviews. Introduces the principles and practice of Evidence-Based Medicine, with emphasis on various types of clinical questions typically encountered in PA practice, and tools available to answer them. Course will focus on student areas of interest, and projects will be based on clinical cases encountered in the student's practice. Students will apply their knowledge of research and EBM by designing a clinical question and conducting and reporting on a thorough literature search on their topic of choice. Post-Professional PA students only.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 554 - Research Writing for Health Professionals

    This course prepares students to write and edit the components of research proposals and essays. Students will review required components for research proposals and practice writing and editing components and other assigned essays. Students will learn a six phase editing process to apply to their own writing and will learn to critique the writing of other students.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 556 - Teaching Strategies

    This course provides an overview of the principles associated with effective teaching. Students will combine theory and practice while developing teaching skills that promote learning and diversity within a variety of education settings. Topics emphasize the practical aspects of teaching and include teaching models, student learning styles, course objectives, learning outcomes evaluation, and classroom ethics. Students will be required to complete a final project that will be presented, discussed and evaluated in class. For post-professional PA students only or with permission of the Program Director.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 557 - Introduction to Clinical Informatics

    Introduces health care professionals to concepts surrounding clinical information systems and the practical applications of these concepts. Provides an overview of the Clinical Informatics field including definitions, theory, technologies, and workflows. Focuses on topics related to the delivery of health care within the realm of the electronic medical record systems, including policy, leadership, regulatory affairs and administration. Includes synchronous and asynchronous on-line learning activities.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 558 - Epidemiology

    Presents epidemiologic concepts used to study health and disease in populations. Provides information about the major causes of morbidity and mortality, including methods of measurement and data sources. Observational and experimental epidemiologic studies will be described and their advantages and disadvantages compared. Students will develop skills needed to critically review epidemiologic research studies published in peer-reviewed journals. Introduces various areas of epidemiologic study, including cancer, molecular/genetic, environmental, occupational, social and behavioral, and infectious disease/surveillance. For post-professional PA students only or permission of the Program Director.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 559 - Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Examines the theory, philosophy, and applications of complementary and integrative medicine within today's health care system. Presents many alternatives to traditional Western or allopathic medicine, and how these various models, systems and therapies impact the delivery of health care in the United States. Prepares students to best respond to consumers requests for information on the use of therapies. Emphasizes an evidence based approach and promotes awareness of clinical research currently done in these areas. Exposes various methods of access to resources and how to incorporate these approaches into clinical practices.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 561 - Master's Project I

    Students will work with a faculty mentor to develop a clinical question and perform an initial literature search on a topic of interest. Topics should be well-focused and may include psychological, economic or ethical issues in health care as well as diagnostic or treatment-related questions. Following review by a faculty mentor, the student will submit summaries of selected articles as well as a outline. Open to entry-level PA students only. Prerequisite: HAP 551

    Prerequisite(s): HAP 5511 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 562 - Masters Project II

    Students will work with their faculty mentor to refine a clinical question and revise the presentation outline and article summaries submitted at the end of HAP 561. Emphasis will be placed on thoroughness of the literature search and clarity of the presentation. By completion of this course, students should have the presentation in its final form, and have developed a draft of a final paper. Open to entry-level PA students only. Prerequisite: 561

    Prerequisite(s): 5611 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 563 - Masters Project III

    Students will revise the presentation submitted at the end of HAP 562 with input from their faculty mentor, who will guide them in developing a concise, professional-appearing product, suitable for presentation at a professional conference. Students will present this to the faculty and other members of the class, and will be evaluated on the content, visual, and oral components of their work. Students will also complete and submit their final paper. Open to entry-level PA students only. Prerequisite: HAP 562

    Prerequisite(s): HAP 5621 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 570 - Internal Medicine Clerkship

    Provides practical clinical experience in caring for adult hospitalized patients on a medical service. Strengthens the student's skills in developing a comprehensive database with regard to a wide variety of common inpatient medical problems, stressing mastery of cognitive and affective information that enables the student to recognize normal and assess deviation from normal, and effectively consult and refer. Exposure to out-patient care is often included. Students learn to address personal and social issues that influence the care of the medical patient. Prerequisite: Successful completion of preclinical year courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of preclinical year courses.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 571 - Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship

    Provides students with practical clinical experience in the differential diagnosis, evaluation, management, and consultation and referral for normal and abnormal conditions in obstetrics and gynecology. Students will gain skills in obtaining patient histories, physical diagnosis and medical decision making through exposure to a broad base of patients with a wide variety of personal and social issues that influence patient care. Prerequisite: Successful completion of preclinical year courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of preclinical year courses.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 572 - General Surgery Clerkship

    Provides students with practical clinical experience in the evaluation and management of surgical patients. Through exposure to a broad base of surgical patients, students will master the knowledge, attitudes and skills necessary to obtain focused patient histories and physical exams, construct a differential diagnosis, make sound medical decisions, and effectively consult and refer. Students will learn to address a variety of personal and social issues that influence the care of the surgical patient. Prerequisite: Successful completion of preclinical year courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of preclinical year courses.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 574 - Emergency Medicine Clerkship

    Provides students with practical clinical experience in the medical care of acutely ill or injured patients. Students will enhance skills in obtaining focused patient histories, performing focused physical examinations, mastering emergency medical management and decision making, and effective consultation and referral. Emphasis is placed on student recognition of life threatening situations and the response to such situations. Students will learn to address a wide variety of personal and social issues that influence the care of the emergency medical patient. Prerequisite: Successful completion of preclinical year courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of preclinical year courses.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 575 - Psychiatry Clerkship

    Provides students with practical experience in the recognition, evaluation and management of patients with mental illness. Through clinical interaction with mental health patients and workers, students will develop an understanding of the biological and psychosocial factors that influence a variety of psychiatric conditions, and effectively consult with other professionals and refer patients to the support services that are required to optimize the care of the psychiatric patient. Students will learn to address a wide variety of personal and social issues that influence the care of this patient population. Prerequisite: Successful completion of preclinical year courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of preclinical year courses.4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 576 - Medicine Preceptorship

    Provides students with practical clinical experience working with the ambulatory medical patient. This preceptorship augments and develops directed data collection skills emphasizing a wide range of primary care medical problems and their management. Cognitive and affective skills that enable the student to recognize normal and assess abnormal findings and effectively consult and refer are a key aspect of learning during this experience. Students will learn to address a wide variety of personal and social issues that influence the care of the medical patient. Prerequisite: Successful completion of preclinical year courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of preclinical year courses.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 577 - Pediatric Preceptorship

    Provides students with practical clinical experience working with ambulatory pediatric patients. Through exposure to a wide variety of primary care pediatric problems, students will develop directed data collection and patient management skills and learn how to effectively consult and refer. The preceptorship stresses those cognitive and affective skills that enable the student to recognize normal findings and assess abnormal findings. Students will learn to address a wide variety of personal and social issues that influence the care of the pediatric patient.

    5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 579 - Geriatrics Clerkship

    Provides students with practical clinical experience in working with elderly patients. Augments and strengthens students' skills in developing a thorough database and enhances student understanding of when to request a consultation or make a referral. Students work with a wide variety of common geriatric problems and learn how to appropriately modify their management approach to the indications, limitations, and methodology of diagnostic procedures and therapeutic regimens in the elderly. Students will also learn to address a wide variety of personal and social issues that influence the care of the geriatric patient. Prerequisite: Successful completion of preclinical year courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of preclinical year courses.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 580 - Orthopedic Clerkship

    Provides students with practical experience in the care of patients with musculoskeletal disorders and acute injuries in the primary care setting. Students will develop the knowledge, attitudes and skills necessary to obtain directed patient histories, perform focused physical exams, make sound clinical decisions, and effectively consult and refer through exposure to patients with a wide variety of orthopedic problems. Students will learn to address a wide variety of personal and social issues that influence the care of the orthopedic patient. Prerequisite: Successful completion of preclinical year courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of preclinical year courses.4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 581 - Clinical Elective

    Provides students with the opportunity to explore an area of medical or surgical practice beyond basic required rotations. Students are encouraged to choose an area of emerging importance in health care and PA practice and/or a potential employment setting. This elective clerkship further augments and develops patient management skills in the chosen medical or surgical discipline and must be selected in consultation with the student's program faculty advisor. Students will learn to address a wide variety of personal and social issues that influence the care of many patients. Prerequisite: Successful completion of preclinical year courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of preclinical year courses.4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAP 588 - Practicum

    Provides post-professional Physician Assistant students opportunities to apply theories and skills learned in the program. A limited number of students are allowed to develop a practicum project that is uniquely designed to meet his/her needs. Students will plan and implement a project within one of the following areas: 1.) research, 2.) administration and management, 3.)education, 4.)leadership/professional development, or 5.) professional writing. Acceptable projects must include design, implementation and analysis phases as well as a bibliography. Projects are approved by the Program Director and a mentor is assigned to assist in the development of a practicum proposal. Enrollment requires permission of the Program Director. The course may be repeated once.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 190 - Introduction to the Health Professions

    Presents topics of interest to students considering careers as health professionals. Introduces the student to basic concepts of health, factors influencing health care, health care settings, and selected health professions. May not be taken for credit in addition to LHW 102. Open to west campus students.

    1 credit

    HAS 300 - Issues in Health Care

    Examines major issues influencing health care delivery. Emphasizes analysis of significance of these issues to the health professions. Covers organization of the delivery system, professional roles, quality control, cost controls, health agencies and alternative delivery models, consumer life-styles, and health statistics. Integrates current trends in managed care, reimbursement, health policy and reform. Discusses infectious disease and nutrition. Allows for discipline-specific program development and implementation through HSC outreach efforts.

    2 credits

    HAS 332 - Management Concepts for Health Professionals

    Addresses the operations within healthcare institutions from macro to micro levels of management. Analyzes the philosophy and significant occurrences affecting healthcare operations in the past, present and future. The divisions within healthcare operations (clinical, support and informational services, nursing, finance and ambulatory care) will address the following aspects of management: financial forecasting and monitoring, staffing, employee productivity and morale, customer service, cost containment, decision making and total quality management. Emphasizes hospital operations and presents nursing home and community healthcare center operations. Open to CLS and RC students only.

    1 credit

    HAS 335 - Medical Ethics

    Introduces health professional students to basic concepts and challenges in medical ethics. Uses a framework and decision-making process to help students learn how to approach ethical dilemmas. Explores current topics in health care ethics including advance directives, assisted dying, genetics, cloning, transplants, confidentiality, informed consent, and professional conduct.

    1 credit

    HAS 350 - Introduction to Statistics

    Discusses elements of biostatistics, graphs and tables, descriptive statistics, probability, populations of samples, normal distribution, hypothesis testing, and computers.

    2 credits

    HAS 351 - Research Literacy/Research Design

    Prepares students to perform a literature search in their respective disciplines to find scientific and health articles and books in the Health Sciences Center Library. Presents research terminology, methods, and design. Provides basic skills to enhance interpretation, evaluation and analysis of research articles, including the hypothesis, literature review, design, methodology, and data analysis.

    1 credit

    HAS 355 - Integrative Systems Physiology

    Introduces students to human integrative systems physiology. Includes exposure to physiological control systems, emphasizes in detail each organ system and how homeostasis is maintained. Includes membrane, muscle, central and peripheral nervous system, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, and endocrine physiology. Presents material and incorporates select examples of pathophysiology to emphasize relevance of material. Students will solidify an understanding of the structures and functions across all systems in the human body under normal conditions and select pathophysiology.

    4 credits

    HAS 363 - Computer Literacy for Health Professionals

    Surveys the uses of computers for health practitioners. Offers practical experience in literature database searching and use of applications software.

    1 credit

    HAS 391 - Readings in Health

    Supplementary specialized readings under faculty supervision. Topics determined by mutual agreement between undergraduate student and faculty and must have the approval of the program director in the School of Health Technology and Management prior to registration.

    1-3 credits

    HAS 399 - Independent Study in Health

    A special project involving advanced readings, reports, discussions, research, or special course work on topics or problems of the student's choosing, with the guidance of an assigned faculty member. Projects must have the approval of the program director in the School of Health Technology and Management prior to registration.

    1-6 credits

    HAS 490 - Research Tutorial

    An original research project is conducted. Prerequisite: HAS 351

    Prerequisite(s): HAS 3512 credits

    HAS 503 - Issues, Trends and Challenges in Nutrition

    Analyzes and integrates current trends and issues in food and nutrition. Evaluates complementary and alternative forms of medical nutrition therapy, functional foods and nutraceuticals. Examines evidence regarding efficacy, safety and cost of new products. Discusses applications in practical professional settings.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 504 - Survey of Nutrition Practices

    Prepares students to function effectively in area of nutrition in public health, food service, and health care settings. Emphasizes critical thinking skills, problem solving, continuous quality improvement processes, and management techniques. Fosters skill development through case studies, problem based learning scenarios, and simulations.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 506 - Food Nutrition Policies: Cultural, Behavioral, Social Aspects

    Introduces health care professionals to existing food and nutrition policies, the types of data that these policies are based on and the process by which they are developed. Offers skills needed to critically analyze the process and resulting policies, and those used in developing new policies and securing funds for such projects.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 507 - Fundamentals of Nutrition Policy and Management

    This course is designed for nutritionists who want to develop effective management skills in the food service and clinical areas with an emphasis placed on clinical dietetics. Case studies, problem-based learning scenarios, and role-playing scenarios will complement lectures and provide students with an opportunity to problem solve and apply information acquired. Personnel issues, cost containment and management principles pertinent to clinical and food service functions will be discussed and applied to real life situations. Reviews safety and sanitation procedures with practical applications. The survey process and accreditation standards will be covered.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 513 - Health Care and Older People

    Course is designed to maximize a student's understanding of policy and administrative issues in delivering health care to older people. Highlights examples of policy directions on the national, state and local levels and the practical application of administrative tools in managing health facilities mandated for older people.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 516 - Health and the Aging Process

    An overview of information and issues pertinent to physical and psychosocial health of aging Americans. Includes demographics, attitudes, physiological and psychological changes, health promotion, disease prevention, health care delivery settings, and ethical and legal issues.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 518 - Women and Health Care

    This course provides an overview of women as users and providers of health care in the United States. Attention is given to women as active participants in their health care today as compared to historical times when women were encouraged to be passive. Throughout the course, case studies are introduced to demonstrate the contemporary utilization patterns of health care by women, including the use of managed care companies, women's public health agencies and grassroots health organizations. In addition, a number of issues are addressed regarding the role of women in providing health care, specifically from a public health management perspective. The course includes examples and presentations of national and regional women's health concerns, such as breast cancer, reproductive choices, heart disease, tobacco use, menopause-related issues, and domestic violence. Special populations are also discussed as they relate to women and health care, including adolescents, older women, homeless women, working women, caretaking women and middle-class uninsured women. Traditional and alternative health care strategies are offered as acceptable methods for meeting the growing and changing needs of women presently and in the future.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 521 - Disability and Health Promotion

    Examines the life experiences of people with disabilities from a disability studies perspective. Includes a study of the history, sociology, and psychology of disability, and looks at interactions between people with disabilities and health care providers in terms of miscommunication, prejudice, communication, and health promotion. Explores the larger systems that can help or hinder health promotion including structural barriers of poverty, lack of insurance, inaccessibility of services, architectural barriers and lack of transportation. Addresses particular health care challenges faced by women and ethnic, racial, and sexual minorities who have disabilities.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 525 - Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Examines the theory, philosophy and applications of complementary and alternative medicine within today's health care system. Presents the many alternatives to traditional Western or allopathic medicine, and how these various models, systems and therapies impact on the delivery of health care in the United States. Addresses skills needed to best respond to consumers' requests for information about these approaches. Students will examine the current body of research available on complementary and alternative medicine and be introduced to the vast array of resources available, the type of training involved in license/certification, and how to incorporate these approaches into their clinical practices. This course will combine lecture, readings, speakers, independent research and some expediential, hands-on work.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 526 - Community Mental Health Programs

    Provides a critical examination of the mental health system as it has evolved in the United States. Focuses on the service delivery system: how it has developed, what it is today and where it is going. Deals with the mental health system as a business: how it operates, how it is funded, who it employs and how it will develop in the new managed care environment.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 527 - Principles and Practice of Public and Community Health

