Health Sciences Bulletin

School of Health and Technology Management

  • Applied Health Informatics, MS

    program in Applied health informatics leading to a master of science degree 

    Program Director: Carmen McCoy

    The School of Health Technology and Management offers a Master of Science degree in Applied Health Informatics (MS/AHI).  The MS/AHI is a full-time, 15 month, 52 credit degree program offered at the Stony Brook Southampton campus. Students enroll in two traditional 15 week fall and spring semesters and four 6-7 week summer sessions.  Students are expected to complete the degree program within 15 months. The graduate program was designed to appeal to clinically prepared health care graduates, computer science graduates and non-clinical health-related graduates.

    The curriculum was developed with input from regional CIOs, health IT hiring managers, and national experts to ensure that graduates have the knowledge, skills and competencies required to work in the healthcare industry. The MS/AHI curriculum provides broad knowledge and skills of health IT and in-depth study in one specialty field in health IT.  In addition, students complete 480 hours of practicum experience at large healthcare centers, community-based health care organizations, or with vendors in the region.  The practicum provides students with on-the-job-training to build their resumes with work experience.   The MS/AHI curriculum:

    • Fosters critical thinking, evidence-based practice, leadership and professionalism with an emphasis on the development of professional knowledge, skills and competencies that are valued and needed by healthcare organizations.
    • Utilizes problem-based learning, case studies, and student presentations as instructional methodologies.
    • Focuses on the application of health informatics with the primary purpose of responding to the high demand workforce needs.
    • Includes a 16 credit internship which will provide the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the curriculum and build skills and competencies that will enhance the students' ability to find gainful employment in the region. 

    Program Requirements 

    The MS/AHI curriculum includes a core sequence of courses (24 credits), as a foundational base of knowledge, skills, and competencies in Health Informatics put forth by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics Education (CAHIIM), taken during the summer I, II and fall semesters. Students then select a specialization of study (12 credits) for the spring semester in Knowledge Management and Leadership, Clinical Informatics, or Data Analytics. Each specialization requires students to complete 16 credits of practicum courses.  Practicum I (4 credits) is completed during the spring semester with the specialization courses and practicum II & III (12 credits) are completed during summer sessions I & II.

    Admissions Requirements 

    The MS in Applied Health Informatics accepts applicants for admission each summer.  The program admission requirements are as follows:

    • A baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university
    • An overall 3.0 undergraduate GPA
    • Three letters of recommendation
    • Essay demonstrating an in-depth understanding of, and commitment to, this dynamic profession

    Note: Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required for admission

    For applicants with an overall GPA of less than 3.0, but substantive coursework (minimum of 14 credits) that is directly applicable to the study of health informatics, applications will be evaluated by faculty based on the GPA of this coursework to be considered for conditional admission. If by the completion of the first enrolled semester, a conditionally admitted student is able to maintain a 3.0 graduate GPA, the applicant will be recommended for full admission to the master’s degree program.

    Required Core Curriculum 

    The core curriculum is common to all students regardless of specialization. The core curriculum is taken during summer sessions and fall semester.

    Course # Title Credits
    HHA 500 Health Care Delivery Systems
    HHA 501 Biomedical and Health Informatics Essentials
    HHA 502 Health Information Systems and HIT
    HHA 503 Regulations, Confidentiality, Privacy and Security
    HHA 504 Database Design and Development for Health Informatics Professionals
    HHA 505 Leadership and Management Essentials
    HHA 506 Research Design and Methodology for the Health Informatics Professionals
    HHA 507 Statistics for Health Informatics Professionals

    Specialization Curriculum

    Students select a specialization of study in one of the three specialty areas below.  

    Clinical Informatics Specialization Curriculum

    The goal of this specialization is to develop the knowledge, skills, and competencies required of clinical informatics personnel. The curriculum aligns with domains and learning outcomes put forth by Gardner, et al. (2009) in the Journal of American Medical Informatics Association‘s article entitled, core content for the subspecialty of clinical informatics.

    Course # Title Credits
    HHA 530 Clinical Decision Making and Process Improvement 
    HHA 531 Health Information Systems
    HHA 532 Leading and Managing Clinical Information Systems Change
    HHA 584 Specialization Practicum I
    HHA 586 Specialization Practicum II
    HHA 588 Specialization Practicum III


    Knowledge Management and Leadership Specialization Curriculum

    The goal of this specialization is to develop the knowledge, skills, and competencies required by leaders in Health Informatics. The curriculum aligns with domains and learning outcomes put forth by AHIMA Competencies for Master-level HIM.

    Course # Title Credits
    HHA 540 Health Data Management
    HHA 541 Information Technology and System
    HHA 542 Advanced Organizational Leadership and Management
    HHA 584 Specialization Practicum I
    HHA 586 Specialization Practicum II
    HHA 588 Specialization Practicum III

    Data Analytics Specialization Curriculum

    The goal of this specialization is to develop the knowledge, skills, and competencies required to manipulate, analyze, interpret and present healthcare data using application software. This specialization was developed by national leaders in the field. Note: Departmental approval required to register for this specialization.

    Course # Title Credits
    HHA 550 Applied Healthcare Analytics
    HHA 551 Big Data Technologies in Healthcare
    HHA 552 Healthcare Data Visualization

    Practicum Courses

    The practicum I is taken during the spring semester, practicums II & III are offered during summer sessions.

    Course # Title Credits
    HHA 550 Specialization Practicum I
    HHA 586 Specialization Practicum II
    HHA 588 Specialization Practicum III

     

     

  • Athletic Training, BS

    Program in Athletic Training Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

    The Athletic Training Program is no longer accepting applications for admission.

    Program Chair: Kathryn Koshansky 

    The Athletic Training Program, offered by the School of Health Technology and Management, is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

    The program is designed for students interested in becoming an Athletic Trainer (AT).  Athletic trainers are healthcare professionals who collaborate with physicians to optimize activity and participation of patients and clients. As members of the sports medicine team, athletic trainers specialize in the prevention, clinical diagnosis and intervention of emergency, acute and chronic medical conditions involving impairment, functional limitations and disabilities. Athletic Training is recognized by the American Medical Association (AMA) as a healthcare profession.  Athletic trainers’ work settings can include high schools, colleges, universities, professional sports teams, hospitals, rehabilitation clinics, physicians’ offices, corporate and industrial institutions, the military, and the performing arts.