    Provides an overview of the public health system, the philosophy and purpose of public and community health, the managerial and educational aspects of public health programs, how the public health sector responds to disease prevention, environmental issues, community public health provisions and other core public and community health components. The impact of federal health care reform on the public health delivery system and the economic and fiscal implications of the system on state and local governments will be discussed. Students will analyze the critical elements of a health care system.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 528 - Long Island's Community Health

    Provides students with an overview of community health concerns of Long Island and information and resources for addressing them. Presents conditions that are associated with special populations such as the Native Americans, baymen, homeless, migrant workers, rural residents, urban residents, and the uninsured middle-income residents. Community health problems with high incidence on Long Island including breast cancer, Lyme disease, AIDS, and tuberculosis will be covered. Reviews Long Island's environmental health problems with special emphasis on those associated with drinking and swimming water, agriculture, pesticides, and transportation. Discusses and presents the community health care delivery system and model programs and resources.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 529 - Community Health and Patient Education

    Provides information on current trends in patient education program development. Emphasizes techniques used by health professionals in planning, implementing and evaluating patient education programs in hospitals and other health care organizations concerned with the educational component of patient care.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 530 - Health Care Operations

    Addresses the operations within health care institutions from the macro to the micro levels of management. Analyzes philosophy and significant occurrences affecting health care operations in the past, present, and future. Divisions within health care operations (clinical, support and informational services, nursing, finance, and ambulatory care) will address the following aspects of management: financial forecasting and monitoring, staffing, employee productivity and morale, customer service, cost containment, decision making, total quality management, and managed care. Emphasizes hospital operations, and presents nursing home and community health care center operations.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 531 - Health Care Delivery Systems

    Provides overview of health care delivery enterprise in the United States and the various forces that shape this enterprise. Discusses dynamics of care, evolving public and private regulations and guidelines ,and rapid technological advances.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 533 - Communication and Group Dynamics

    Assists students in understanding and improving interpersonal communication skills through structured exercises in speaking, writing and interacting. Emphasizes leadership skills in group interactions especially in the health care fields.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 534 - Fundamentals of Health Care Management

    Provides students with a realistic knowledge of management, not only the theories and techniques, but the ways in which they are worked out in practice. Emphasizes the essentials of management pertinent to practicing managers, e.g., organizational profiles, political and power relationships, planning, organizing, staffing, directing, leading, controlling and evaluating. Looks at essentials as a system interacting with the manager's total environment - economic, technological, social, political and ethical.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 535 - Essentials of Health Care Finance

    The course is designed to introduce the student to those types of financial decisions that health care executives are most likely to be involved with, and to provide material that will help them understand the conceptual basis and mechanics of financial analysis and decision-making as it pertains to health care.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 536 - Health Law

    Acquaints students with the general applicability of law to the health field and the health delivery system. Covers specific areas of laws (including statutory law, common law and rules and regulations) applicable to and controlling the operation of hospitals, long-term care facilities, medical practices, health professional practices and other institutions and individuals involved in the delivery of health care. Identifies legal problems affecting the delivery of health care and addresses problems encountered by institutions and individuals.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 538 - Health Economics and Public Policy

    Presents an in-depth analysis of the effects of economic principles on health care and the effect of health policy and economic forces on the health care delivery system. Examines the ways in which these concepts may be used to analyze health policy and improve the delivery of health care services. The effect of changes in market forces, human resources needs, formation of integrated delivery systems, health promotion initiatives and the impact of technology will be studied.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 539 - Strategic Planning for Health Programs, Facilities and Networks

    Conveys to prospective and current health program managers the fundamentals of strategic thinking and planning and the integration of these processes into executive management functions. Prepares prospective and current managers to fulfill their roles and responsibilities within a dynamic, changing medical marketplace where health care entities are undergoing a major paradigm shift, changing from independent organizations that provide illness-focused episodic care to networks and systems of entities that address the health care needs of populations over entire lifetimes.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 541 - Strategic Management in Health Care

    Designed for health services organization managers. Provides exposure to varied theories of oganization and management to prepare students to predict and explain organizational and managerial actions and responses relative to public policy. Readings focus on four major themes: organization/environment relationships, organization complexity, strategic management, and the significance of economic theory in understanding organization and systems behavior.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 542 - The Impact of the Political Setting on Health Policy and Management

    Examines the influences and effects of politics on the implementation of health policy at federal, state and local levels of government. Analyzes the roles and consequences of various governmental and social entities involved in policy implementation including structure and process. Reviews outcomes of selected public policies within the legislative or administrative context.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 543 - Health Policy

    Provides students with an overview of health care policy making principles. Specific policy formats will be analyzed using examples of local and national policies. Students will learn to develop selective health policies using case studies.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 544 - Principles of Managed Care

    Provides an in-depth understanding of the meaning of managed care in the context of the United States health care system. Reviews the history, components and various organizational forms of managed care systems. Potential benefits, inherent limitations, and the legal, social and ethical implications of managed care as a health care delivery system will be discussed.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 545 - Ethics and Health Care

    Provides an overview of ethics in health care in a rapidly changing society. Teaches students to approach ethical dilemmas using theoretical frameworks and decision making processes. Explores ethical issues surrounding health care reform and public health policy and includes distribution of resources and rationing of services. Introduces students to the ethical perspectives of euthanasia, reproduction, transplants, and HIV/AIDS through case studies. Reviews classic cases in health care ethics and their shaping of health policy. Discusses patient education and professional codes of ethics and standards. Cannot receive credit for this course and HAP 545 or HAY 545.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 546 - Stem Cells and Society

    Provides a multifaceted and interdisciplinary look at issues surrounding stem cell research, taking into consideration the basic science, history, public policy (both federal and state), economics, and ethics. Students will gain an understanding of how each of these disciplines affects the complete issue. Presents the basic fundamental concepts underlying the research, what factors characterize different types of stem cells (adult, embryonic, ips) and how they pertain to a quest for disease cures. Investigates policies and legislative underpinnings of stem cell research that have shaped the course of stem cell research in the United States. Explores the ethical concerns surrounding stem cell research and the related impact on policy.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 547 - Grantsmanship in the Health Professions

    Introduces the grantsmanship process, in both federal and private domains. Focuses on research, design, preparation, and submission of grant applications.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 550 - Statistics and Data Analysis

    Teaches the use of descriptive statistics such as means, medians, standard deviations and histograms to report results of experiments. Illustrates how inferences can be made from hypothesis testing and regression analysis. Includes analysis of the validity and appropriateness of statistical techniques employed by researchers in the health field.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 551 - Research Design and Proposal Writing

    This course is designed to acquaint students with the research and proposal writing process in preparation for a practicum or research project, including: identifying a problem within an area of health care management, policy, and/or practice; formulating a research question or hypothesis; reviewing and critically appraising relevant literature; designing a realistic study and selecting appropriate scientific methods to answer the proposed question (or test the hypothesis); articulating the major strengths and limitations of the proposed study; considering expected results and potential impact of study findings on health care management, policy, and/or practice; and communicating the proposal in a well-referenced and clearly written plan. Prerequisite: HAS 550

    Prerequisite(s): HAS 5503 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 553 - Research Methods and Design

    Presents process and skills needed to develop a research study, formulate a research question or hypothesis, conduct literature searches, use library resources, critically appraise scientific literature, select an appropriate research design and methods for data collection, and consider the protection of human subjects and health information, including policies and procedures of the Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CORIHS). Prerequisite: HAS 550. Permission of instructor required. Cannot receive credit for this course and HAS 551.

    Prerequisite(s): HAS 550. Permission of instructor required. Cannot receive credit for this course and HAS 551.3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 554 - Marketing in Health Services

    Provides an introductory explanation of marketing as a requisite component of modern business. While presenting the basic principles and general philosophies of marketing, the course concentrates on the importance of marketing in health care service delivery in a managed care environment.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 555 - Essentials of Health Care Sales and Marketing

    Introduces strategic selling methodology and looks at the health care buying decision. Focuses on the health care customer's needs, both organizational and personal. The resultant analysis will allow the student to better determine how to add value to the health care customer's organization and create a long-term business relationship that benefits all parties. Focuses on the key principles, methodologies and strategies of marketing, and expands these basic concepts to include an analysis of the health care value chain: trading relationships between the producers (manufacturers) of the health care products, purchasers of those products (groups purchasing organizations, wholesalers/distributors), and health care providers (hospital customers) that are end users of these products.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 556 - Foundations of Health Care Quality Management

    Introduces health care quality management methodologies and examines their impact on health care productivity, quality, and patient safety. Utilizes concepts of performance improvement and continuous process improvement to improve product and service quality and competitiveness. Presents history of quality improvement in health care and application of quality concepts to improve clinical outcomes, patient safety, patient satisfaction, financial outcomes, and employee and physician satisfaction.Emphasizes importance of data usage to monitor performance improvement activities.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 557 - Planning and Implementing Community Health Programs

    Prepares students to conduct needs assessments of various diverse populations and to plan, implement and evaluate programs to meet the needs. Plans include detailed goals, behavioral objectives, methods, resource and budget allocation, including grant and contract considerations.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 558 - Epidemiology and Health Policy

    Presents the concepts, principles and applications of epidemiology through the use of public health case studies. Examines the distributions and determinants of disease, human morbidity and mortality, the characteristics of populations and the biological bases of health and disease. Prerequisite: HAS 550

    Prerequisite(s): HAS 5503 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 560 - Evaluation of Community Health Initiatives

    Prepares students to plan, implement, and utilize an evaluation of a community health initiative. Addresses basic principles and practices of evaluation, including identifying goals of a community health initiative; designing an evaluation plan that can determine if the initiative's goals are achieved; implementing an evaluation plan; interacting with stakeholders; and using evaluation results to improve performance. Students are required to design an evaluation component for the community health program developed in HAS 557.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 563 - Computer Case Studies in Health Care Management

    Examines problem solving in health care management through the application of personal computers and case studies. Prerequisite: Knowledge of spreadsheets

    Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of spreadsheets3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 564 - Health Information and Communication Systems

    Couse acquaints students with the types of information systems available in health care and their applications to health care delivery. Includes an overview of various health care networks, patient centered information systems, and imaging systems. Reviews system platforms, electronic medical records and computer assisted instruction. Students discuss the integration of health information systems with communication systems such as E-mail, fax, pagers and wireless telephones. Through the use of classroom demonstrations and site visits, students gain hands-on experience with several health related information and communication systems.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 568 - HIV/AIDS: A Continuing Societal Challenge

    Examines the social, psychological and medical issues of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in relation to the concerns of educators. Explores and assesses how personal values and attitudes impact on the delivery of educational programs.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 570 - Business Aspects of Managed Care

    Introduces the students to and expands on their knowledge base of the business and financial aspects of the managed care delivery system. Trends in the financing of health care will be explored, as well as the practical application of developing and writing a formal business plan.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 571 - Issues in Health Care Management

    The course is designed to introduce the student to current trends in the United States health care system, including trends in medical-legal issues, labor relations, cost accounting and managed care. Models of progressive programs and health care delivery systems will be reviewed and discussed.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 572 - Ambulatory Care Management

    Familiarizes the student with areas of ambulatory care management. Identifies national and local trends and practical applications needed to administer outpatient care programs and facilities.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 573 - Statistical Process Control for Health Care Quality Management

    Teaches health care management professional how to incorporate quantitative performance measurement into daily work routines to form the foundation for quality improvement-oriented culture. Provides strategies to gather and analyze data needed to plan, implement, monitor, and evaluate health care quality improvement initiatives. Prerequisites: HAS 556 and HAS 550 (with minimum grades of B).

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 574 - Group Practice Management

    Introduces the student to the practices and theories of Group/Physician Practice Management. Provides fundamental understanding of the financial and regulatory issues that influence todays medical practice. Presents issues such as leadership, operations, compensation, and clinical productivity for review.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 575 - Long Term Care

    Enhances the student's understanding of health care options for the elderly, the existing system of long term care delivery and particularly, the administrative aspects of operating a nursing home. The course will include actual exposure to clinical and operational departments in a nursing home and their roles in the interdisciplinary process. It will also include a review of the rules and regulations governing nursing homes in New York State and the financial implications and reimbursement methodologies that impact upon them.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 576 - Workplace 2020

    Provides an overview of issues affecting the American workplace in the future through the year 2020. Expected working conditions, human resources, schedules and technology are explored as students learn how to plan for advances and changes in the health system. Through the use of case studies, introduces students to early experiments in organizational evolution and resulting applications to the health care environment. Discusses issues related to diversity, team building and employee education.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 577 - e-Healthcare: e-Commerce and e-Care

    Introduces students to e-trends and their impact on healthcare. Revisits the traditional models of healthcare delivery and disease management. Introduces students to the evolution of e-care models. Addresses the use of the Web in healthcare organizations, hospitals, medical offices and pharmaceutical companies. Includes e-business strategies, planning and development, e-health and law concepts related to e-services in healthcare.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 578 - Leadership in Health Care

    Focuses on the future role of the leader in the emerging society of organizations. Draws on lessons learned from the past, in both theory and practice. Examines the impact of leadership on the future quality of life, business, learning institutions and society. Defines difference between management and leadership skills and strategies for balancing and developing each skill set.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 579 - Advanced Seminar in Health Policy , Persuasion and Communication

    Analyzes the principle of health policy-making. The goal of the session is a complete health policy statement/paper deliverable to the appropriate policy-maker/legislator. Students will have round table discussions about general public health topics and develop their own health policy project.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 583 - Scientific Writing for Thesis and Publication

    Provides basic skills and information to plan, research and execute the writing of a scientific abstract, thesis outline, research proposal and develop current literature and raw data into a form for written presentation to support or refute a hypothesis. Focuses on scholarly writing and deductive logic, through the use of scientific data (whether from the literature or the research data book) to support an argument. Permission of instructor required.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 584 - Practicum: Community Health Education

    Open only to degree candidates in the community health planning and education track. Allows student to test, under supervised circumstances, his or her ability to apply knowledge learned in courses to the health care field.

    1-6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 586 - Practicum: Health Professions Management

    Open only to degree candidates in the management track. Allows student to apply theory learned while functioning as a manager in health practice.

    1-6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 588 - Practicum: Health Policy

    Open only to degree candidates in the research track. Allows student to apply and demonstrate knowledge of research methodology by either conducting or participating in a major research effort under the supervision of an experienced researcher.

    1-6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 590 - Independent Study

    Independent study proposals in health sciences. Must have the approval of the Research and Directed Study Committee of the School of Health Technology and Management prior to registration.

    1-6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 591 - Independent Readings

    Supplementary specialized readings for graduate students under faculty supervision. Topics include but are not limited to: community and public health, mental health, health policy, health care management, health care ethics, gerontology, patient education and health economics and policy. Approval must be obtained from the Research and Directed Study Committee of the School of Health Technology and Management prior to registration.

    1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 592 - Special Topics

    Presents a comprehensive look at specific aspects of health policy from all relevant perspectives. Synergizes scientific, legislative and ethical points of view and how their relationship to policy formulation and implementation. Students will expand skills to effectively articulate details of the policy and develop an educated position on it. Dynamic discussion, essay writing and debate will be utilized to gauge information comprehension and opinion development.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 598 - Thesis Seminar

    Complements thesis research. Includes presentation by degree candidate of research purpose, methodology and findings and culminates in presentation and discussion of final results.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAS 599 - Thesis Supervision

    Topic, statement of intent, and thesis committee membership must be approved prior to registration.

    4-6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAT 210 - Introduction to Respiratory Care

    Provides an introduction to the science of respiratory care, sleep technology, and cardiac care. Examines current trends in professional practice.Offers each student the opportunity to research and present a topic concerning the contemporary practice of a respiratory therapist, polysomnographic technologist, or cardiovascular technologist. Designed for lower-division four year respiratory care and polysomnographic technology majors. This course is not eligible for the G/P/NC option. Open to west campus students.

    1 credit

    HAT 304 - Cardiopulmonary Physiology

    Presents a detailed study of the physiology of human respiration and circulation. Topics include functional cardiopulmonary anatomy, embryology, ventilation, diffusion, blood flow, gas transport, acid-base states, mechanics and regulation of ventilation and basic cardiac function.

    4 credits

    HAT 306 - Patient Evaluation

    Provides concept of data base, historical information, medical terminology, chief complaint and present illness, and chest physical examination. Applies problem based learning to the study of clinical assessment skills.

    2 credits

    HAT 309 - Communication Skills for Health Care Professionals

    Provide the student with an understanding of the importance of effective communication by a health care professional. Through lecture, discussion, and role playing, in large and small groups, students will learn appropriate verbal, non-verbal, and written communication skills to improve interactions with patients, families, various members of the health care team, and the greater community.

    2 credits

    HAT 315 - Pharmacology

    Covers the basic principles that govern the use of drugs in the clinical practice of Respiratory Therapists and Sleep Technologists. Develops specific knowledge for classes of drugs, important distinctions among members of each class, and both their relation to the organ systems they affect and the diseases they treat, including drug dosages and calculations.

    4 credits

    HAT 320 - Cardiovascular Diagnosis and Treatment I

    Provides the basic cardiac function, practical skills of electrocardiography, diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias, cardiac medications and noninvasive cardiac diagnostic techniques. Examines theory and practical applications of electrocardiography, exercise stress testing, and Holter monitoring. Includes in-depth study of cardiac anatomy and electrophysiology. Prerequisite: HAT 304

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 3043 credits

    HAT 330 - Pulmonary Pathology

    A comprehensive study of the etiology, diagnosis, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, treatment, and prognosis of various types of pulmonary pathologies. Prerequisite: HAT 304

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 3043 credits

    HAT 331 - Respiratory Care Techniques I

    Introduces the history and global significance of the practice of respiratory care, including the beginning skills and therapies that are utilized. Major topics include the global history that led to the creation of the profession; the global need to provide quality respiratory care; principles of infection prevention and control; a review of the basic physics of respiratory care; medical gas storage, delivery and therapy; humidity and bland aerosol administration; bedside monitoring; and lung expansion and airway clearance therapies. Laboratory sessions will provide practical experience in the clinical application of the therapeutic modalities discussed.

    3 credits

    HAT 332 - Respiratory Care Techniques II

    Course is second in a four part sequence. Continues the review of basic therapeutic modalities of respiratory care. Major topics include drug aerosol therapy, airway pharmacology, airway management, and blood gases. Emphasizes the clinical use of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, alternative site care, and disease and disaster management. Prerequisitie: HAT 331

    3 credits

    HAT 333 - Pulmonary Diagnostic Techniques

    Provides the basic technical skills of pulmonary function testing, including an introduction to the instrumentation and physical principles of clinical measurement; procedures for measuring the lung functions of ventilation, mechanics, diffusion, gas distribution and exchange; and interpretation of tests results and their relation to various pathophysiologies. Prerequisite: HAT 304

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 3043 credits

    HAT 335 - Medical Ethics

    Reviews professional guidelines for ethical conduct and approaches to ethical dilemmas for respiratory therapists and polysomnographic technologists. Explores ethical issues including the distribution of resources and rationing of services. Examines health care services in the United States and the rights of the U.S. citizen under federal and state health care laws. Discusses physician assisted suicide; terminal weaning; brain death; genetics; cloning and euthanasia; advance directives; confidentiality; informed consent; patient rights; professional conduct; and the legal issues that impact healthcare practice in the United States.

    2 credits

    HAT 340 - Cardiovascular Clinical

    Provides clinical practice in cardiovascular technology, including both invasive and noninvasive techniques. Students will be introduced to clinical EKG's, Holter scanning, stress testing, and general noninvasive cardiography. Prerequisite: HAT 320

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 3202 credits

    HAT 350 - Basic Respiratory Care Clinical

    An introduction to the clinical application of basic respiratory procedures such as oxygen administration, aerosol therapy, positive airway pressure therapy, arterial punctures and other monitoring and diagnostic procedures. Prerequisite: HAT 331 and HAT 332

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 331 and HAT 3324 credits

    HAT 353 - Pulmonary Diagnostic Clinical

    Clinical application of spirometry, diffusion studies, blood gas analysis, flow volume loops, body plethysmography, helium dilution, nitrogen washouts, and bronchodilator responses. Prerequisite:HAT 333

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 3332 credits

    HAT 410 - Introduction to Clinical Education

    Introduces clinical teaching to senior students. Modalities include the decision making process, teaching strategies, classroom management, instructional design, and formative and summative evaluation.

    2 credits

    HAT 411 - Clinical Teaching in Respiratory Care

    An extension of HAT 410. Develops skills for senior students to conduct clinical teaching strategies under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: HAT 410

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 4104 credits

    HAT 415 - Respiratory Care Techniques IV

    Introduces advanced concepts, equipment and procedures used in adult, pediatric and neonatal critical care. Provides students with decision making skills for initiation and management of advanced ventilator technology. Explores functions, clinical applications and troubleshooting of selected advanced instrumentation. Reviews equipment limitations, quality assurance, equipment maintenance and cost/benefit analysis where applicable. Prerequisites: HAT 320, HAT 332, HAT 420, HAT 431 and HAT 432

    2 credits

    HAT 420 - Cardiovascular Diagnosis and Treatment II

    Examines the theory and practical applications of invasive physiologic monitoring, including metabolic and hemodynamic monitoring, Swan-Ganz catheterization, cardiac output measurement and aseptic technique. Also contains an in depth study of the etiology, pathology and treatment of advanced cardiac disease, including congenital heart disease. Prerequisite: HAT 320

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 3203 credits

    HAT 431 - Respiratory Care Techniques III

    Introduces the concepts of advanced airway management and mechanical ventilation used in the respiratory support of the critically ill patient. Emphasizes the physiological basis for ventilator use, indications for ventilation, parameters monitored during ventilation, and ventilator design, function and clinical application. Prerequisite: Admission to upper division Respiratory Care Program; HAT 332

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to upper division Respiratory Care Program; HAT 3324 credits

    HAT 432 - Perinatal Respiratory Care

    Examines anatomy, physiology, and pathology relating to management of the neonatal/pediatric patient. Includes analysis of neonatal and pediatric ventilator function in terms of mechanics and suitability in clinical application. Gives students the knowledge and skills needed to perform neonatal resuscitation. Prerequisite: HAT 332

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 3324 credits

    HAT 450 - Critical Care Clinical

    Develops clinical skills in the management of the critical care patient. Includes specialized learning experiences in therapeutic modalities, mechanical ventilation, cardiovascular monitoring and home care ventilation. Prerequisites: HAT 350, HAT 431

    5 credits

    HAT 451 - Perinatal Care Clinical

    Develops clinical skills in the management of pediatric and neonatal critical care patients. Includes specialized learning experiences in therapeutic modalities, mechanical ventilation, and emphasizes specific technical procedures that differ from the adult patient. Prerequisite: HAT 432

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 4324 credits

    HAT 470 - Polysomnographic Technology I

    Designed to provide entry-level personnel with both didactic and laboratory training in polysomnographic technology. Presents medical terminology, instrumentation setup and calibration, recording and monitoring techniques, documentation, professional issues and patient-technologist interactions. Lab sessions will provide practical experience in the skills required of an entry-level polysomnographic technologist. Prerequisites: HAT 331

    3 credits

    HAT 471 - Polysomnographic Technology II

    Provides training in more advanced aspects of polysomnographic technology. Students become familiar with the skills and knowledge needed to obtain and evaluate high quality sleep recordings. Covers all the aspects of sleep scoring and event recognition, recording and monitoring techniques, documentation, professional issues, therapeutic interventions, and patient-technologist interactions related to polysomnographic technology. Prerequisite: HAT 470

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 4702 credits

    HAT 475 - Polysomnographic Technology I Clinical

    Provides clinical training in the basics of polysomnographic technology. Familiarizes students with instrumentation setup and calibration, recording and monitoring techniques, documentation, professional issues, and patient-technologist interactions related to polysomnographic technology. Provides patient contact in a sleep lab. Presents opportunity to observe, perform (under supervision) and evaluate sleep studies. Prerequisite: HAT 470

    Prerequisite(s): HAT 4702 credits

    HAT 476 - Polysomnographic Technology II Clinical

    Provides clinical training in advanced aspects of polysomnographic technology. Familiarizes students with practical aspects of therapeutic intervention, sleep scoring equipment troubleshooting and artifact recognition. Prerequisites: HAT 470; HAT 471 and HAT 475

    2 credits

    HAT 482 - Physiologic Monitoring Clinical

    Provides a clinical experience in the hemodynamic and metabolic monitoring of patients in critical care units/labs. Covers invasive diagnostic cardiovascular procedures, including cardiac catheterization, intra-arterial pressure monitoring, and indwelling arterial catheter insertion and monitoring. Prerequisites: HAT 420, HAT 431

    2 credits

    HAT 487 - Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Clinical

    A clinical experience concentrating on program planning and evaluation of patients with chronic cardiopulmonary disorders. Includes discharge planning, rehabilitative services, stress testing, graded exercise and other supportive techniques. Prerequisites: HAT 320 and HAT 332

    2 credits

    HAT 490 - Independent Study

    Proposals for independent study in respiratory care must be submitted through the program director to the Committee on Research and Directed Study for approval prior to registration for this course.

    1-6 credits

    HAT 494 - Respiratory Care Board Review

    A practical discussion and seminar course that prepares the student to take the national certification and registry examinations. Each student will take self-assessment exams that analyze their technical and clinical skills in the areas of data collection and interpretation, as well as decision making skills. Prerequisites: Admission to upper division Respiratory Care Program; HAT 420, HAT 431 and HAT 432

    1 credit

    HAU 500 - Financing Healthcare Organizations

    Focuses on historic and current issues that impact US healthcare organizations with a primary focus on how health care is delivered, organized and financed. Emphasizes the impact of financing on safety, quality, and the management of risk within healthcare organizations, especially the provider and payment sectors of healthcare. Explores the transformation of healthcare reimbursement from fee-for-service to value-based purchasing, pay-for-performance, and other evolving changes in the financing of healthcare.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 501 - Patient Safety and the Management of Risk

    Provides a strong foundation in the theory of patient safety, quality improvement, and health care risk management in the context of the shifting paradigm in health care. Focuses on the interdisciplinary prevention and management of and response to medical errors. Analysis of risk management as it relates to patient safety standards, quality in health care delivery, health care management paradigms, accreditation, risk finance, and the development of a just culture.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 502 - Patient Safety and Health Law

    Provides an in-depth analysis of the intersection of federal and state laws with an emphasis on how legislation and policy are transforming the US health care industry. Students will analyze trends in national and state legislation and evaluate the effects of legislation and policy on clinical patient care, medical malpractice, the creation of patient safety organizations, apology statutes and disclosure of unanticipated outcomes.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 503 - Error Science, Human Factors and Patient Safety

    Explores best practices from error science and human factors science that can be applied to the healthcare delivery environment to improve quality and reduce medical and human error. Examines various error science theory and human factors (such as fatigue) that contribute to medical errors and how human factors principles are key causes of most adverse events in healthcare. Studies failure mode effects analysis and root cause analysis principles and tools as strategies to reduce and respond to medical error. Explores systems and process analysis as mechanisms to improve patient safety.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 504 - Crew Resource Management, Team Performance, and Communication

    Explores evidence-based high-performing team strategies and communication strategies utilized by aviation, nuclear power and other high reliability organizations (HROs) and analyzes the methods to apply such skills to the health care delivery system. Explores how team building and communication techniques are necessary components to create a patient centered, high quality, patient safety culture within their respective institutions. Explores how continuous quality improvement techniques are utilized to benchmark and assess patient safety.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 505 - Quality Improvement and Safety

    Provides a foundation of skills in Total Quality Management (TQM) and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). Students will learn how to identify problems, collect data, recommend improvements, and use tools and techniques required in CQI. Explores how technological advances have impacted the quality movement. Examines how CQI techniques are utilized to benchmark quality and foster patient safety.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 506 - Accreditation, Regulations, and National Patient Safety Goals

    Explores various accreditation requirements that health care professionals and health care organizations must meet. Focuses on the Joint Commission's National Patient Safety Goals by analyzing the purposes for each goal and exploring mechanisms for implementation and measurements of success in meeting the elements of performance.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 507 - Planning, Evaluation, and Assessment of Patient Safety Initiatives

    Provides a strong foundation for program development of patient safety interventions. Utilizing the PRECEDE-PROCEED framework, students will explore techniques and strategies used for designing, implementing, and evaluating patient safety programs. Topics will include the development of programmatic goals and objectives, assessment, selection of methods and strategies, pre-testing of program materials, adoption and implementation plans, data collection, and evaluation indicators. Recommended: HAU 508, HAU 509

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 508 - Statistics for Patient Safety Professionals

    Quantitative data analysis techniques utilized in patient safety research are explored. Topics include descriptive, inferential, and correlational statistics. Students learn to use available computer programs to conduct a variety of descriptive, inferential, and correlational statistical tests.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 509 - Research Design and Methodology for the Patient Safety Professional

    Provides an in-depth overview of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research designs and methodologies. The student will analyze and evaluate the philosophical foundations, the characteristics, strengths, and limitations of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research designs and methodologies.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 510 - Advanced Practice for Risk and Safety Officers

    Students will analyze advanced practice methods and tools utilized to implement and measure patient safety initiatives, and identify and mitigate error and risk within the healthcare context. Explores issues such as occupational and environmental hazard risk reduction, enterprise risk mitigation planning, medical staff credentialing, and the role of the Governing Board. Prerequisites: HAU 501, HAU 503, HAU 508.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 584 - Capstone Project

    The capstone is designed to allow students to select an area of patient safety, quality, or risk management and demonstrate mastery of the curriculum. This can be accomplished by practicum project or internship experience. The capstone will require students to demonstrate scholarly activity, critical thinking, evidence-based practice, leadership, and professionalism; while affirming the importance of ethical behavior, human diversity, and just culture within a team approach to patient-centered, high quality and safe delivery of health care. The students are expected to put in 45 hours per credit of capstone. Course registration and capstone project is subject to departmental approval. Prerequisite: Departmental approval required for this course.

    Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval required for this course.3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAU 594 - Capstone Research-Based

    Designed to allow students to select an area of patient safety, quality, or risk management and conduct original research. This course encompasses the development of the IRB application through the writing of the graduate thesis. Throughout this course, the student will work with their committee to complete the research project. Prerequisite: departmental approval, HAU 508 and HAU 509.