    The student’s comprehensive professional preparation is directed toward the development of specified competencies in the following content areas: Evidence–Based Practice, Prevention and Health Promotion, Clinical Examination and Diagnosis, Acute Care of Injury and Illness, Therapeutic Interventions, Psychological Strategies and Referral, Healthcare Administration, and Professional Development and Responsibility. Formal instruction involves teaching of required subject matter in structured classroom, clinical, and laboratory environments. All students are required to fulfill their clinical education requirements under the direct supervision of a preceptor. Clinical education provides the student with authentic, real-time opportunities to practice and integrate athletic training knowledge, skills, and clinical abilities, including decision-making and professional behaviors required of the profession in order to develop proficiency as an athletic trainer.

    The curriculum prepares students for the Board of Certification, Inc. (BOC) examination. Upon passing this examination, an individual may apply for certification by the New York State Education Department Office of Professions. In addition to the baccalaureate degree, the school’s Certificate of Professional Achievement in Athletic Training is awarded upon satisfactory completion of all required course work.

    Admission Requirements

    The Athletic Training Program is no longer accepting applications for admission.

    Candidates for the athletic training education program must meet the upper division admission requirements of the School of Health Technology and Management, including a minimum of 60 credits of required, recommended, and elective courses. The requirements may be fulfilled through previously completed college studies. In addition to the general academic requirements for junior status in the School of Health Technology and Management, the program requires candidates to meet the school’s natural science requirement. The following course work require minimum grades of “C”: 3 credits of Introduction to Psychology; 3 additional credits of 200-400 level social behavioral sciences; *8 credits biology (to include 1 course in human physiology); *4 credits chemistry; *4 credits  physics; 3 credits  calculus; 3 credits statistics; 3 credits medical terminology; 2 credits nutrition; and 2 credits Supplement Use in Sports (only available online through Stony Brook University). *Science classes must have labs.  Natural science courses (biology, chemistry, physics) less than 10 years old are preferred.  *Please note that Stony Brook University may require prerequisites for some of these courses.

    • 3 credits of introductory (SBS) social & behavioral sciences (PSY 103-Introduction to Psychology (or equivalent) with a minimum grade of “C”)
    • 3 credits of intermediate or higher level (200-400) of social and behavioral sciences (SBS+)

    The following courses require a minimum grade of “C”:

    • PSY 103 - Introduction to Psychology (SBS)
    • CHEM 131 - General Chemistry IB (SNW)
    • CHEM 133 - General Chemistry Laboratory I (SNW)
    • BIO 202 - Fundamentals of Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology (STEM+)
    • BIO 204 - Fundamentals of Scientific Inquiry in the Biological Sciences I
    • PHY 121/123 - Physics for the Life Sciences I/Lab (SNW) or PHY 113/115 - Physics of Sport/Lab (SNW)
    • BIO 203 - Fundamentals of Biology: Cellular and Organ Physiology (STEM+) or HAN 202 - Human Anatomy and Physiology for Health Science II (STEM+)
    • MAT 125 - Calculus A (QPS)
    • AMS 102, 110 or PSY 201- Statistics (QPS)
    • HAN 312 - Medical Terminology and Human Anatomy
    • HAL 376 – Introduction to Nutrition
    • HAL 375 - Supplement Use in Sports

    The program also requires applicants to successfully complete each of the following courses with a minimum grade of "B":

    • HAL 205 Introduction to Athletic Training (CER, GLO)
    • HAL 210 Emergency Care of Athletic Injuries (CER)
    • HAL 300 Kinesiology
    • HAN 200 - Human Anatomy and Physiology for Health Science I (SNW) or ANP 300 - Human Anatomy (STEM+)

    Candidates must complete required course work by the end of the spring term of the year for which the application is made. Certification in healthcare provider cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BLS) is required. A minimum of a 2.5 cumulative grade point average is required. Fifty observational hours with an athletic trainer is also required for admission.

    All students, except freshmen declared majors, must submit an online application by the deadline (March 15th) of the year they wish to enter. The application process includes an interview with the ATP Admissions Committee.

    Freshmen Declared Four-Year Major

    Stony Brook freshmen can declare the four-year athletic training major by contacting the Athletic Training program at (631) 632-2837 and meeting with the program chair.   Students successfully completing the lower division component of the major are advanced to the upper division professional program.  Freshmen declared  majors must successfully complete 60 credits and program prerequisites by the end of the sophomore year, and have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 and a *science GPA of 2.5.

    In addition to general coursework and program specific courses, the freshman declared major student must meet the academic standards listed above and complete HAL 205 Introduction to Athletic Training (GLO) with a minimum grade of B+.

    Program Requirements

    Athletic training students must complete the following required courses:

    Professional Courses (Year One)
    Course # Title Credits
    HAL 305 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 3
    HAL 306 Prophylactic Taping, Bracing and Equipment Fitting 2
    HAL 320 Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis of the Lumbar Spine and Lower Extremity 3
    HAL 321 Clinical Evaluation and Diagnosis of the Head, Cervical Spine and Upper Extremity 3
    HAL 345 Therapeutic Modalities 4
    HAL 360 Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries 4
    HAL 370 Exercise Physiology 4
    HAL 481 Athletic Training Practicum I 3-6
    HAL 482 Athletic Training Practicum II 7
    HAL 483 Athletic Training Practicum III    7
    Professional Courses (Year Two)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAL 351  Research Methods and Biostatistics  3
     HAL 355  General Medical Conditions and Disabilities in the Physically Active  4
     HAL 435  Organization and Administration in Athletic Training  3
     HAL 450  Senior Research Seminar in Athletic Training  3
     HAL 460  BOC Exam Primer  1
     HAL 484  Athletic Training Practicum IV  3-6
     HAL 485  Athletic Training Practicum V  7
     HAL 486  Athletic Training Practicum VI  7
     HAL 499  Athletic Training Teaching Practicum  2

    Special Academic Requirements

    An Athletic Training student will fulfill the upper division writing requirement by successful completion of the research paper for HAL 450.

    Professional courses (HAL) must be taken in a sequential manner. A minimum grade of C is required in each course. Students who receive a grade of “C-“, must remediate the insufficient grade before progressing on to the next course in sequence. Students who receive a grade of “D+” or below must retake the course and achieve a minimum grade of C before progressing to the next course in the sequence.  Professional HAL courses may only be repeated once. Failure to obtain the grade of “C” or higher in two attempts may result in the recommendation for termination from the program.

  • Clinical Laboratory Sciences, BS

    Program in Clinical Laboratory Sciences Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

    Program Chair: Kathleen Finnegan

    The Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences offers an upper-division program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. Stony Brook freshmen are given the option to declare clinical laboratory sciences as a lower-division major. A double major in clinical laboratory sciences and biology is available. A part time online-hybrid program is also available. Clinical laboratory scientists utilize a wide variety of sophisticated equipment and skills to perform tests that analyze specimens to produce data for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease. Many of the same tests are used for organ transplants, therapeutic drug monitoring, crime investigation, genetic studies, and research. The program now offers three specializations (Forensic Medical Diagnostics, Laboratory Information Systems, and Clinical Cytogenetics) within its traditional clinical laboratory curriculum. 

    The majority of clinical laboratory scientists work in hospital laboratories; however, many job opportunities exist in other areas such as research and development, industry, sales and technical services, health departments, and computer firms. Competitive salaries, career advancement, and a versatile background make the clinical laboratory professional well-equipped to enter a variety of scientific fields. The program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS), located at 5600 N. River Road, Suite 720 Rosemont, IL 60018, (773) 714-8880. In addition to the baccalaureate degree, the school’s Certificate of Professional Achievement in Clinical Laboratory Sciences is awarded upon satisfactory completion of all required coursework. The Clinical Laboratory Sciences program is a New York State licensure qualifying program. 

    Admission Requirements

    Candidates for the clinical laboratory sciences program must meet the upper-division admission requirements of the School of Health Technology and Management. The requirements may be fulfilled through previously completed college studies.

    In addition to the general academic requirements for junior status in the School of Health Technology and Management, the Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences requires candidates to meet the department’s natural science requirement by successfully completing 8 credits of biology with laboratories, 3 credits of microbiology, 12 credits of chemistry with laboratories (including one course in organic chemistry), and 3 credits of statistics.

    In order to be eligible for enrollment to the specializations, students must complete all the requirements for the Clinical Laboratory Sciences degree and the applicable requirements associated with the individual specialization. An Introduction to Computer Science course is recommended as an additional prerequisite for the Laboratory Information Systems specialization. A genetics course is recommended for the Clinical Cytogenetics specialization.

    All prerequisite and recommended science courses must be designated for science majors. Stony Brook freshmen are able to declare a lower-division clinical laboratory sciences major. To advance to junior status, they must meet the requirements described above, and successfully complete HAD 210 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Sciences with a minimum grade of A- .

    *A conditional acceptance may be granted if, upon the judgment of department faculty, there are exceptional circumstances concerning department prerequisites.

    Program Requirements

    All clinical laboratory sciences students must complete the following courses for successful completion of the upper-division program leading to the baccalaureate degree. 

    Basic Science Courses/Other Health Technology and Management Courses (Junior and Senior Year)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAS 332  Management Concepts for Health Professionals   1
     HBP 310   Pathology   3
     HAD 324 (for HHCZB students only)  Pathology  3
     HBY 350 (class of 2018)  Physiology  4
     HAD 350 (for HHCZB students only)  Systems Physiology   4 
     HAS 355 (replaces HBY 350 effective fall 2017 )  Integrative Systems in Physiology  4
    Professional Courses (Junior Year)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAD 313  Clinical Biochemistry I  3.5
     HAD 315  Hematology I  4
     HAD 330  Foundations in Phlebotomy  1.5
     HAD 331  Introductory Biochemistry   3
     HAD 340   Foundations in Clinical Laboratory Sciences  1.5
     HAD 335  Medical Ethics   1
     HAD 363  Computer Applications in Clinical Laboratory Sciences  2
     HAD 380  Clinical Microbiology I  4
     HAD 381  Clinical Microbiology II  4
    HAD 425  Parasitology/Mycology  3
    HAD 397  Clinical Microbiology Practicum**  6
    HAD 398  Clinical Hematology Practicum I**  3
    Professional Courses (Senior Year)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAD 351  Research Literacy and Design  1
     HAD 403  Medical Molecular Biology  3
     HAD 411   Clinical Biochemistry II  2.5
     HAD 412  Clinical Biochemistry III  2
     HAD 414   Coagulation, Urinalysis and Body Fluids  4
     HAD 415 Applied Immunology   3 
     HAD 416  Immunohematology  3.5
     HAD 432  Pharmacology  1.5
     HAD 460  Clinical Laboratory Quality Management  1
     HAD 492  Research Tutorial   2
     HAD 493  Advanced Seminar in Clinical Laboratory Sciences   2
     HAD 494  Clinical Chemistry Practicum**  4
     HAD 496  Histocompatibility Practicum (elective)*  1
     HAD 497  Immunohematology Practicum**    3
     HAD 498  Clinical Coagulation/Urinalysis/ Body Fluids Practicum**  1


    ** Clinical practice consists of full-time clinical instruction and practice at the clinical affiliates and other affiliated patient-care facilities.

    Special Academic Requirements

    In addition to the academic policies of the school, specific academic policies of the program specify that all required courses must be successfully passed in order to remain matriculated in the program. In addition, all professional (HAD) courses with a laboratory component must be passed with a grade of C- or better to remain matriculated in the program and to attend clinical practicums. Failure to pass all required courses, or failure to achieve a minimum grade of C- in all professional (HAD) courses with a laboratory component, will require a student to repeat the course. To graduate from the Clinical Laboratory Sciences program, a passing grade of B+ or better is required for all clinical practica (HAD 397, HAD 398, HAD 494, HAD 497, and HAD 498). 