    Prerequisite(s): departmental approval, HAU 508 and HAU 509.3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 600 - Doctoral Seminar

    Provides a venue for faculty and doctoral students to discuss all aspects of their research. Researchers will present different branches of translational science and discuss linkage between research agendas. Provides opportunity for data to be viewed and analyzed by investigators with different perspectives and tools for analysis. Offered in the

    Fall, 0 credit, S/U grading

    HAX 602 - Frameworks, Models and Classification Systems in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

    Examines the dynamic interaction between health, disability, and community and contextual factors as identified using different frameworks and models. These frameworks and models will be expounded to recognize the influence of each solely and collectively in terms of health and rehabilitation research, disability studies, and behavioral and community health research. Explores parallels and divergences in approaches with particular attention to analyzing how students in varied concentrations can work together to engage in meaningful translational research within the domains of historical and present-day society and research paradigms.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 605 - Research Ethics

    Presents a broad overview of research ethics and regulation. Conveys the moral bases of scientific ethics, the historical evolution of social science and biomedical research ethics, and the development, implementation and limitations of U.S. human subjects regulations. Includes ethics and morality in science; science in society; scientific integrity; misconduct; whistle blowing; conflicts of interest; collegiality; publication and authorship; peer review; history and development of human experimentation ethics and regulations (HHS, FDA); Institutional Review Boards; informed consent, waivers, vulnerable populations; privacy and confidentiality of records; epidemiology; and research using animal subjects.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 620 - Rehabilitation and Disability

    Introduces the Science of Rehabilitation and the Science of Disability. Presents models of rehabilitation and disability research and discusses controversies and commonalities between these areas. Forms the groundwork of future coursework in rehabilitation and movement sciences.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 626 - Outcome Measurement in Rehabilitation Research

    Introduces outcome measures relating to impairments, functional limitations and disability, general health status, and patient/client satisfaction. These outcome measures are used to guide research outcomes. Explores measurement properties and discusses strategies to appropriately assess and select various outcome measurement scales. Critical appraisal of the literature will provide the basis for making research methodological decisions regarding selection of the most effective outcome measures.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 629 - Evidence Based Pediatric Rehabilitation Research

    Provides students an opportunity to develop an overview of issues related to the health of America's children and adolescents. Emphasizes chronic disease and disability, nutrition, fitness, educational accommodations, and trends in long term health services and health policy. Explores the growing need for evidence based practice and outcomes assessment necessary for the development of strategies for optimal function of children with disease/disability and their families. Students will review and analyze evidence for interventions for a specific pathology/disability.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 630 - Exercise Physiology and Physical Activity

    Provides key elements of exercise physiology and instructs students in measurement techniques for the assessment of exercise capacity and physical activity. Reviews normal physiology of the cardiopulmonary system and presents normal immediate response to exercise, and long-term effects of exercise in the healthy individual. Explores foodstuffs for energy production, metabolic pathways for production of ATP, and energy systems used in aerobic and anaerobic activities. Principles of physical activity assessment and body composition and examines qualitative and quantitative measurement techniques across the lifespan and in disability. Assimilates, via lab manual, literature reviews of articles addressing measurement.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 631 - Electro/Neurophysiology: Topics for Rehabilitation Research

    Introduces basic methodology of clinical electrodiagnostic measures of EEG, EMG, nerve conduction velocity studies (NCV), H-reflex and evoked potentials. Interpretation of these measures provides access to the physiological basis of disability in peripheral or central nerve damage and potentials for recovery. Examines the interventions using peripheral and central electrical stimulation modalities on muscle, bone, cardiovascular and autonomic systems. Includes lab activities of selected modalities such as E-stim, FES, TMS, EEG, EMG, NCV, and H-reflex.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 632 - Teaching and Learning

    This course will introduce students to adult learning principles and strategies for effective teaching of cognitive psychomotor and affective skills and behaviors in academia. Individual teaching/learning philosophical orientations, characteristics of the adult learner, learning styles, self-directed learning, and reflective practice will be explored.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 634 - Motor Learning and Motor Control

    This course will introduce the various theories underlying human motor control. Students will actively synthesize and analyze current theory and research related to motor control and skill acquisition through examination of relevant literature. This course places emphasis on determining the implications of this work for future research, educational and/or clinical practice. Includes early and contemporary theory, skill acquisition facilitation, practice, feedback, transfer of training, modeling, part vs whole training, imagery, implicit learning, explicit learning and memory systems.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 635 - Biomechanics and Movement I

    Introduces students to principles and interrelationships of biomechanics and movement. Includes physical biomechanics of the extremities as a foundation from which to apply biomechanical principles. Involves learning to use mathematical approaches to solving static problems and lay the groundwork for solving dynamic biomechanical problems. Reinforces biomechanical theoretical concepts and mathematical models with lab experiments that involve the manipulation of 3D kinematic, kinetic and EMG data

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 636 - Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System and Movement II

    Provides advanced concepts of kinetics in the field of biomechanics. Explores biomechanical concepts during lecture and reinforces those applications with associated lab experiments. Provides viscoelastic characteristics of biological tissues as a foundation applied to human motion. Includes mathematical models of the musculoskeletal system and analysis of the dynamics of human motion. Collection and analysis of gait and other movement kinematics, kinetics and muscle activation by electromyography (EMG) are components of lab activities.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 637 - Orthopedic and Anatomical Principles I

    Provides advanced concepts of orthopedics and anatomy. Focuses on best evidence of examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and procedures used for a variety of orthopedic conditions of the spine and pelvis. Requires active engagement in problem solving by identifying research problems, searching for evidence, and evaluating and synthesizing the evidence to answer research questions. Includes examination of select advanced procedures and principles to enhance research investigations.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 638 - Orthopedic and Anatomical Principles II

    Continues and expands on advanced concepts of orthopedic interventional research. Focuses on best evidence of examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention of orthopedic conditions of the extremities. Requires active engagement in problem solving by identifying research problems, searching for evidence, and evaluating and synthesizing the evidence to answer research questions. Student directed pilot study will incorporate knowledge of select advanced techniques and technologies.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 639 - Technology and Medical Imaging in Rehabilitation

    Examines a range of medical imaging techniques available for use and interpretation in rehabilitation research. Includes radiographs, fluoroscopy, MRI, fMRI,CT, qCT, MEG, TMS and diagnostic US. Synthesizes the technologies and their limitations, the methods of capture and interpretation. Reviews evidence supporting or refuting the sensitivity of these techniques in determining outcomes in rehabilitation.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 641 - Community Mental Health

    Explores the policies and programs that address mental health needs of individuals with a community health focus. Students will apply models of behavior and health to explore topics of mental health including stigma, marginalization, self-determination. Discusses challenges to service provision. Focuses on the ethics of research with this population as a central theme.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 642 - Participation and Health in Pediatric and Educational Settings

    Explores policies and programs that inform pediatric services and community based research. Focuses on pediatric programs that influence health and community participation. Includes programs that support health, wellness, and community participation as well as those influenced by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) that supports children with disabilities from Birth to 21 years. Prerequisites: 24 credits of HAX core courses or permission of Instructor.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 643 - Healthcare Systems and Policy Analysis

    Provides students with an overview of the US healthcare system and major health policy challenges we face. Explores the history and state of the US healthcare system, and circumstances that have given rise to current problems such as employer-based health insurance, challenges in access to and quality of care, and the rising costs associated with the US healthcare model. Discusses ways to improve upon the system, importantly including the Affordable Care Act, and how this legislation was enacted with close attention paid to the policymaking process, roles of political actors, and the importance of policy analysis.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 644 - Ethics, Health Disparities and Social Justice

    Examines aspects of inequality and health status as an injustice within the context of ethical theories (utilitarian, libertarian, deontological, equalitarian). Determines the influence on case studies of health disparities and inequalities. Discusses cases such as global and U.S. racial, class and gender disparities and in developing countries. Presents ethical issues relative to different methods of measuring health inequalities and related policies.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 645 - Organizational Theory, Management and Leadership

    Examines theoretical and conceptual framework for understanding leadership and management styles of health and human services organizations and how they operate in a broader community. Identifies and applies strategic models to analyze organizational problems, organizational behaviors and processes, formulate strategic solutions, and make sound decisions. This knowledge is critical for the behavioral and community health field to understand how individuals influence and are influenced by organizations.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 646 - Social Behavior and Community Health Change

    Examines the nature of the behavior that takes place within social systems and how to effectuate change in these systems. Analysis of behavior and possibilities for change will be placed in the context of health and public health questions and will draw upon theories of organizational behavior, leadership, and mechanisms for action.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 647 - Policies and Ethics in Behavioral and Community Health

    Explores health care policies of the US health care system and the influence on public health and programs in behavior and community health. Includes access and utilization of health care, barriers to care, prevention programs, and health disparities and ethics. Addresses the perspectives of the consumer, provider and the institution.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 653 - Research Methods: Design and Statistics

    This course presents process and skills needed to develop independent research studies, including but not limited to, formulating a research question or hypothesis, conducting literature searches, critically appraising scientific literature, and selecting appropriate research designs and methods. This information will be presented in the context of protecting human subjects and health information based on the policies and procedures of the Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CORIHS) and IACUC.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 656 - Qualitative Research

    Students will learn the basic principles and techniques of effective analysis and interpretation of the merits of qualitative data. Examines how qualitative research captures complex phenomena that span the international classification of function (ICF) and impact on quality of life, illness/injury experience and recovery. Students will learn the strengths and limitations of qualitative analysis and how it complements quantitative analysis. Emphasizes several methods to represent data, such as the mixed method approach, and students will apply a range of analysis techniques through research exercises.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 663 - Disability, Occupation and Community

    Inspired by disability justice social movements in the US and abroad, this course presents politically engaged critical approaches to disability that intersect community organizations, the arts and academic fields including occupational therapy, disability studies and anthropology. Broader than a medical category, disability identity recognizes the political and economic dimensions of disability inequity as it related to other forms of inequality and disadvantage. Themes include all permutations of the concept of occupy;disability justice/decolonization; [participation and training for collaborations; marginalization and minoritization; technology; struggle, creativity, and change.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 664 - Conceptual Foundations of Disability Studies 1890s-1990s

    Present conceptual foundations of disability studies beginning with the 19th and early 20th century theories and scholarships. Theorists from the 1960s and 1970s who influenced the theoretical development of the new field of disability studies will be discussed. The course will explore foundational disability studies scholarship of the 1980s and 1990s as the field established itself first in the social sciences and then the humanities.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 665 - Disability, Participation and Justice

    Explores concepts of "Participation" and "Justice" as they relate to disability experience. Introduces research strategies, participatory methods and methodologies for disability studies research in the applied social and health sciences. Discusses ethical issues in disability research and what it means to disabled people in daily life. Examines social analysis, healthcare discourse, and research on the evolution of healthcare practices, cultural beliefs, and social structures influencing the treatments, services, and opportunities available to disabled people in the United States and internationally.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 667 - Disability Studies Language, Narrative and Rhetoric

    Focuses on how language and rhetoric frame how disability is perceived, experienced, and treated. Included critical and rhetorical analysis of professional discourses as well as personal disability narratives and memoirs. The society for Disability Studies, an interdisciplinary organization, says in its mission statement, disability is a key aspect of human experience.So is language. This course explores the interdisciplinary nature of disability studies and the roles language and rhetoric play in representations of disability. Some questions to be explored include: In what ways do clinical or professional discourses and personal narratives reveal experience of power and powerlessness? How is the bodily experience of disability described in professional contexts as compared to personal narratives? How does description and perception influence the practice of professionals and quality of life for people with disabilities? What assumptions about disability are revealed through rhetorical analysis? These questions will frame our attention to representations of disability in a variety of texts: academic, professional, literary, clinical, personal, and visual. Not to be taken for credit with ESL 592

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 668 - Emerging Topics in Disability Studies

    Focues on the intersections of disability with other emerging area studies such as gender, class, sexuality, race and global studies. Encompass study of different emerging disciplinary areas of disability studies in the social sciences, health sciences, humanities, business, and technology. Explores the connections between disability activism, art, and scholarship in the 21 century. Traces emerging regional distinctions in disability studies research and scholarship, especially between Northern and Southern Countries

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 669 - Disability and Health in Local and Global Contexts

    Critically examines the experiences of people with disabilities in a local and global context and examines the connections between the two contexts. Utilizes policy documents, ethnographies, memoirs, program evaluations, and multi-media and provides the tools to critically evaluate local and global disability experiences as well as programs and interventions.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 690 - Independent Study in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

    Independent study proposals in health and rehabilitation sciences. Approval of independent study proposal and credit hours required prior to registration.

    1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 693 - Directed Readings

    Provides faculty directed readings and guided discussion to synthesize selected content related to the current course curriculum and/or to the students' research interests. Through the guided readings, the students will learn foundational and advanced theoretical constructs that will be important underpinnings of their future studies and doctoral research. Specifically, studies may focus in the concentration areas of rehabilitation and movement science, disability studies or behavioral and community health. A critical analysis of readings may include theoretical constructs, methodologies, and/or interpretation of results. The course will include analytical writings and a summative paper.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAX 699 - Dissertation Research On Campus

    Dissertation research under direction of advisor. Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research must take place on SBU campus.

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research must take place on SBU campus.1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HAX 700 - Dissertation Research Off Campus- Domestic

    Dissertation research under direction of an advisor. Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.

    Prerequisite(s): Advancement to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HAX 701 - Dissertation Research Off Campus International

    Dissertation research under direction of an advisor. Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver by the second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable. All international students must receive clearance from an International Advisor.

    Prerequisite(s): Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver by the second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable. All international students must receive clearance from an International Advisor.1-9 credits, S/U grading

    HAY 500 - Neuroscience for Physical Therapy

    Presents neuroscience in a systems approach and integrates general principles of organization and function of the autonomic, peripheral and central nervous system's approach to neuroscience. The anatomy of a system will be followed with its physiology, pathophysiology and clinical relevance to the physical therapist. Clinical topics include neurological testing, control of posture and balance, pain, muscle tone and spasticity, feedback vs. feedforward control, reflex versus voluntary control, control of reaching and locomotion, perception and learning. Prerequisites: First Year Summer Courses

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 501 - Growth and Development Across the Life Span

    Presents an integrated approach to normal human growth and development throughout the life-span. Examines developmental norms and sequences with emphasis on biophysical (motor and sensory), cognitive, language, and psychosocial tasks. Discusses social/cultural/environmental influences. The coursework covers developmental issues during prenatal, infant, child, adolescent, adult and geriatric time periods. Prerequisites: First Year Courses

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 502 - Psychosocial Aspects of Disability I

    Emphasizes the psychosocial aspects of disability as they affect the life of the individual. Topics include identification of pre-morbid factors that contribute to positive adjustment or maladaptive responses to disability; the influence of culture on individual and family expectations of the health care system; patient perspectives as consumers of the health care system; and changing roles in the family. Students will practice techniques of positive listening and role-play to develop skills in recognizing psychosocial factors during acquisition of patient history. Emphasizes utilization of psychosocial information in the establishment of a plan of care for patients across the life span. Prerequisites: First Year and Second Year Summer Courses

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 503 - Psychosocial Aspects of Disability II

    Explores the interactions of the individual with disability within the community. Focuses on concerns of the individual beyond physical rehabilitation. Topics include concomitant mental health issues; the mind-body connection; humor in medicine; complementary and alternative medicine; technology and disability; vocational rehabilitation; sexuality; domestic violence and interpersonal abuse; substance abuse; and terminal illness. Promotes identification and communication with local, regional and national resources that enable individuals with disabilities to engage in recreational, vocational, or educational endeavors. Prerequisites: Second Year Fall Courses.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 504 - Adult Neurological Assessment I

    Prepares students to examine, assess, establish problem lists, and determine and write appropriate goals for individuals with neurological disorders. Presents fundamental testing and evaluation skills including sensory, musculoskeletal, tone and coordination , motor control, balance, postural stability, and function. Trains students through role playing, videotape analyses and clinical patient experiences. Students will develop assessment skills appropriate for various patients who present with neurological disorders as introduced in Clinical Medicine. Lab experiences and reports require written and verbal justification for student clinical decisions. Provides students with experiences choosing appropriate outcome measures and develops competence in performing these measures on volunteer patients. Prepares second year physical therapy students to assess and begin basic treatment of patients with neurological dysfunction during clinical experiences. Prerequisites: First Year Courses

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 505 - Adult Neurological Assessment II

    Prepares students to examine, assess, establish problem lists, and determine and write appropriate goals for individuals with various neurological disorders. Fundamental testing and assessment skills include advanced sensory, advanced balance, levels of consciousness, cranial nerve, electromyography, nerve conduction velocity, vestibular assessment and function. Students develop assessment skills appropriate for various patients who present with neurological disorders. Provides experiences for students to choose appropriate outcome measures and perform these measures on volunteer patients. Prerequisites: First Year Courses and Second Year Summer Courses

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 506 - Adult Neurological Interventions

    Examines the impact of adult neurological conditions on activities identified by an individual as essential to support physical, social and psychological well being and create a personal sense of meaningful life. Students will continue with practice of synthesis of examination data during the evaluation process. Emphasizes the development and implementation of appropriate intervention strategies based on best evidence available for peoples with neurological or neuromuscular disorders. Prerequisites: Second Year Fall Courses

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 507 - Orthopedic Physical Therapy Ia

    Introduces concepts of musculoskeletal concepts within patient/client management model. Sharpens student's evaluation skills as clinical decision-making and differential physical therapy diagnosis, prognosis and intervention are introduced in the framework of musculoskeletal dysfunction. Explores functional anatomy, including the osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, mycology and neurology of the lower extremities as they relate to surgical and non-surgical musculoskeletal conditions.. Prerequisites: First Year Courses

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 508 - Orthopedic Physical Therapy II