    Elective Specializations

    Forensic Medical Diagnostics
    Course # Title Credits
     HAD 304  Introduction to Forensic Sciences  1
    Laboratory Information Systems
    Course # Title Credits
      HAD 468  Laboratory Information Systems Internship  1
    Clinical Cytogenetics
    Course # Title Credits
    HAD 406  Introduction to Clinical Cytogenetics   1
    HAD 506 Clinical Cytogenetics Internship  1-6

     

  • Disability Studies, Advanced Certificate

    the advanced certificate program in disability studies 

    Program Director: Pamela Block

    The certificate program in Disability Studies focuses on multiple social and environmental factors that influence the experience of chronic conditions and functional impairments. These factors range from architectural barriers to social discrimination and have a profound influence on access to education, employment, recreation, and participation in other community activities across the life cycle.

    Disability Studies draws from philosophy, history, anthropology, sociology, law, political sciences, economics, English, literary and cultural studies, Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies, critical race studies, bioethics, and many other fields. The goal of this certificate program is to train scholars from clinical and non-clinical backgrounds to use a variety of methodologies to operationalize critical theories and focus on the practical and policy implications of disability. The intent is to address social inequalities improving quality of life and community access for disabled people.

    Admission Requirements

    Admission to the Advanced Certificate Program in Disability Studies is open to any full-time student enrolled in a Stony Brook graduate degree-granting program, and in certain cases independent scholars and writers, as well as clinicians and other professionals in the health fields.

    A Disability Studies Program application form is required. Applicants must show writing and critical analytical abilities sufficient to pursue this course of study. The applications will be reviewed by the program director and admissions committee.

    Program Requirements

    Students must take the following two courses:

    Course # Title Credits
    HAX 664  Conceptual Foundations of Disability Studies 1890s-1990s
    HAX 668 Emerging Topics in Disability Studies 

    One of the following three courses (3 credits) is required: 

    Course # Title Credits
    HAX 665  Disability, Participation and Justice
    HAX 667  Disability Studies Language, Narrative and Rhetoric
    HAX 669  Disability and Health in Local and Global Contexts

    Two additional elective courses (6 credits) are required. 

  • EMT-Basic Program, Certificate

    PROGRAM IN EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN–BASIC LEADING TO A CERTIFICATE

    Program Director: Malcolm Devine

    The EMT-Basic training program is a non-degree, non-credit program designed to train students in accordance with the 1998 standards established by the United States Department of Transportation. Upon successful completion of the program, all students will be eligible to take examinations for certification as:

    • New York State EMT

    • Nationally Registered EMT

    • AHA CPR for Health Care Providers

    Certification in Advanced Cardiac/Pediatric Life Support and Basic Life Support is also part of the curriculum. The program, offered every year, consists of approximately 750 hours of didactic training and 696 hours of clinical practicum in the emergency department, paramedic ambulance, CCU, obstetrics, pediatrics and other applicable venues.

    The program, available at multiple times throughout the academic year, includes approximately 130 hours of didactic instruction and 24 hours of clinical practicum in ambulance operations or emergency hospital care. EMT Basic Certification is a prerequisite for the program in Emergency Medical Technician- Paramedic.

    Admission Requirements

    Applicants must be 18 years of age or older, prior to the New York State practical exam. 

    For further information please click here

     

  • EMT-Paramedic Training, Certificate

    Program in Emergency Medical Technician–Paramedic Training Leading to a Certificate

    Program Director: Paul Werfel 

    The EMT-paramedic training program is a non-degree, non-credit program designed to train effective and compassionate paramedics in accordance with the 1998 standards established by the United States Department of Transportation. Upon successful completion of the program all students will be eligible to take examinations for certification as:

    • New York State EMT–Paramedic

    • Nationally Registered EMT–Paramedic (NREMTP)

    • New York City REMSCO

    • AHA CPR for Health Care Providers

    • AHA ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support)

    • AHA PALS (Pediatric Advanced Life Support)

    Certification in Advanced Cardiac/Pediatric Life Support and Basic Life Support is also part of the curriculum. The program, offered every year, consists of approximately 750 hours of didactic training and 696 hours of clinical practicum in the emergency department, paramedic ambulance, CCU, obstetrics, pediatrics and other applicable venues.

    Admission Requirements

    Applicants must be 18 years of age or older, have a high school diploma and be a currently certified New York State EMT or AEMT.

  • Health Administration, MHA

    Graduate program in health administration leading to a master of health administration degree

    Program Chair: Julie Agris 

    The Graduate Program in Health Administration is a 50-credit hybrid program leading to a Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.) degree that develops highly qualified health management professionals.  The program couples a strong foundation in general management principles with specialized knowledge in the healthcare field.  Students have the opportunity to achieve their degree through a combination of high quality, interactive distance education, intense face-to-face on campus residencies and experiential learning opportunities.  In addition, all students receive one-on-one career advisement as part of a mentorship program in which seasoned healthcare managers and executives work directly with students to assist them in beginning a path to reach their ultimate goals in the health management field.

    Admissions Requirements

    •   Baccalaureate degree with a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.00.