    Builds on the concepts and skills of Orthopedic Physical Therapy I by integrating clinical decision-making and differential physical therapy diagnosis, prognosis and intervention of the lower extremities with the spine and upper extremities. Various musculoskeletal dysfunctions of the trunk and upper extremities are explored. Functional anatomy, including the osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, mycology and neurology of the trunk and upper extremities are discussed as they relate to surgical and non-surgical musculoskeletal conditions. Prerequisite: Second Year Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): Second Year Fall Courses3.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 509 - Pediatric Physical Therapy

    Emphasizes the study of atypical movement patterns in children. Presents developmental and long-term effects of neuromuscular and musculoskeletal dysfunction as they relate to movement. Students learn examination and interventions for subtle and complex movement dysfunctions resulting from a variety of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular diagnoses, conditions, and syndromes including but not limited to preterm birth, torticollis, developmental hip dysplasia, OBPI, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, autism, developmental coordination disorder (DCD), Spina Bifida and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Explores strategies for working with children presenting at the opposite ends of functional abilities (severe/multiple vs minimal handicapping conditions. Addresses the role of the physical therapist during transitions between delivery settings. Prerequisite: Second Year Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): Second Year Fall Courses5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 510 - Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation

    Utilizes the patient-client management model. Spans in-patient, out-patient rehabilitation and home care settings. Includes interpretation of electrocardiograms and grades exercise tests, and chest physical therapy techniques to mobilize secretions. Explores exercise prescription for aerobic endurance training for individuals with cardiac and pulmonary disease and the use of appliances in elderly patients with cardiac and pulmonary disease. Emphasizes the use of physical examination findings that direct chest physical therapy interventions, exercise prescription, and a total plan of care. Prerequisites: Second Year Courses

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 512 - Prosthetics and Orthoses

    Studies prosthetic and orthoses management as applied to a variety of patient populations across a life span. Addresses considerations of various pathology and medical surgical management to formulate appropriate patient examinations, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis and intervention that are consistent with physical therapy practice guidelines. Principals of normal biomechanics, pathomechanics, physiology and pathophysiology will be a major focus for evaluation, intervention and education of the vascular, neuromuscular, and / or musculoskeletal compromised patient that may utilizes prosthetic or orthotic devises. Basic principles of mechanical physics and material characteristics will be applied. Clinical site visits are scheduled to observe and practice patient evaluation, treatment and education techniques. Prerequisites: First Year Courses and Second Year Summer Courses

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 513 - Orthopedic Physical Therapy Ib

    A continuation and application of HAY 507. Explores concepts of musculoskeletal concepts within patient/client management model. Sharpens student's evaluation skills as clinical decision-making and differential physical therapy diagnosis, prognosis and intervention are introduced in the framework of musculoskeletal dysfunction. Applies general skills to various neuromusculoskeletal dysfunctions of the lower extremity. Explores functional anatomy, including the osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, mycology and neurology of the lower extremities as they relate to surgical and non-surgical musculoskeletal conditions. Prerequisites: Second Year Summer Courses

    1.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 515 - Foundations of Kinesiology Foundations of Kinesiology

    Explores the essential topics of Kinesiology and establishes a basis for future study of applied kinesiology. Introduces the study of normal human movement including topics such as movement description, muscle function, and biomechanics.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 517 - Exercise Physiology

    Reviews the normal physiology of the cardiopulmonary system. Presents the normal immediate response to exercise and long-term effects of exercise in the healthy well individual. Includes presentation of foodstuffs for energy production, metabolic pathways for production of ATP, and energy systems used in aerobic and anaerobic activities. The course includes strength and endurance exercise prescription for the healthy well individual. Also includes laboratory experiences for the measurement of vitals and select exercise testing. Prerequisites: First Year Summer Courses

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 518 - Foundations of Exercise and Movement in PT

    Presents an introduction to the fundamental principles of strength and flexibility. Fundamentals of muscle and connective tissue function from microstructure to macrostructure are considered in health and dysfunctional states through the life span. These basic principles will be expanded to explore the concept of myofascial mobility, extensibility and length. Students will combine the skills learned in Kinesiology with those learned in this course to begin the process of examination, evaluation and designing intervention programs for the movement dysfunction. Prerequisites: First Year Summer Courses

    3.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 519 - Kinesiology

    Explores the kinetics and kinematics of normal, purposeful human movement. Integrates knowledge of human anatomy, physiology, mechanics and biomechanics as it applies to movement of the extremities and spine. Includes evaluation procedures such as manual muscle testing and measurement of joint range of motion. Direct patient contact is scheduled. Prerequisites: First Year Summer Courses

    5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 520 - Biomechanics

    Biomechanics uses laws of physics and engineering to describe the motion undergone by various body segments and the forces acting on these body parts during activities. Considers the application of classic mechanics, including statics, dynamics, solid mechanics, and fluid mechanics to describe movement and the loads placed on biological tissue. Uses a quantitative biomechanical approach to analyze loads on joints and soft tissue during movement, skill performance especially related to sports, the efficiency of movement and the biomechanical rationale for specific physical therapy intervention. Students analyze a movement biomechanically using appropriate mathematical formulas and analyze and critique relevant quantitative information from the literature.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 524 - Health, Wellness and Prevention in Physical Therapy

    Presents issues related to promotion of health and wellness and concepts of integrative medicine. Examines and integrates general fitness into the following clinical environments: obstetrics, occupational health and injury prevention, ergonomics, sports medicine (pre, post, and in season), obesity, chronic pain, pediatrics, geriatrics, and athletic programs for the physically and/or mentally challenged. Students will perform screening techniques for the assessment of the following wellness issues: school-based scoliosis, safety and accessibility of children play areas, cardiovascular fitness, and fall prevention in the elderly. Based upon the findings of screens and individual client goals, students will develop, implement and assess the effectiveness of a cohesive wellness program. Introduces issues related to the development of a wellness center and visits to established prevention programs in the community. Prerequisites: Second Year Courses

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 525 - Advanced Therapeutic Exercise

    Provides students with the opportunity to apply and analyze therapeutic exercise techniques in order to formulate exercise programs for diverse patient and client populations. Students will be encouraged to discuss and build upon their knowledge of basic therapeutic techniques attained from previous coursework and clinical training experiences. Advanced techniques will be demonstrated and practiced in lab. Students will evaluate, set goals, develop therapeutic exercise programs and measure outcomes. Issues regarding frequency, intensity and duration of treatment will be discussed throughout the course. Prerequisites: Second Year Courses

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 526 - Clinical Medicine and Pharmacology I

    Provides a foundation in medicine and differential diagnosis. Introduces the Nagi's model of disablement and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), the Patient/Client Management model and outcomes management that guide the process of clinical decision-making. Principles of pharmacology, medical imaging and laboratory diagnostic testing will be integrated to facilitate safe and effective patient management planning. Familiarizes students with medical terminology and abbreviations for efficient and effective chart reviewing and documentation. Explores select systemic diseases will be explored, focusing on epidemiology, pathology, histology, etiology, as well as primary and secondary clinical characteristics. Medical and surgical management will be discussed and integrated to formulate appropriate intervention indications, precautions and contraindications. . Prerequisites: First Year Summer Courses

    3.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 527 - Principles of Inpatient Care

    Emphasizes use of the patient-client management model focused on the acute care in-hospital setting and the acute rehabilitation and sub-acute rehabilitation settings. Includes fundamental skills of chart review and documentation; body mechanics; examination techniques; turning and positioning; bed mobility; transfer training; ambulation training; wheelchair management; deep breathing exercises; and discharge planning. Discusses special populations relevant to the in-patient environment. Includes post-operative orthopedic patients; patients with acute neurological disorders and acute cardiothoracic disorders; and pediatric, geriatric, and general medicine patients. Designed to prepare entry level physical therapy students to evaluate and treat patients during their first clinical affiliation. Prerequisites: First Year Fall Courses

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 528 - Clinical Medicine and Pharmacology II

    This course continues to build a foundation in medicine and differential diagnosis. Utilize the concepts of evidence-based practice, ICF and Nagi's model of disablement, and the Patient/Client Management model as frameworks for clinical decision-making. Presents in-depth exploration of frequently encountered pathologies and injuries across the life span. Presents epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical characteristics with subsequent medical and surgical management of each pathology/injury. Students are required to apply knowledge of pharmacology, diagnostic radiology and laboratory testing into safe and effective patient management through clinical case study exercises. Focuses on the formulation of appropriate rehabilitation intervention indications, precautions and contraindications. Students will continue to build a repertoire of medical terminology, medical chart abbreviations and clinical outcome measures. Proficiency is expected with an actual medical record review and analysis, andthe synthesis of an appropriate patient/client management plan consistent with the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Prerequisites: First Year Fall Courses

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 529 - Principles in Pharmacology

    Examines the general principles of pharmacology including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of common drugs used in clinical medicine. Explores implications of the use of pharmacological agents for the central nervous, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromusculoskeletal, and endocrine systems, as well as chemotherapeutics, as it relates to physical therapy patient/client management across the lifespan.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 530 - Differential Diagnosis

    Introduces students to the role that health screenings and systems review play in the process of making physical therapy diagnoses. Evidence based clinical decision making consistent with the patient client management model will be the foundation upon which differential diagnoses are made. Case studies will be used to integrate screening information in determining a physical therapy diagnosis and making decision regarding intervention versus referral.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 531 - Motor Learning

    Synthesizes and analyzes current theory and research related to skill acquisition through examination of historical and current literature. Places emphasis on determining the implications of this work for future research, educational and/or clinical practice. Includes early and contemporary theory, skill acquisition facilitation, practice, feedback, transfer of training, modeling, part vs. whole training, imagery, implicit learning, explicit learning, and memory systems.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 533 - Implicit vs Explicit Learning

    Explores memory systems active in implicit and explicit motor learning. Critically evaluates and integrates current research related to implicit and explicit learning. Research will include developmental and neuropsychological approaches to learning for rehabilitation. Students will determine the usefulness of the methodology, task design and the results of each study.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 534 - Motor Learning and Motor Control

    Establishes a context for the major explanatory concepts applied to the issues of coordination and skill and learning. Foundational material from Neuroscience will support the application and theory addressed throughout the course. Uses academic rationalization and cognitive processing philosophies to develop and refine intellectual processes. Students learn from historical perspectives of motor control to develop skills necessary to pose and solve problems, to infer, to hypothesize, and to locate needed resources for theoretically sound clinical judgments. Students read original research papers and current literature pertaining to motor learning, motor programs and dynamic pattern theory. Student will analyze papers examining loss of function related to disease or injury. Prerequisite: First Year Fall Classes

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Fall Classes3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 535 - Issues in Motor Control

    Establishes historical context for the major explanatory concepts applied to issues of coordination and skill during the last century. Compares readings of original work of Bernstein to current literature pertaining to motor programs, dynamic pattern theory and computational models. Students will critically evaluate papers related to the control of locomotion and the control of reaching and grasping skills.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 536 - Introduction to Motor Control

    Establishes historical context for major explanatory concepts applied to issues of coordination and skill during the last century. Presents readings of original work of leading theoreticians and researchers who have made significant contributions during this period. Students will critically evaluate papers related to reflex theory, serial order, servocontrol, information processing theory, motor programs, dynamic pattern theory and computational models.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 537 - Neuroplasticity

    Presents an overview of recovery of function mechanisms. Critically analyzes animal and human research literature examining spinal cord, somatosensory cortex, motor cortex and neural plasticity. Addresses effectiveness of different human research paradigms exploring the issue of neural changes. Explores the effects of age, nature of lesion, environment and pharmacology on recovery of function. Links neural plasticity research to conceptual frameworks for clinical practice.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 541 - Physical Agents and Wound Care in Physical Therapy

    Physical modalities including superficial and deep thermal agents, hydrotherapy, aquatic therapy, intermittent compression, and mechanical traction, Emphasis on evidence-based practice with ample opportunity to learn from experienced clinicians through guest lectures and site visits. Students focus on pre-treatment assessment and physiological response to treatment as the basis for clinical decision making. Patient education, treatment preparation and performance, indications and contraindications will be covered for each modality. Supervised laboratory sessions provide a safe atmosphere for the administration of these agents as well as direct observation of clinical effects. Laboratory sessions and group discussions will be case study driven to foster critical thinking and collaborative learning.

    1.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 542 - Electrotherapy in Physical Therapy

    Presents principles of electrophysics and the application to the human body in health and disease and relates principles to the use of electrophysiologic stimulators and testing equipment in physical therapy clinical practice. Discusses properties of excitable membranes and effects of electrical stimulation on muscle and nerve tissue. Promotes evidence-based practice through analysis of appropriate literature. Covers electrotherapeutic management of impairments and pathology of musculoskeletal system, neuromuscular system, cardiopulmonary system and the integument. Explores the role of electrotherapy as adjunctive modality in a comprehensive physical therapy treatment plan. Discusses fundamental skills for application of biphasic pulsed current, monophasic pulsed current, uninterrupted direct current, interferential electrical stimulation, Russian stimulation, microstimulation (MENS), transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS), neurostimulation (NMES), functional electrical stimulation (FES) and iontophoresis. Introduces biofeedback and electrodiagnostic testing: nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and electromyography (EMG).

    2.5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 543 - Wound Care in Physical Therapy

    Introduces the physical therapist's role in management of chronic wounds. Focuses on performing a comprehensive assessment designed to identify challenges to proper wound closure. Students will use the results of this assessment to form an appropriate plan of care based on the clinical presentation of the wound and the individual needs of each patient/client. Discusses mechanisms of integumentary healing in the human body including potential difficulties posed by cardiovascular, orthopedic, neurological and endrocinologic/metabolic disorders. Considers local factors implicated in delayed wound closure. Students learn to set appropriate goals and apply treatment interventions including wound irrigation and debridement, pressure relief, and choice of topical agents and dressing to promote efficient closure. Emphasizes evidence-based practice: focuses on pre-treatment assessment physiological response to treatment, and best available research as the basis for clinical decision making. Covers patient education, treatment preparation and performance, indications and contraindications for intervention. Laboratory sessions and group discussions will be case study driven to foster critical thinking and collaborative learning. Prerequisites: First Year Fall Courses

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 544 - Modalities in Physical Therapy

    Introduces physical modalities including superficial and deep thermal agents, hydrotherapy, aquatic therapy, intermittent compression, and mechanical traction. Presents principles of electrophysics and the application to the human body in health and disease. Includes polarity, voltage, current, Ohm's law and the use of electrophysiologic stimulators and testing equipment in physical therapy clinical practice. Discusses properties of excitable membranes and effects of electrical stimulation on muscle and nerve tissue. Promotes evidence-based practice through analysis of appropriate literature. Covers electrotherapeutic management of impairments and pathology of musculoskeletal system, neuromuscular system, cardiopulmonary system and the integument. Presents fundamental skills for application of electrical stimulation including biphasic pulsed current, monophasic pulsed current, uninterrupted direct current, interferential electrical stimulation, Russian stimulation, microstimulation (MENS), transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS), neurostimulation (NMES), functional electrical stimulation (FES) and iontophoresis. Prerequisites: First Year Summer Courses

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 545 - Ethics and Health Care for Physical Therapists

    Provides an overview of the ethics of health care in a rapidly changing society. Explores ethical issues surrounding health care changes and public health policy. Includes an overview of the ethics within patient education and discussions involving the physical therapy professional codes of ethics and standards. Students will learn how to approach ethical dilemmas using theoretical frameworks and decision-making processes. Introduces the student to the ethics within physical therapy and other health care professions through the use of case studies. Includes a review of classic cases in health care ethics, involving issues such as euthanasia and organ transplants, from an ethical, legal and historical perspective. Prerequisites: Second Year Courses

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 548 - Medical Imaging

    Introduces equipment, procedures and use of medical imaging for examination and evaluation of dysfunction. Examines topics such as radiographs, arthrography, CT scans, MRI, and nuclear studies. Case studies will be used to integrate imaging data into the patient/client management plan.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 550 - Statistics

    Presents the fundamentals of statistical analysis. Includes performing basic statistical analyses using at least one computer program. Topics include descriptive statistics, statistical inference, tests for experimental comparisons, correlation, regression, and nonparametric tests. Addresses the relationship between statistics and research design by introducing relevant research articles in the field of physical therapy.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 551 - Introduction to Research Methods and Design

    Introduces basic concepts of scientific design and methodology for the critical examination of scientific literature. Explores the relevance of research application and evidence-based practice in physical therapy. Introduces concepts of dependent, independent variables, hypothesis testing, sampling, and experimental controls. Addresses ethical issues, informed consent and human subject constraints. Measurement reliability and validity will be emphasized with application to outcomes management. Explores a variety of research designs including experimental, quasi-experimental, descriptive, correlation, qualitative and single case study designs. Basic concepts of statistical analyses will be integrated through discussion and literature learning projects.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 552 - Research Methods for Physical Therapists

    First of three courses designed to prepare students to search for and critically appraise scientific literature as well as understand the fundamentals of research methods, design, and statistics. Includes principles of evidence based practice, use of electronic data bases to search for evidence, research and measurement reliability and validity, research design, descriptive statistics, statistical inference, tests for experimental comparison, correlation, regression, and nonparametric tests. Addresses the relationship between statistics and research design by introducing relevant research articles in the healthcare field. Prerequisites: First Year Fall Courses

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 553 - Computer Literacy and Evidence Based Practice

    Addresses the foundational skills practicing therapists need to effectively manage, integrate, and communicate information for clinical practice, research and professional activities. This course exists in three parts. Part I focuses on accessing and evaluating clinical information. Part II focuses on information organization and manipulation. Part III focuses on the management and professional communication of information.

    1-2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 556 - Outcomes Measurement and Analysis

    Introduces students to various outcome measures relating to impairments, functional limitations and disability, general health status, and patient/client satisfaction used to guide physical therapy practice across the lifespan. Measurement properties will be explored and strategies discussed to appropriately assess and select various outcome measurement scales. Critical appraisal of the literature will provide the basis for making clinical decisions regarding selection of the most beneficial outcome measure for an individual patient/client, service and/or program.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 557 - Introduction to Evidence Based Practice

    Addresses foundational skills practicing therapists need to effectively access, manage, integrate and communicate information for clinical practice, research and professional activities. Uses core electronic information resources, including clinical decision-support databases and knowledge management tools to quickly locate and effectively assess the quality of clinical and healthcare bibliographic databases such as PubMed and CINAHL. Emphasizes citation tracking tools and critical clinical decision support tools including Web of Science and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Trains students in the use of citation management software (EndNoteX6) to support research. Prerequisites: First Year Courses

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 558 - Evidence Based Practice Seminar

    Explores a broad spectrum of research literature examining physical therapy practice. Uses literature as a tool to integrate students critical inquiry skills and depth of knowledge in biomechanical analysis, musculoskeletal measurement, cardiopulmonary functions, motor control and motor learning theory. Students judge the strength of the evidence of each paper and draw conclusions regarding its clinical significance in neuromotor and musculoskeletal rehabilitation. When lacking evidence, challenges students to suggest ways to strengthen the current evidence. Prerequisites: Second Year Courses

    1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 560 - Professional Practice I: Foundations

    First of three courses regarding the developing physical therapy professional. Discusses historical, ethical and legal foundations and current and emerging issues affecting change within the profession. Introduces the format and function of the APTA at the national and state levels. Examines the roles and responsibilities of the physical therapist, the physical therapist assistant and the physical therapist aide in the present healthcare environment. Explores dynamics of professional interactions with patients, families and other healthcare providers.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 561 - Teaching, Consulting, Communicating in Clinical Education

    Examines different learning styles and their effect on the learning environment. The fundamentals of teaching as they apply to patient education, professional inservices, and clinical education are presented and practiced. Students are introduced to aspects of verbal and nonverbal communication, with the opportunity to work in small groups for application of these principles. The aspect of physical therapy consultation in clinical experiences as well as professional opportunities is explored. Preparation for the first clinical education experience, specifically clinical site and academic program expectations, professional behavior, and student responsibilities, are discussed in detail. Prerequisites: First Year Fall Courses

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 562 - Selected Topics in Clinical Education and Professional Development

    Provides framework for assuming the roles of a clinical instructor. Includes the preplanning period, structuring the actual clinical experience, and types of evaluation provided to physical therapy students. Explores various models of clinical education and opportunities for APTA Residencies and Fellowships. Emphasizes self assessment, communication skills and professional development.Links discussions with concurrent learning experiences in Clinical Intership II including learning opportunities, patient care and teaching styles. Explores in detail selected topics from APTA clinical performance instruments. Uses a case study for students to delve deeper into plan of care for a patient receiving treatment during the Clinical Practice II.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 563 - Teaching and Physical Therapy Practice

    Introduces students to adult learning principles and strategies for teaching in the academic and clinical environments. Explores teaching/learning philosophies, characteristics of the adult learner, learning styles, self-directed learning, and reflective practice. Discusses the clinical environment as a community of practice, with emphasis on the student, clinical instructor and community as a learning triad. Students will be given the option to become credentialed clinical instructors through the American Physical Therapy Association.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 576 - Clinical Decision Making

    Explores various theories and concepts of clinical decision-making and physical therapy diagnosis. Clinical reasoning including hypothesis generation and refinement applied within the context of the NAGI Disablement Model and patient/client management model as outlined in The Guide to Physical Therapy Practice. Clinical cases will be used to explore the diagnostic practice patterns across the lifespan.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 580 - Practicum

    A limited number of students may enroll in 3-6 credits of independent study in research, education, clinical practice, or management/administration. Each practicum project is uniquely designed to meet the needs of the student. Mentored by faculty with expertise in the area of study. Acceptable projects must include design, implementation and analysis phases. 3-6 credits by permission of the Program Director.

    3-6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 589 - Case Studies I

    Develop's students' ability to utilize and apply relevant knowledge and skills within the patient management model including examination, evaluation, and development of intervention strategies. Students will discover how the four systems (neuromotor, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, and integumentary) work together to influence function through problem-based activities and case studies. Culminates in student group presentations with defense of clinical decisions for assigned case studies at the end of this integrative experience. Prerequisites: First Year Fall Courses

    1 credit, S/F graded

    HAY 590 - Case Studies II

    Second in a two-course sequence to further develop students' ability to utilize and apply relevant knowledge and skills within the patient management model. With each Case Studies course, the demand on students for synthesis and integration increases. Requires students to examine, evaluate, determine differential diagnosis, prognosticate, develop and integrate intervention strategies for patients of varying ages from diverse cultural backgrounds with complex neuromotor, cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, and or integumentary pathology/dysfunction. Culminates in student group presentations with defense of clinical decisions for assigned case studies at the end of this integrative experience. Prerequisites: Second Year Fall Courses

    1 credit, S/F graded

    HAY 595 - Clinical Internship I

    An eight-week course that provides students with their first full-time clinical experience. A licensed physical therapist is responsible for close supervision and guidance during the learning experience. Provides students with the opportunity to utilize the patient management model of care. Students participate in documentation, coordination of care and discharge planning. Students will perform reexaminations, measure patient outcomes, and modify interventions accordingly. Students will perform an in-service during this clinical experience. Students are required to submit guided journals to DCE via email to promote reflective thinking during clinical experience. Prerequisites: Second Year Summer Courses

    6 credits, S/F graded

    HAY 601 - Issues in Global Health Care

    Examines theories of health and wellness in the context of national and international public health initiatives. Explores epidemiology of intrinsic and extrinsic high risk factors and the social and political context of professional practice. Current and projected roles of the physical therapist and other health care workers in evolving health care environments are explored, examining various health care models to determine the current impact on practice outcomes and to hypothesize future effectiveness.

    2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 602 - Issues in Health Care Administration

    Provides an understanding of the role of manager/supervisor as it relates to the goals and objectives of a physical therapy practice or department. Topics include communication skills in business management; ethical decision making in physical therapy practice; delivery systems; legislation and regulation; business planning; marketing and public relations. Prerequisites: Second Year Courses

    1-3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 608 - Orthopedic Examination and Intervention I

    Combining lectures, demonstrations, and hands on laboratory sessions, this course will emphasize the application of evidence-based practice in all areas of spinal management. Where little evidence exists, a pragmatic approach integrating basic principles of biomechanics and pathokinesiology will be used. Provides an introduction to the biomechanical, dysfunction types, and their respective terminology. Presents an integrated model of physical therapy examination and evaluation of spinal disorders. Discusses and incorporates a physical therapy management approach of manual therapy of the spine and pelvis combined with patient education and exercise. The course will devote lab time to carefully monitor skills of palpation, examination, and interventions.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 610 - Fitness and Wellness

    Examines and integrates the principles of strength, endurance, speed and agility training to formulate a wellness screening and program design. These principles will be used as a framework to examine the physical therapist's role in women's health, occupational health and injury prevention, sports medicine (pre-, post-, and in-season), obesity and athletic programs for the mentally and physically challenged. Students will explore the evidence for various fitness techniques.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 611 - Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Rehab and Wellness

    Examines and integrates the principles of complementary and alternative approaches such as Pilates, Yoga, T'ai Chi, Acupuncture, and Feldenkrais into physical therapy directed wellness programs. Explores the evidence for utilization of these techniques in selected patient populations.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 612 - Sports and Exercise Nutrition

    Integrates the concepts of nutrition, bioenergetics, and energy expenditure into a broad understanding of the role of nutrition in daily activity, wellness parameters, and exercise performance. Emphasis will be placed on the topics of macro- and micro- nutrients and their effects during exercise and training, nutrient bioenergetics, thermoregulation, ergogenic aids, body composition, energy balance and weight control, and optimal nutrition for healthy lifestyles.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 615 - Applied Physiological Foundations of Exercise

    Explores literature related to the physiological basis for exercise, in healthy and at risk populations, and in patients with disease, at the multi-system level. Moves from substrates and their effects on exercise, through metabolic processes, to energy systems. Identifies various exercise states, and explores the body's immediate response and long-term adaptation. Nutrition and its impact on movement will be detailed. Information from metabolic gas analysis will be coupled with other clinical tests and measures to design exercise programs. Culminates in the application of principles of exercise physiology in the prescription of exercise for health and prevention across the lifespan and in the treatment of various patients and at risk populations. Current research will provide the basis for examining the evidence underlying principles of exercise for various populations across the lifespan.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 616 - Exercise Prescription

    Presents issues related to exercise prescription for health, wellness and prevention in various healthy and at risk populations across the lifespan. Explores various physiological principles and topics in fitness and cardiopulmonary care through case studies. Examines various patient/client types and health and prevention settings (e.g. cardiac, high risk populations, obstetrics, occupational health and injury prevention, ergonomics, sports medicine (pre, post and in-season), obesity, athletic programs for the physically and/or mentally challenged, falls prevention in the elderly and cardiac fitness programs) and integrates general fitness.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 622 - Current Topics in Pediatrics

    Emphasizes the examination, evaluation, assessment, intervention and outcome measure of children with disabilities. Topics will enhance and challenge those physical therapists that practice in a pediatric setting. Explores the use of current and future adaptive equipment in pediatrics as well as the role of the pediatric physical therapist in a variety of contexts and environments.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 692 - Clinical Internship II

    An eight week full-time clinical experience and is the second clinical experience in the curriculum. Students will provide direct patient care, collaborate with other health care professionals, coordinate care of patients, delegate and supervise support personnel and promote wellness and prevention services. Student will incorporate outcome measures into the evaluation process and suggest specific measure useful for the clinical setting. Students will perform an in-service and communicate regularly with DCE to promote reflective thinking during clinical experience. Prerequisites: Second Year Courses

    8 credits, S/F graded

    HAY 693 - Clinical Internship III

    A ten-week full-time clinical experience. A licensed physical therapist is responsible for supervision during the learning experience. The students will provide direct patient care, collaborate with other health care professionals, coordinate care of patients, delegate and supervise support personnel, and promote wellness and prevention services. Students are able to incorporate outcome measures into the evaluation process and suggest specific measures useful for their particular clinical setting. Students will perform an in-service during this clinical experience and communicate regularly with DCE via email to promote reflective thinking during clinical experience. . Prerequisites: Third Year Fall Courses

    10 credits, S/F graded

    HAY 694 - Clinical Internship IV

    A twelve week full-time capstone clinical experience. A licensed physical therapist is responsible for supervision during the learning experience. Students will render evidence-based practice and perform as an entry-level physical therapist upon completion of this clinical experience. Students are expected to fully participate in all aspects of physical therapist's scope of practice including direct patient care, documentation, consultation, education, critical inquiry, and administration in the clinical setting. perform as an entry-level physical therapist upon completion of this clinical experience. Students will perform an in-service during this clinical experience and communicate regularly with DCE via email to promote reflective thinking during clinical experience. Student will explore an area of interest outside patient management through the completion of a project designed to meet the needs of the clinical site in coordination with the DCE and clinical site CCCE. Prerequisites: Third Year Summer and Fall Courses; HAY 693

    12 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HAY 699 - Clinical Continuation

    This course is for physical therapy students continuing with clinical.

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HBA 461 - Regional Human Anatomy

    An overview of the gross anatomy of the human body. Dissection of the entire human body. Includes neuroanatomy. Associated course fee - $88.00. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor for non-Health Sciences students.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor for non-Health Sciences students.5 credits

    HBA 540 - Human Anatomy for Physical Therapists

    A lecture and laboratory course that includes dissections of the entire human body. The course is organized in three modules: (1) thorax and abdomen, (2) head and neck, including neuroanatomy, and (3) limbs. It covers regional and conceptual information on the gross anatomy of all organ systems in the human body. Prerequisite: permission of instructor for students that are not enrolled in Stony Brooks Physical Therapy Program.

    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor for students that are not enrolled in Stony Brooks Physical Therapy Program.6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBA 542 - Advanced Human Anatomy for Physical Therapists

    Regional approach to the gross anatomy of the lower limb for physical therapy graduate students (DPT). The course is presented in conjunction with HYA519, Kinesiology for Physical Therapists. This module will offer an exopanded view of the functional anatomy and arthrology of the hip, thigh, leg and foot. Labs will be three hours, one day per week. Enrollment will be limited to DPT students.

    0 credit, S/U grading

    HBA 561 - Human Gross Anatomy

    A lecture and laboratory course that includes dissections of the entire human body. The course is organized in three modules: (1) thorax and abdomen, (2) head and neck, including neuronatomy, and (3) limbs. It covers regional and conceptual information on the gross anatomy of all organ systems in the human body. Prerequisite: permission of instructor for students that are not enrolled in Stony Brook's Occupational Therapy, Physician Assistant or Respiratory Therapy programs.

    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor for students that are not enrolled in Stony Brook's Occupational Therapy, Physician Assistant or Respiratory Therapy programs.Summer, 5 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBP 310 - Pathology

    A study of the basic mechanisms of disease and the pathophysiology of the important human illnesses. Primarily for Health Sciences Center students; others admitted with special permission.

    3 credits

    HBP 511 - Pathobiology for Graduate Health Care Practitioners

    For graduate students who have obtained primary health care baccalaureate degrees through the case study approach. Covers the underlying principles of modern experimental pathology. Focuses on the clinical aspects of the body system, including relevant underlying biochemistry, structure, or pathophysiology at the organ, tissue, cell or molecular level.

    Fall and Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HBY 350 - Physiology

    The normal functioning of human tissues and organs and their regulation by the nervous and endocrine systems. Special emphasis is given to physiological control systems and the preservation of the constancy of the internal environment. Lectures, conferences, demonstrations. Only for Health Sciences Center students.

    4 credits

    HBY 501 - Physiology

    Introduces normal function of human tissues and organs and their regulation by nervous and endocrine systems. Emphasizes the organization and function of physiological control systems and the maintenance of a constant internal environment. Enrollment restricted to fully matriculated graduate students, with permission of instructor. Only Fall.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 500 - Healthcare Delivery System

    Focuses on historic and current issues that impact the United States healthcare delivery system with a primary focus on how healthcare is delivered, organized, governed, and financed. There will be an overview of special populations and major diseases including epidemics, chronic illness, and acute illness, and the interrelated concepts of access, quality, and cost. Emphasizes the influence of an evolving healthcare delivery system on the practice of health informatics including meaningful use, Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH).