    Program Requirements:

    All students must complete the following curriculum: 

    Professional Courses (Year One)
    Course # Title Credits
     HHH 500 The Health System*  1
     HHH 501  Health Analytic Methods* 
     HHH 510  Health Finance and Accounting* 
     HHH 520  Health Governance and Organizational Analysis*
     HHH 536  Health Law and Compliance* 
     HHH 540  Health Management*
     HHH 585   MHA Residency I: Communication Skills and Interpersonal Effectiveness **
     HHH 586   MHA Residency II: Professionalism and Ethics**

    Professional Courses (Year two) 
    Course # Title Credits
    HHH 506  Health Quality and Performance Improvement*
    HHH 508  Human Resources Management in the Health Sector*
    HHH 541  Health Strategic Planning and Management (Capstone preparation)*
    HHH 542  Health Leadership and Change: Comprehensive Capstone Project*
    HHH 564  Health Technology and Information Management*
    HHH 587  MHA Residency III: Leadership and Change**
    HHH 588  MHA Residency IV: Comprehensive Capstone Project Presentation and Portfolio Development**
    HHH 589  Health Management Practicum and Seminar I**
    HHH 590  Health Management Practicum and Seminar II**
    Elective Courses 
    Candidates must select two courses for a total of at least four elective credits. 
    Course # Title Credits
    HHH 512  Health Finance II* 2
    HHH 530  Health Operations Management*
    HHH 575  Long-Term Care in the Health Sector* 
    HHH 590  Physician Practice Management* 

    Note: Practicum Placement linked to Elective (Inpatient, Outpatient, LTC, PP)


    * On-line Course

    **On-Site Course

     

     

  • Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Ph.D.

    health and rehabilitation sciences leading to the ph.d. degree 

    The Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Program is no longer accepting applications for admission. 

    Program Chair: Sue Ann Sisto

    Rehabilitation Research and Movement Performance (RRAMP) Laboratory at the Research and Development Park is a one-of-a-kind 7,000-square-foot laboratory dedicated to helping individuals with disabilities, assessing athletic performance and aiding recovery after disease or injury thought the use of a state-of-the art motion analysis system. This system is coupled with four in-ground force plates, electromyography and an eye tracking system. There is a large computer lab for graduate students, is the site for student work for in the PhD. Program in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences program. The laboratory houses talented faculty from the School of Health Technology and Management whose research explores ways to improve the lives of individuals with spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke, Huntington’s disease and Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, amputations, orthopedic disorders, cerebral palsy, pediatric cancer, geriatric disorders, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. The RRAMP lab also includes a locomotor training center, a motor control / motor learning lab to probe motor recovery, a musculoskeletal lab currently using ultrasound diagnostic equipment to assess and train muscle control of the spine and pelvic floor, prosthetic and orthotic lab, and a trans cranial magnetic stimulation and a body composition lab to explore physical changes of muscle, fat, and bone. Plans are being made to add a community fitness and wellness center for people with disabilities; this building will be housed adjacent to the RRAMP lab. The RRAMP lab is operated by faculty and staff from the School of Health Technology and Management. Located at the facility are the research director, assistant to the director, and research professors.

    The PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences program is housed in the RRAMP Lab (Rehabilitation Research and Movement Performance) Lab. The RRAMP lab office suite is located in the Research and Support Services Building. In addition to office space, there are four research laboratories within the secured portion of the suite. Within the building, but outside the suite proper, are a conference room, staff/student lounge, disabled patient restroom and shower, and laundry facility.

    Admissions Requirements

    The Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Program is no longer accepting applications for admission. 

    The point of entry into the Ph.D. program is based on a “Mentor Match” of students with faculty from the SHTM. This match ensures a highly individualized program of study for the student based on existing research projects of the faculty. The Mentor will ensure that every student is exposed to related research from the three other branches of research in order to provide a successful translational research experience. Mentors and their collaborators, who are conducting research in other branches of this translational continuum, will expand the research experience of the students. At the same time, these translational research opportunities may facilitate the discovery of relationships between the student’s research and that of other faculty researchers. The Admissions Committee of the program assigns the “Mentor Match” based on requests from the students as well as evaluations of their interests and strengths in relationship to the available faculty.

    In addition to the minimum Graduate School requirements, the following are required:

    A. All applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree prior to the application deadline.

    B. Preference given to applicants with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale and applicants with a master’s degree.

    C. Have taken the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or equivalent graduate entrance exam within the past five years or have completed an American accredited graduate program prior to applying.

    D. Strong letters of recommendation (three references).

    E. Achieved an acceptable score on the TOEFL for international applicants.

    F. Applicant must submit official transcripts from all post-secondary schools.

    G. One essay, no more than 1000 words on the candidate’s research interests and how those interests match to research at Stony Brook University’s School of Health Technology and Management.

    The Admissions Committee will consider all factors including grades, standardized test scores, recommendation letters, essays, prior training, professional experience, and match in research interest. The goal of the committee is to select applicants who have the academic capability, personal qualities, and commitment to provide future value to society through a career in interdisciplinary health sciences research.

    Program Requirements

    The curriculum consists of 78 credits requiring a minimum of four years of full-time effort. Although the direction of the students’ research will be highly individualized, all students must complete 21 credits of core courses, 27 credits of concentration courses (of which 12 are required), and 30 credits of dissertation research. In addition, there will be a zero credit doctoral seminar every semester for discussion and advancement of doctoral projects by faculty and peers.

    Core Course Requirements: 

    Course # Title Credits
    HAX 600  Doctoral Seminar 0
    HAX 602 Frameworks, Models and Classification Systems in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences 3
    HAX 605 Research Ethics 3
    HAX 632 Teaching and Learning
    HAX 653 Research Methods: Design and Statistics 3
    HAX 656 Qualitative Research 3
    SOC 501 Multivariate Stats for Social Science 3
    SOC 502 Multivariate Regression Techniques 3


    Concentration-Specific Requirements:

    Behavioral and Community Health Concentration 

    The BCH concentration is uniquely crafted to train students in leadership and community-based participation, in the domains of healthcare and health policy. This program is designed to meet the aspirations of students seeking to create change in the intersection of healthcare, policy, and the social experience. Fundamentally participatory in nature, this concentration expects students not only to become proficient in research and theory, but also to acquire the tools and experience to apply theory to practice. This program establishes the necessary intellectual framework to understand community-based leadership, and then provides the opportunities to exercise it, professionally and personally. The BCH concentration is designed for social scientists, behavioral scientists, community health researchers, clinicians, community organizers, and health policy specialists. This concentration develops proficiency in various research methods, both qualitative and quantitative in nature. Particular emphasis will be given to translating theory to practice and understanding the applied nature of policy measures. The BCH concentration provides students with proficiency in policy evaluation, community intervention, leadership development, community engagement, and community-based participatory research. Students in the BCH concentration will understand the intersection of health, policy, and society, and the shared relationship among them. In the shifting healthcare environment, attention will be given to marginalized groups, like immigrants, those of racial minority, those with disability, those of lower socioeconomic status, and others. It is expected that graduates of the BCH concentration will be trained to be experts in community leadership, policy analysis, grass roots mobilization, and community health.

    Course # Title Credits
    HAX 640 Community Health and Community Based Participatory Research 3
    HAX 641 Community Mental Health 3
    HAX 642 Participation and Health in Pediatric and Educational Settings 3
    HAX 647 Policies and Ethics in Behavioral and Community Health 3


    Disability Studies Concentration 

    The DS concentration focuses on multiple social and environmental factors that influence the experience of chronic conditions and functional impairments. These factors range from architectural barriers to social discrimination and have a profound influence on access to education, employment, recreation, and participation in other community activities across the life cycle. Disability Studies draws from philosophy, history, anthropology, sociology, law, political sciences, economics, occupational sciences, bioethics, and many other fields. The goal of this concentration is to train researchers from clinical and non-clinical backgrounds to use quantitative, qualitative and community participatory methodologies to operationalize critical theories and focus on the practical and policy implications of disability with the intent of improving quality of life and community access to health services for the disabled. In addition to a critical consideration of ICF conceptualizations of health, activity, and participation, the DS concentration: (1) examines the role of power, social identity, and status as related to disability (2) considers the role of social and regional inequalities, and (3) assesses desired changes at the organizational, community, national, and international levels that might positively affect the disabled.

    Course # Title Credits
    HAX 664  Conceptual Foundations of Disability Studies 1890s-1990s 3
    HAX 665 Disability,Participation and Justice 3
    HAX 667 Disability Studies Language, Narrative and Rhetoric 3
    HAX 668 Emerging Topics in Disability Studies 3


    Rehabilitation and Movement Science Concentration

    The RMS concentration aims to train rehabilitation research clinicians and scientists who focus on the understanding of movement control through multiple types of measurement. This concentration examines body function/structure and activity in the able-bodied and in people with movement impairments to potentially enhance physical and psychosocial functioning. Additionally, research focuses on increasing participation among the functionally impaired, thereby impacting the quality of life of people with disabilities. This pursuit of scientific inquiry for RMS crosses all levels of the ICF model. Special emphasis is placed on the measurement of movement, including kinematics (position), kinetics (forces and moments) and EMG (muscle activity); muscle physiology and function (muscle physiological cross-sectional area), and energetics (metabolic and mechanical). These body and structure measurements are studied around the neuro-musculoskeletal basis of movement, given central nervous system mechanisms and the neurophysiology and neuroscience mechanisms underlying movement disorders. The RMS concentration is supported by theories of motor control, motor learning, and biomechanics. Areas of study may include balance and vestibular-ocular disorders; athletic performance; diabetes and wound healing physiology; body composition and obesity; physical interventions for cancer, and movement deficits in other disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, stroke and spinal cord injury. The RMS concentration uses quantitative methods in the measurement of body structure and function such as what is available in the Rehabilitation Research and Movement Performance Lab. In addition, students may experience studies in the Locomotion Learning Lab and the Shah Spinal Cord Injury Basic Science Lab. Students will also be required to relate these measurements to functional activities and societal participation and learn how these discoveries can improve clinical practice, and inform health policy.

    Course # Title Credits
    HAX 620 Rehabilitation and Disability 3
    HAX 631 Electro/Neurophysiology: Topics for Rehabilitation Research 3
    HAX 634 Motor Learning and Motor Control 3
    HAX 635 Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System and Movement I 3


    Other Requirements

    All students are to be enrolled as full time students (12 credits/semester for year 1 and 9 credits/semester for subsequent years). 
    All courses taken outside the department for application towards the Ph.D. degree requirements are subject to approval of the student's advisor and the graduate program director. The advisor may pose additional course requirements.

    A maximum of 6 graduate credits from other programs, including those of other institutions, may be transferred toward the Ph.D. degree. Credits used to obtain any prior degrees are not eligible for transfer. Requests of credits must be approved by the graduate program director. Each student is required to complete a teaching practicum before graduation. Planning for this requirement is to be made with the student's primary advisor/mentor. Students who are currently educators or have experience teaching in their field of study, may have the teaching practicum waived, which must be approved by the graduate program director.

    Written Qualifying Examination 
    The written qualifying exams are offered every year after completion of the first 2 academic years, usually in the summer before the 3rd year. The written qualifying exam consists of 2 parts: Part 1 covers the required core courses and Part II consists of the required concentration course for each students' concentration. Upon passing the qualifying exams, the Ph.D. student advances to candidacy.

    Dissertation 
    Students chose their dissertation topics in consultation with his/her advisors as soon as possible. Dissertation research is a training experience for the candidate who, under the supervision of the primary advisor/mentor, carries out independent original work of significance. The student, in collaboration with his/her advisor must select a dissertation examining committee as soon as possible after the qualifying exams. The committee must include a Chair who must be within the department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, and a minimum of 3 other members of whom one is typically the primary advisor/mentor, and the remaining members are from within and outside Stony Brook University. The committee must be approved by the graduate program director upon the recommendation of the primary advisor. The dissertation examining committee provides a means of exposing the candidate to ideas, methodologies, and helps guide the research process. Each year the committee meets to review the progress of the student.

    Dissertation Proposal 
    The student is required to submit a written dissertation proposal and present it at an oral examination conducted by the dissertation examining committee. The written dissertation proposal must be distributed to the committee members at least 2 weeks before the oral examination. This examination probes the student's ability and examines progress and direction, methodology and feasibility, which can be based on pilot data. The student will be examined based on knowledge and background on the topic, the aims/hypotheses or research questions, the methodology and any preliminary data.