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 501 - Biomedical and Health Informatics Essentials

    Provides broad but significant immersion into the field of biomedical and health informatics. Emphasizes the clinical flow of data (acquisition, use, and storage of information in healthcare), biomedical research, informatics and public health, decision and cognitive science. Explores electronic health records, personal health records, personalized medicine, imaging, telemedicine, concepts of meaningful use, Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH), and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Includes hands-on experience in the use of an electronic health record system.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 502 - Health Information Systems and HIT Essentials

    Provides broad but significant immersion into the fields of health information systems and health information technology (HIT). Emphasizes systems analysis, clinical decision-support, integrated networking and distributed computing technologies, telemedicine applications, mobile applications, cloud computing, architecture and infrastructures, and database and systems administration.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 503 - Regulations, Confidentiality, Privacy and Security

    Provides foundational knowledge in the laws, regulations, policies and procedures related to the confidentiality, privacy, and security on all levels of health-related information and infrastructures. Emphasizes interoperability, HIPAA/HITECH Privacy Rule and Security Standards, Code Set Rules, meaningful use, and IT security forensics.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 504 - Database Design and Development for Health Informatics Professionals

    Covers relational database theory and development methodology. Emphasizes the progression through a health information systems development life cycle through the design, development, deployment, administration, testing, evaluation, and maintenance of a database. Introduces students to relational query languages (i.e. SQL).

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 505 - Leadership and Management Essentials

    Provides broad but significant immersion in organizational change, leadership, organizational behavior, project management and change management. Emphasizes healthcare project life-cycle, theoretical and applied strategies of managing change, communication and group dynamics, systems thinking, and strategic planning.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 506 - Research Design and Methodology for the Health Informatics Professionals

    Provides in-depth overview of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research designs and methodologies. The student will analyze and evaluate the philosophical foundations, characteristics, strengths, and limitations of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research designs and methodologies most appropriate to the practice of health informatics. Emphasizes critical review and techniques of applied research and evaluation.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 507 - Statistics for Health Informatics Professionals

    Explores quantitative data analysis techniques utilized in patient safety research. Includes descriptive, inferential, and correlational statistics. Students will use available computer programs to conduct a variety of descriptive, inferential, and correlational statistical tests.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 520 - Program Management and Administration for Privacy and Security

    Provides significant immersion into the knowledge and skills related to administration and management of healthcare organizations privacy and security programs. Emphasizes development of policies, protocols, and procedures for risk assessment and mitigation, integrity, and confidentiality of the patient, provider, employee, and business information. Prerequisites: HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 507

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 521 - Physical and Technical Safeguards of Health Information

    Provides significant immersion into the knowledge and skills related to the physical and technical privacy and security safeguards utilized in all sectors of healthcare. Emphasizes risk assessment and mitigation, disaster recover, business continuity, and standards regarding the maintenance, safeguarding, authorization access, release, and disposal of personal and confidential information. Prerequisites: HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 508

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 522 - Forensic Analysis and Health Information Cybercrime

    Provides significant immersion into the knowledge and skills related to forensic science and its application to the healthcare sectors digital environments. Emphasizes health information cybercrime; methods to uncover, collect, protect, and document evidence; and tools, techniques, and procedures to perform computer and cybercrime investigations. Prerequisites: HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 509

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 523 - Legal and Regulatory Issues, External Environmental Assessment, Compliance

    Provides significant immersion into the knowledge and skills related to the legal and regulatory issues specific to security and privacy personnel, external environmental assessments, and compliance. Emphasizes development of policies and procedures to receive, verify, authorize, process, and document various information requests; incident response team; compliance issues; federal breach notifications; employee training; and patient services. Prerequisites: HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 510

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 530 - Clinical Decision Making and Process Improvement

    Provides in-depth immersion into the knowledge and skills required to implement effective clinical decision making systems and participate in the development of clinical process improvements that support effective, efficient, safe, timely, equitable, and patient-centered care. Summer and Fall courses. Prerequisites: Summer and Fall courses including HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 507.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 531 - Health Information Systems

    Provides in-depth immersion into the knowledge and skills required to participate in the development or selection of an information system for clinicians; prepare clinicians prior to implementation and support them during implementation and ongoing operation of clinical information system; and evaluate the effectiveness of a system in meeting clinical needs. Summer and Fall courses. Prerequisites: Summer and Fall courses including HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 507.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 532 - Leading and Managing Clinical Information Systems Change

    Provides in-depth immersion into the knowledge and skills required to lead, manage change, and promote adoption associated with implementing clinical information systems. Summer and Fall courses. Prerequisites: Summer and Fall courses including HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 507.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 540 - Health Data Management

    Provides significant immersion into the knowledge and skills of the health management domains of data structure, data analysis, and outcomes. Prerequisites: Summer and Fall courses including HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 507.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 541 - Information Technology and Systems

    Provides significant immersion into the knowledge and skills of the health management domains Healthcare Information Systems and Information Management Planning. Summer and Fall courses. Prerequisites: Summer and Fall courses including HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 507.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 542 - Advanced Organizational Leadership and Management

    Provides significant immersion into the knowledge and skills related to the health management domains of Leadership, Resource Management, and Education and Training. Summer and Fall courses. Prerequisites: Summer and Fall courses including HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 507.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 550 - Applied Healthcare Analytics

    Focuses on the design and implementation of analytics to aide in the evaluation of health in populations. Explores the role of the health care analyst and analytics in the improvement of healthcare delivery and outcomes. Consists of on-line lectures, videos, and hand on assignments with data set sand analytic models. Prerequisites: Summer and Fall Courses. Prerequisites: HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 507. Department permission required.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 551 - Big Data Technologies in Healthcare

    Focuses on new and emerging Big Data technologies in healthcare, and the technologies that are utilized to process and manipulate data. Technologies such as Facebook, Yahoo, Google, LinkedIn, Twitter, and the Electronic Health Record will be studied. Discusses how healthcare data is organized, processed and analyzed using MATLAB. Consists of four weeks of reading, on-line discussions and assignments, hand-on use of analytical tools for analysis and data extraction, and ten weeks of on-site lectures and hand-on lab sessions. Prerequisites: Summer and Fall Courses. Prerequisites: HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 507. Department permission required.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 552 - Healthcare Data Visualization

    Focuses on techniques and tools for designing and implementing effective visual representations of healthcare data. Students will learn how to analyze, parse, and represent quantitative and text data visually, and how to present data that is clutter free, engaging and easy to comprehend. Hands-on course utilizes Tableau as a presentation platform for the designing and building of data visualizations. Students will learn to express findings, answer questions, and to drive data supported decisions in healthcare. Consists of three weeks of campus lecture, twelve weeks of hand-on use of data visualization tools, assignments, lectures, and on-line discussions. Prerequisites: HHA 500, HHA 501, HHA 502, HHA 503, HHA 504, HHA 505, HHA 506, and HHA 507. Department permission required.

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 584 - Specialization Practicum I

    First course in a three part experiential learning sequence designed to provide significant hands-on immersion into the practice of Health Informatics. The 120 hour practicum requires students to apply knowledge and skills acquired during the core and specialization course work.Prerequisite: Department Consent Required

    Prerequisite(s): Department Consent Required4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 586 - Specialization Practicum II

    Second course in a three part experiential learning sequence designed to provide significant hands-on immersion into the practice of Health Informatics. This 180 hour practicum is a progressive experimental learning experience. Students are expected to demonstrate increasing proficiency of integration and application of didactic and experiential learning with the goal of demonstrating mastery in Health Informatics. Prerequisite: HHA 584

    Prerequisite(s): HHA 5846 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 588 - Specialization Practicum III

    Final course in a three part experiential learning sequence designed to provide significant hands-on immersion into the practice of Health Informatics. This 180 hour practicum is a progressive experimental learning experience. Students are expected to demonstrate increasing proficiency of integration and application of didactic and experiential learning with the goal of demonstrating mastery in Health Informatics. Prerequisite: HHA 586

    Prerequisite(s): HHA 5866 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHA 599 - Practicum Continuation

    This course is for Applied Health Informatics students continuing with Practicum.

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HHH 500 - The Health System

    Explores the United States Healthcare System and is designed to facilitate an understanding of the history, basic structures, and operations of this expansive, diverse, and complex system. Introduces healthcare systems models, current and future trends in healthcare delivery, and systems outcome issues encountered by healthcare administrators across health services markets. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one required synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (using Blackboard).

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 501 - Health Analytic Methods

    Explores the importance of data analytics and facilitates understanding of analytic foundations. Explores the use of descriptive and inferential statistical analysis, common spreadsheet techniques for organizing and interpreting data, summarizing data using quantitative and qualitative measures, interpret variability in data, perform and interpret hypothesis testing, calculate probability, and how to apply statistical methods to real world examples. Computer exercises utilizing Microsoft Excel will be used in analyzing data and graphics. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one required synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (using Blackboard).

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 506 - Health Quality and Performance Improvement

    Explores healthcare quality management methodologies and examines the impact on healthcare productivity, quality and patient safety. Students will understand and utilize the concepts of performance improvement and continuous process improvement to improve product and service quality and competitiveness. Presents the history of quality improvement in healthcare and how quality concepts may be applied to improve clinical outcomes, patient safety, patient satisfaction, financial outcomes and employee and physician satisfaction. Emphasizes the critical importance of data analytics to monitor performance improvement activities. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: Second Year Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): Second Year Fall Courses2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 508 - Human Resources Management in the Health Sector

    Explores the key and active role played by human resources in health services organizations. Introduces students to the role of the human resources function and to the challenges that health care managers and leaders will face. Emphasizes strategic human resources, talent management, performance management, the role of the regulatory environment in human resources and making the connection between financial and non-financial rewards and workforce management. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: Year One Courses

    Prerequisite(s): Year One Courses3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 510 - Health Finance and Accounting

    Provides broad but significant immersion into the requisite core knowledge and skills of financial management and accounting in the healthcare sector. Emphasis will include but not be limited to managerial and financial accounting, fiscal analysis, fiscal planning, and fiscal reporting. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: First Year Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Fall Courses4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 512 - Health Finance II

    Provides an advanced, case-based immersion into the core knowledge and skills of healthcare financial management. Emphasis will include but not be limited to the analysis of financial statement reports, balance sheets, statements of operation, statements of cash flow, bond ratings, strategic financial planning and the impact of the Affordable Care Act on healthcare finance. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: First Year Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Courses6 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 520 - Health Governance and Organizational Analysis

    Provides students immersion into the study of organizational behavior, integrated with the study of organizational theory, to develop evidence-based approaches to analyze, manage, and lead change within healthcare organizations. Emphasizes groups and teams, diversity and cultural competence, individual attitudes and perceptions, communication, organizational change, cognitive processes, leadership, power and influence, stress and well-being, conflict management, decision making and negotiation skills, motivation, and strategies to improve employee and organizational success. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: First Year Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Fall Courses4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 530 - Health Operations Management

    Explores the terminology and tools for identifying and applying appropriate operations management (OM), decision analysis (DA) and operations research (OR) techniques to problems in healthcare. Exposes students to OM, DA and OR techniques in order to have practical experience solving problems in planning, scheduling, resource allocation, procedural decisions, and measurement of health care processes. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: First Year Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Courses2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 536 - Health Law and Compliance

    Explores various legal issues in healthcare and examines the ways in which such topics are analyzed, discussed, and resolved through the lens of policy, ethics, governance and law. Emphasizes the legal aspects of healthcare cost allocation, patient and human rights cases, and research. Explores how legislation, public policy and society shape health law. Examines issues regarding the intersection of the legal system, compliance, ethics and governance in the health sector. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: First Year Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Fall Courses4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 540 - Health Management

    Explores the use of healthcare management techniques required for effective planning and decision-making by today's healthcare managers. Concepts and theories from the general management literature will be analyzed and used to respond to emerging issues in the health care industry related specifically to the delivery of high quality, effective, patient-centered care. Uses field-based examples to illustrate the tools available to improve the quality of organizational decisions and processes to achieve fiscal sustainability. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one required synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (using Blackboard).

    4 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 541 - Health Strategic Planning and Management

    Explores the fundamentals of strategic planning and leadership in the health sector. Emphasizes mission, vision, values, creating business plans and conducting strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analyses. Explores the impact of leadership style on the strategic planning process. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: Second Year Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): Second Year Fall Courses2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 542 - Health Leadership and Change: Comprehensive Capstone Project

    Provides an in depth examination of leadership theory and the essential qualities required to successfully lead in the fluid and changing healthcare environment. Explores the key characteristics of successful health leaders, including the values that guide personal and professional behavior through the lens of a team based, interactive capstone research project. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: Second Year Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): Second Year Fall Courses2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 564 - Health Technology and Information Management

    Explores the impact of business strategy, healthcare financing, stakeholders, measurement and user experience design on the successful adoption of healthcare information technologies (HIT). Examines the role of HIT in achieving institutional objectives, including improving quality of care, removing waste and enhancing healthcare system experience. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: First Year Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Courses3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 575 - Long-Term Care in the Health Sector

    Explores management techniques and standard practices in long-term care in the health sector. Emphasizes skilled nursing, home care, assisted living, adult day care, home health care and senior retirement communities. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: First Year Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Courses2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 585 - MHA Residency I: Communication Skills and Interpersonal Effectiveness

    This first of four in-person, faculty-led residential courses features an orientation to the MHA Program, including program faculty and members of the student cohort. Introduces the health industry, population health concepts, basic health management concepts, communication skills, importance of interpersonal relationships, professionalism and professional development. All aspects of this course will be delivered face-to-face, in person on campus.

    1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 586 - MHA Residency II: Professionalism and Ethics

    The second of four on-site, faculty-led residential courses features professionalism and ethics in the field of health management. Facilitates the application and integration of health management competencies gained in year one of coursework to realistic case studies using interdisciplinary team based methods. Students will continue to enhance communication skills, skills that encourage functional interdisciplinary teamwork and will develop presentation skills, problem solving skills, networking strategies, professional etiquette and have the opportunity to engage in professional development activities. Prerequisite: First Year Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Fall Courses1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 587 - MHA Residency III: Leadership and Change

    The third of four on-site, faculty-led residential courses features leadership and change in the field of health management. Facilitates the application and integration of health management competencies, gained in year one of coursework and practicum, to realistic case studies using interdisciplinary team based methods. Students will continue to enhance communication skills, skills that encourage functional interdisciplinary teamwork and will continue to develop presentation skills, problem solving skills, networking strategies, professional etiquette and professional development activities. Prerequisite: First Year Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Courses1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 588 - MHA Residency IV: Comprehensive Capstone Project Team Presentations and Portfolio Development

    The last of four on-site, faculty-led residential courses features comprehensive capstone project team presentations and portfolio development in the field of health management; and the opportunity to engage in an interactive presentation of their original research findings and recommendations to a panel of practicing health executives. Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback from and defend their positions to actively practicing health executives. Students will have an opportunity to integrate years one and two health management competencies in this realistic case study while engaging in interdisciplinary team based learning. Students will continue to enhance communication skills, skills that encourage functional interdisciplinary teamwork and will continue to develop presentation skills, problem solving skills, networking strategies, professional etiquette and professional development activities. Prerequisite: Second Year Fall Courses

    Prerequisite(s): Second Year Fall Courses1 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 589 - Health Management Practicum and Seminar I

    The first of two 90-hour field placements and accompanying faculty-led seminars that provide students with the opportunity to gain practical health management experience in the health services field. Placements strive to integrate administrative and management of health services by enhancing administrative skills under the direction and supervision of a faculty member and a knowledgeable mentor in an environment that promotes learning. Individual practicum placements will be completed on-site, in addition to an accompanying online seminar that will allow reflection and professional development based upon the individual experiences of students. Prerequisite: First Year Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Courses3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 590 - Health Management Practicum and Seminar II

    The second of two 90 hour field placements and accompanying faculty-led seminars that will provide students with opportunities to gain practical health management experience in the health services field. Placements strive to integrate administrative and management of health services by enhancing administrative skills under the direction and supervision of a faculty member and a knowledgeable mentor in an environment that promotes learning. Individual practicum placements will be completed on-site, in addition to an accompanying online seminar that will allow reflection and professional development based upon the individual experiences of students. Prerequisite: First Year Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Courses3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHH 599 - Physician Practice Management