    Dissertation Defense 
    At the completion of the dissertation, approval of the dissertation involves a formal oral defense which is open to all interested members of the University community. The candidate must fill out a doctoral dissertation defense form (available on the graduate school webpage) and must include the dissertation abstract and all relevant information. The form should be submitted to the graduate program director at least 4 weeks before the defense. This form is then submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School who is responsible for advertising the event to the University community. Copies of the dissertation are distributed at least 2 weeks before the defense date. One copy is kept in the department for examination by the faculty. The final approval of the dissertation must be a majority vote by the dissertation examining committee.

  • Health Care Policy and Management, MS

    Program in Health Care Policy and Management Leading to the Master of Science Degree

    The Master’s Program in Health Care Policy and Management is no longer accepting applications for admission.

    This program is open to qualified health professionals who wish to pursue careers in health care management, health policy, and nutrition within their own professional fields.

    Program Requirements

    Candidates must complete a minimum of 36 credits and satisfy the specific core, concentration, and practicum requirements described below. Courses are chosen with program advisement and approval.

    Core: Candidates must successfully complete courses to demonstrate understanding and competence in the areas of medical care delivery, research methodology, statistics, and communication (12 credits).

    Concentration: Candidates must select a specialty concentration in health care management, health policy, or nutrition and complete courses in the chosen area (15 credits).

    Practicum: Candidates must complete a practicum in their specialty concentrations (3-6 credits).

    Thesis: A master’s thesis is optional (4-6 credits) and is in lieu of the practicum requirement.

    Electives: Candidates must successfully complete 3-6 elective credits. Practicum credits do not apply.

  • Health Care Management, Advanced Certificate

    The Advanced Certificate Program in Health Care Management

    Program Director: Brooke Ellison

    The Advanced Certificate Program in Health Care Management is a professional development program intended for health practitioners who require management training and for managers who require specific management training in the health care field.

    Program Requirements

    The program is jointly sponsored by the School of Health Technology and Management and the College of Business. The curriculum consists of 18 credits. Students must complete four required courses:

    Course # Title Credits
    HAS 530 Health Care Operations 3
    HAS 534 Fundamentals of Health Care Management 3
    HAS 538 Health Economics and Public Policy 3
    HAS 545 Ethics and Health Care 3

    Six remaining credits can be chosen from HAS courses, or from specified MBA and HAP courses, upon approval.

  • Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety, MS

     Program in Healthcare quality and patient safety leading to the master of science degree 

    The Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety Program is no longer accepting applications for admission.

    Interim Program Director: Deborah Zelizer 

    The School of Health Technology and Management offers a Master of Science degree in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety.  Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety is a part-time, 36 credit degree program. The program is designed specifically for clinical and non-clinical interdisciplinary health professionals who wish to develop the knowledge, skills, and competencies required to assume leadership roles in healthcare quality, healthcare risk management, patient safety and related fields. Graduates will be eligible to sit for the Certified Patient Safety Officer (CPSO) examination leading to  certification.  

    Admissions Requirements 

    Preference for admission will be given to candidates with an overall 3.0 grade point average and baccalaureate degree from an entry level clinical program, or a non-clinical degree and two years of full-time healthcare experience. 

    Program Requirements

    Candidates must complete a minimum of 36 credits. The curriculum requires a capstone project or thesis.  

    Core Curriculum 

    Course # Title Credits
    HAU    500  Financing Healthcare Organizations
    HAU    501     Patient Safety and the Management of Risk
    HAU    502     Patient Safety and Health Law
    HAU    503     Error Science, Human Factors and Patient Safety
    HAU    504     Crew Resource Management, Team Performance, and Communication
    HAU    505     Quality Improvement and Safety
    HAU    506     Accreditation, Regulations, and National Patient Safety Goals
    HAU    507     Planning, Evaluation, and Assessment of Patient Safety Initiatives
    HAU    508     Statistics for Patient Safety Professionals
    HAU    509     Research Design and Methodology for the Patient Safety Professional
    HAU    510     Advanced Practice for Risk and Safety Officers
    HAU     584      Capstone Project
    HAU     594      Capstone Research-Based

     

     

  • Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety, Advanced Certificate

    THE ADVANCED CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN Healthcare Quality and Patient safety 

     The Advanced Certificate in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety Program is no longer accepting applications for admission.

    Interim Program Director: Deborah Zelizer  

    The advanced graduate certificate is designed for healthcare providers who have met the experiential requirements to sit for quality, risk management and safety national certification examinations with on-the-job experience, but do not possess the academic preparation in quality and safety. The curriculum consists of 18 credits. 

    Admissions Requirements 

    Preference for admission will be given to candidates with an overall 2.8 grade point average and baccalaureate degree from an entry level clinical program, or a non-clinical degree and two years of full-time healthcare experience. 

    Program Requirements 

    Course # Title Credits
    HAU 501   Patient Safety and the Management of Risk
    HAU 502   Patient Safety and Health Law
    HAU 503   Error Science, Human Factors and Patient Safety
    HAU 504   Crew Resource Management, Team Performance and Communication
    HAU 505   Quality Improvement and Safety
    HAU 506   Accreditation, Regulations and National Patient Safety  

     

     
  • Health Science, BS

    Program in Health Science Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

    Program Chair: Deborah Zelizer 

    The School of Health Technology and Management offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Science (BSHS), with  clinical and non-clinical concentrations. Non-clinical concentrations of study include community health education, disability studies and human development, emergency and critical care, environmental health and safety, health care informatics, health care management, and public health. Clinical concentrations of study include anesthesia technology, healthcare quality: coding and reimbursement, medical dosimetry, nuclear medicine technology, radiation therapy, and radiologic technology. The curriculum requires that students receive a broad liberal arts education during their first three years. In the senior year, the curriculum focuses on health care-related topics. Graduates will be educated and knowledgeable about health care, and may expect to be employed by hospitals; integrated health care delivery systems; physician group practices; health departments; nursing homes; and managed care, corporate and not-for-profit organizations. They can also pursue clinical degrees through appropriate admissions processes.

    While there is no formal application process, all students must complete the following requirements before advancing to the senior year curriculum. 