    Explores the essential components of physician practice management including the structure and organization of solo practice and group practices. Includes operating and administrative issues, information management, health informatics, patient care systems, corporate compliance, physician credentialing, finance and management reporting, risk management, operations, practice valuation, marketing and planning, leadership, compensation, governance, billing, coding, medical malpractice, collections, reimbursement mechanisms, human resource management, physician compensation and quality of care. Explores the factors influencing physician practices, physician-hospital relationships, leadership and governance. All aspects of this course, with the exception of one optional synchronous class meeting, will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format (Blackboard). Prerequisite: First Year Courses

    Prerequisite(s): First Year Courses2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 500 - Fundamentals of Molecular Biology Techniques

    Covers main techniques used in molecular biology, including direct and amplified nucleic acid-based methods. Emphasizes basic principles behind each test, interpretation of results, advantages and limitations of each methods, and type of specimen required for each test. Addresses the importance of quality control, biosafety and proper decontamination procedures to ensure accurate data for proper patient diagnosis.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 510 - Advanced Molecular Biology Laboratory

    This 15-week laboratory course consists of a 6-hour weekly lab, during which the students perform hands-on activities covering the main molecular biology techniques used for the diagnosis of infectious and genetic diseases, determination of cancer markers, and forensic testing. Techniques include nucleic acid isolation, purification and quantification, DNA separation, amplification and sequencing. Prerequisite: HHM 500

    Prerequisite(s): HHM 5003 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 511 - Application of Molecular Biology in Diagnostics

    Introduces the applications of molecular biology techniques in diagnostics of various diseases. The students will learn the molecular mechanisms underlying infection by microorganisms, genetically inherited diseases as well as cancer, and how molecular techniques can help with the diagnosis and prognosis of these diseases. Addresses the advantages and limitations of different techniques available, as well as the importance of quality control. Prerequisite: HHM 500

    Prerequisite(s): HHM 5003 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 516 - Application of Molecular Biology in Research

    Focuses on various applications of molecular biology techniques in both basic and translational medical research. High emphasis will be placed on the understanding of the molecular pathways involved in various diseases, including cancer, genetically inherited diseases and infection by microorganisms. The students will learn how the power of molecular genetic analysis is used to identify, isolate and characterize genes that cause and contribute to the etiology of human diseases. Explains how various molecular biology techniques can be applied to diagnose diseases and to develop potential therapeutics. Discusses the advantages and limitations of different techniques, as well as the importance of quality control. Prerequisite: HHM 500, 510, 511

    Prerequisite(s): HHM 500, 510, 5113 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 520 - Flow Cytometry Laboratory

    This laboratory course consists of 30 hours of hands-on activities, and covers the main techniques used in the flow cytometry laboratory. This laboratory will be given once weekly, on weekends or weeknights. Students will perform numerous immunophenotyping techniques, including stem cell quantitation, hematologic and non-hematologic neoplasms, minimal residual disease, fetal hemoglobin and cell functional assays. Students will learn how to do quality assurance and instrumentation maintenance, and will gain hands-on experience with the application software used by flow cytometers. Prerequisite: HHM 500, 510, 511 Co-requisite: HHM 521

    Prerequisite(s): HHM 500, 510, 511 Co-requisite: HHM 5211 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 521 - Flow Cytometry Methods and Applications

    Introduces students to the applications of flow cytometry techniques and their applications in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases including leukemia and lymphoma, primary immunodeficiency diseases, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection detection of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, cytometry clinical transplantation, leukocyte functional assays, cell apoptosis, CD34 positive stem cell enumeration, immunologic dysfunction, and DNA and cell proliferation measurements in cancer cells. Prerequisite: HHM 500, 510, 511 Co-Requisite: HHM 520

    Prerequisite(s): HHM 500, 510, 511 Co-Requisite: HHM 5202 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 531 - Cytogenetics Methodology and Applications

    Focuses on the impact of chromosome abnormalities on the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cytogenetic syndromes. Covers basic cytogenetic concepts and laboratory techniques required for the detection of various diseases, including sex chromosome abnormalities, the fragile X syndrome, and structural and numerical chromosome abnormalities, with special emphasis on the mechanisms underlying these syndromes. Prerequisite: HHM 500, 510, 511, 516, 520, 521, 540, 545

    Prerequisite(s): HHM 500, 510, 511, 516, 520, 521, 540, 5452 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 540 - Laboratory Operations in Molecular Biology

    Covers the main principles of laboratory standards used in the molecular diagnostics, including pre- and post-analytical operations, test result documentation, quality assurance and quality control. Considers the importance of safety, regulation and standards.Prerequisite: HHM 500, 510, 511, 516, 520, 521

    Prerequisite(s): HHM 500, 510, 511, 516, 520, 5212 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 545 - Ethics in the Laboratory

    Reviews professional guidelines for ethical conduct and approaches to ethical dilemmas for laboratory scientists. Explores ethical issues, including responsible research conduct, good laboratory practice, and research with human subjects. Discusses ethical principles in genetics and genetic engineering; advance directives, confidentiality, informed consent, patient rights, and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). All aspects of this class will be presented and discussed via a distance learning format using Blackboard. Prerequisite: HHM 500, 510, 511, 516, 520, 521

    Prerequisite(s): HHM 500, 510, 511, 516, 520, 5212 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 551 - Research Methods and Scientific Writing

    Introduces students to the basic concepts of biomedical research. Emphasizes critical evaluation of published scientific literature, and how to plan, design and conduct a research study. Presents the proper use of the different statistical methods required to analyze research data. Teaches students how to communicate effectively as scientists by writing high quality scientific papers, giving oral presentations, and putting together a research proposal. The students will apply these concepts to their own writing. Prerequisite: HHM 500, 510, 511, 516, 520, 521, 540, 545

    Prerequisite(s): HHM 500, 510, 511, 516, 520, 521, 540, 5453 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 570 - Journal Club on Medical Molecular Biology

    Students participate in critical analysis of scientific journal articles from a diverse set of topics related to the field of molecular biology including molecular diagnostics, molecular microbiology, cancer research, genetically inherited diseases and genomics, among others. In each session, a student presents the essential information of the paper including background, significance, hypothesis, experimental methods, results and conclusions by means of a narrated Powerpoint presentation. Following the presentation, the rest of the class discuss and analyze the content of the paper in an online discussion forum. Prerequisite: HHM 500, 510, 511, 516, 520, 521, 540, 545

    Prerequisite(s): HHM 500, 510, 511, 516, 520, 521, 540, 5451 credit, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 581 - Clinical Practicum in Molecular Diagnostics

    This is a two week fulltime practicum in a Clinical Molecular Diagnostics lab designed to give students supervised practical application of what was learned in classes. The students will be provided with on-the-job training while experiencing the work environment in a clinical diagnostic laboratory. Prerequisite: HHM fall year two courses.

    Prerequisite(s): HHM fall year two courses.2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 583 - Clinical Practicum in Flow Cytometry

    This is a two week fulltime practicum in a Clinical Flow Cytometry lab designed to give students supervised practical application of what was learned in classes. The students will be provided with on-the-job training while experiencing the work environment in a clinical diagnostic laboratory. This will be repeatable course, for additional course credits. Prerequisite: HHM fall year two courses.

    Prerequisite(s): HHM fall year two courses.2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 585 - Clinical Practicum in Cytogenetics

    This is a two week fulltime practicum in a cytogenetics diagnostics lab designed to give students supervised practical application of what was learned in classes. The students will be provided with on-the-job training while experiencing the work environment in a clinical diagnostic laboratory. Prerequisite: HHM fall year two courses.

    Prerequisite(s): HHM fall year two courses.2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHM 596 - Capstone Project in Medical Molecular Biology

    Culminating experience designed to for students to choose a topic of interest within the area of molecular diagnostics, flow cytometry, or cytogenetics and further investigate it by means of a systemic literature review. Topics can be problems identified during clinical practice or learned in classes. Students will need to develop a comprehensive proposal that will be reviewed by faculty. Prerequisite: HHM fall year two courses.

    Prerequisite(s): HHM fall year two courses.2 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HHO 322 - Instrumentation in Polysomnography

    Provides a fundamental understanding and practical application of various instruments used in the sleep laboratory setting. Discusses use, function, indications, contraindications, cleaning, and proper trouble shooting techniques of the various instruments with hands on practice during class. Covers the theory and practical application of instrumentation and sensors utilized in the sleep laboratory. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program2 credits

    HHO 324 - Therapeutic Modalities in Sleep Medicine

    Provides the student with a thorough understanding of various therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of sleep disorders. Includes indications, contraindications and protocols for the titration of various forms of noninvasive ventilation including Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP); Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure (Bi-level); Auto-Servo Ventilation (SV); and oxygen therapy. Discusses Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT); phototherapy; chronotherapy; positional therapy; and pharmacological treatment. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 322

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 3223 credits

    HHO 326 - Introduction to Dental Sleep Medicine

    Covers basic principles of dental sleep medicine and oral appliance therapy as a therapeutic option for the management of sleep disorder breathing. The student will gain knowledge of the pathophysiology of sleep disordered breathing, anatomy and physiology of the head and neck, and dental anatomy and occlusion. Discusses theory, indications, contraindications, the risks, benefits, and potential side effects of oral appliance therapy. Students will learn about dental impressions and the construction of oral appliances, appliance selection, appliance insertion, and patient management. Presents protocol and use of oral appliance titration in the sleep lab setting, combination therapy of oral appliances with Positive Airway Pressure (PAP), and the implementation of alternative dental therapies. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program HAT 320, HAT 306, HAT 470, HHO 322

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program HAT 320, HAT 306, HAT 470, HHO 3224 credits

    HHO 342 - Sleep Disorder Pathophysiology

    Provides an understanding of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD). Reviews currently accepted sleep disorders including the names; alternate names; diagnostic criteria; features; clinical and pathophysiological subtypes; predisposing and precipitating factors; onset; course; complications; objective findings; and current therapies. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 322

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 3223 credits

    HHO 420 - Polysomnographic Technology Management

    Provides advanced understanding of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) guidelines for sleep facility accreditation and management. Includes standards and policies related to personnel; patient care; equipment; record storage; staging and scoring of sleep studies; and report generation. Discusses emergency policies and procedures, quality assurance programs, and facility layouts. Upon successful completion of this course student would understand the daily operations and functions of the sleep center or laboratory at a managerial level. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HAT 470

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HAT 4703 credits

    HHO 430 - Pediatric Polysomnography

    Provides a thorough understanding of pediatric polysomnography. Includes normal sleep across the various age groups; proper clinical evaluation of the pediatric patient; testing procedures; differential diagnosis of pediatric sleep disorders; and appropriate therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 342

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 3423 credits

    HHO 440 - Introduction to Electroencephalography

    Provide the student with a basic understanding of Electroencephalography (EEG). Topics include terminology; technical specifications; instrumentation; recording specifications; and currently accepted standards and guidelines for various diagnostic EEG procedures. Students will gain knowledge and experience in evaluating normal and abnormal EEGs. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HAT 470, HHO 322

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HAT 470, HHO 3223 credits

    HHO 460 - Polysomnographic Technology Board Review

    Designed to improve students' critical thinking skills and prepare them for the Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists (BRPT) exam. Students will learn about the professions credentialing levels and requirements as well as the New York State Office of Professions licensing system. Includes mock exams including sample exams offered by the BRPT. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 430

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 4301 credit

    HHO 470 - Basic Polysomnographic Technology Clinical

    Provides full time training in the basics of polysomnographic technology. It familiarizes students with instrumentation; setup and calibration; recording and monitoring techniques; documentation; professional issues; and patient-technologist interactions related to polysomnographic technology. Presents opportunities to observe, perform (under supervision), and evaluate sleep studies. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HAT 470

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HAT 4704 credits

    HHO 471 - Intermediate Polysomnographic Technology Clinical

    Provides full time training in Intermediate polysomnographic technology including implementation and titration of oxygen therapy and positive airway pressure (PAP). Covers different modes of PAP therapy including Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP); Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure (bi-level); and Bi-level Auto-AV ventilation. These therapeutic modalities will enhance the students understanding of the various forms of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and the appropriate treatment and recommended protocols. Provides patient contact including patient education and proper mask fitting techniques. Presents opportunities to observe, perform (under supervision) and evaluate therapeutic sleep studies. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 324, HHO 470

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 324, HHO 4704 credits

    HHO 472 - Advanced Polysomnographic Technology Clinical

    This full time clinical provides training following the AASM Manual for the Scoring of Sleep and Associated Events. The clinical will provide experience in report generation of diagnostic polysomnograms, PAP titrations, and oxygen titrations. Students will observe, assist, perform (under supervision) and evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic sleep studies. This clinical provides contact time for students with physicians, laboratory manager(s), and patients.Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 470, HHO 471

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 470, HHO 4714 credits

    HHO 476 - Pediatric Polysomnographic Clinical

    Provides full time clinical training in pediatric polysomnography. Familiarizes students with instrumentation setup and calibration; recording and monitoring techniques; documentation; professional issues; and patient-technologist interactions related to pediatric polysomnography. It provides the student opportunities to interact and develop their communication skills for educating the patient, the patient's family and/or legal guardian. Presents opportunities to observe, perform (under supervision) and evaluate pediatric sleep studies. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 430

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 4303 credits

    HHO 479 - Clinical Teaching in Polysomnographic Technology

    Full time clinical provides the student teacher an opportunity to develop and use educational skills and techniques in the clinical setting. Builds upon educational techniques covered HAT 410. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HAT 410, HHO 470, HHO 471, HHO 472

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HAT 410, HHO 470, HHO 471, HHO 4724 credits

    HHO 480 - Basic Electroencephalography Clinical

    Provides full time clinical training in the basics of electroneurodiagnostic technology. Familiarizes students with instrumentation setup and calibration; recording and monitoring techniques; documentation; professional issues; and patient-technologist interactions related to electroneurodiagnostic technology. Students will observe, assist, perform (under supervision) electroencephalograms. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 440

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 4403 credits

    HHO 488 - Polysomnographic Technology Management Clinical

    Provides full time clinical training in daily operations of a sleep disorders facility including the patient flow process from acceptance guidelines to follow-up care. Exposes student to various quality assurance programs, facility policies and procedures, archiving data, interscorer reliability, and patient education in a sleep disorder facility. Prerequisite: Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 420

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Upper Division Polysomnographic Program; HHO 4204 credits

    HSC 500 - Health, Sciences and Society

    Interdisciplinary course for HSC students (Nursing, Social Welfare, Dental Medicine, Health Technology and Management, Medicine and Public Health). Topics include communication, health economics, scope of practice, ethics, law, policy, public health and medical informatics.

    3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

    HTM 39 - Radiologic Technology Program

    This course is offered as a continuation of the Health Science major concentration in Radiologic Technology. The course contains both a clinical and didactic component, and satisfies the clinical requirements necessary to be eligible for the national registry and certification exams as well as NYSDOH licensing.

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HTM 49 - Radiation Therapy Program

    This course is offered as a continuation of the Health Science major concentration in Radiation Therapy. The course contains both a clinical and didactic component, and satisfies the clinical requirements necessary to be eligible for the national registry and certification exams.

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HTM 59 - Nuclear Medicine Technology Program

    This course is offered as a continuation of the Health Science major concentration in Nuclear Medicine Technology. The course contains both a clinical and didactic component, and satisfies the clinical requirements necessary to be eligible for the national registry and certification exams.

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HTM 69 - Medical Dosimetry Program

    This course is offered as a continuation of the Health Science major concentration in Medical Dosimetry. The course contains both a clinical and didactic component.

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HTM 79 - EMT-Paramedic Program

    The EMT-Paramedic training program is designed to train effective and compassionate paramedics in accordance with standards established by the United States Department of Transportation. Upon successful completion of the program, students will be eligible to take examinations for national and New York State certification

    0 credit, S/F graded

    HTM 99 - Anesthesia Technology Program

    This course is offered as a continuation of the Health Science major concentration in Anesthesia Technology. The course contains both a clinical and didactic component, and satisfies the clinical requirements necessary to be eligible for the national registry and certification exams.

    0 credit, S/F graded
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