    * 91 credits with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 including the following: 

    • All S.B.C. requirements
    • A minimum of 16 credits of natural science coursework, including HAN 200 and HAN 202 (or equivalent anatomy and physiology courses) 
    • 21 credits of related electives including HAN 251 and HAN 312. Any natural science course taken beyond the minimum requirement of 16 credits can also satisfy the related electives requirement.
    • 10 upper-division credits (300 and 400 level courses). Can be met with any course meeting S.B.C., natural science, or related electives requirements. 

    Related Electives

    Students are encouraged to take related electives designated:

    • ECO, CSE and BUS for the Health Care Management concentration

    • CSE, PSY, ECO and BUS for the Health Care Informatics concentration

    • HIS, HBP, ECO, MEC, BCP, SOC and BUS for the Environmental Health concentration

    • LHW, ECO, ANT, SOC, HMC, PSY and BUS for the Public Health concentration

    • SOC, HWC, LHW, PSY, SSI and HMC for the Community Health Education concentration

    Contact the Health Science program for advising and an extensive list of related electives or see the course descriptions listing in the University Undergraduate Bulletin for complete information.

    * All students need a minimum of 91 credits and all requirements met by the end of the spring semester of their junior year to advance to the fall senior year curriculum. Prerequisite courses (natural science and related electives) required for advancement to the senior year curriculum must be completed with a letter grade of C or better. A Pass/No Credit grade is not accepted.

    Program Requirements

    Required Core Courses: Fall Semester (Senior Year)

    For the first semester of the last year of study (senior year), all students enroll in 15 credits of core health science courses including:

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 300 Health Care Issues 3
    HAN 333 Communication Skills 3
    HAN 335 Professional Ethics 3
    HAN 364 Issues in Health Care Informatics 3
    HAN 383 Scholarly Writing in Health Science 3

    Special Academic Requirements

    To be in good standing in the Health Science program, a student must maintain a 2.0 overall cumulative grade point average, with a 2.5 minimum professional grade point average in the required HAN (Health Science major) courses. All core Health Science program courses must be passed with a grade of C or better before a student is permitted to advance to the concentration courses. If a student receives a grade less than C in any of the HAN courses, the course must be repeated.

    Concentration Courses: Spring Semester (Senior Year)

    During the last semester of the senior year, students must take one of the following concentrations of study. *Approval for a generalist concentration of study may be granted if, upon judgment of the program director, there are exceptional circumstances. 

    Anesthesia Technology

    This concentration provides the knowledge and skills required for students to function as integral members of anesthesia teams in surgical settings. After completion of this concentration, students can work as an assistant in the operating room and continue to the post-baccalaureate anesthesiology technologist program to be eligible for the national certification examination. (Total length of program is 4+1=5 years.)

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 434 Corporate Compliance and Regulation 4
    HAN 481 Introduction to Anesthesia 2
    HAN 483 Cardiopulmonary Physiology for Anesthesia Technology 3
    HAN 485 Clinical Monitoring 1
    HAN 489 Pharmacology for Anesthesia Technology  4

    For admission requirements to the clinical concentrations, please refer to the SHTM website at http://healthtechnology.stonybrookmedicine.edu/programs/hs 

    Community Health Education

    This concentration provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to plan, implement, and evaluate health education programs in the community. Students who successfully complete this concentration may be eligible to apply for the national certification examination for health educators. Employment opportunities may be found in public and private health-related agencies, hospitals, and HMOs (Health Maintenance Organizations).

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 440 Introduction to Community Health Education 3
    HAN 442 Community Health Education Models and Resources 3
    HAN 444 Teaching Strategies 4
    HAN 456 Behavioral and Social Aspects of Health 3

    Disability Studies and Human Development 

    This concentration provides students with an interdisciplinary focus of study in areas such as independent living, employment, adults and children with disabilities, and health and community issues. Prepares students for entry-level professional and managerial positions in developmental or physical disability services agencies, independent living centers, mental health centers, and geriatric and vocational rehabilitation agencies.

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 443 Aging and Disability 3
    HAN 446 Disability Health and Community 3
    HAN 447 Children with Disabilities 3
    HAN 448 Disability and Employment 3
    HAN 449 Project in Disability Studies 4
    Emergency and Critical Care

    This concentration will serve the needs of those students interested in pursuing clinical graduate studies. Emphasis is placed on providing knowledge of the most frequently encountered medical emergencies, including trauma and resuscitation. In addition, due to the changing global environment, courses on hazardous materials and weapons of mass destruction will also be provided.

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 416 Special Issues in Emergency Care and Resuscitation 3
    HAN 417 Cardiac Emergencies 3
    HAN 471 Trauma and Trauma Systems 3
    HAN 472 Emergency Response to Hazardous Materials and Terrorism 3
    HAN 477 Medical Emergencies  3
    Environmental Health and Safety 

    This concentration explores the concepts and principles of various environmental health issues including lead management, pest management, hazardous waste management, and food service sanitation. Emphasis is placed on the recognition, identification and control of environmental contaminants in the workplace; prevention and preparedness for hazardous material incidents; and compliance with various regulatory agencies.

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 470  Occupational Health and Safety Engineering 3
    HAN 474 Industrial Hygiene 4
    HAN 475  Fundamentals of Environmental Health
    HAN 476 Hazardous Materials, Emergency Response and Environmental Auditing 4
    HAN 478 Internship in Environmental Health 2

    Health Care Informatics

    This concentration prepares students for a career in health care information systems, and processing and managing health care data with computer and communication technologies. Emphasis is placed on health care information systems’ architecture, computerized medical data processing, and clinical decision support systems. Ten credits of computer science/information systems electives are strongly recommended as prerequisites (CSE 101, CSE 113 and CSE 114).

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 462 Developing Health Information Systems 4
    HAN 464 Health Information Systems Management 4
    HAN 465  Concepts and Case Studies in Health Informatics 
    HAN 466 Applied Health Care Informatics 3
    HAN 467 Utilization and Outcomes Research Methods 3

    Health Care Management

    This concentration provides students with the knowledge and skills required to manage health care practices, plan health care programs and utilize the fundamentals of health care management and health services administration.

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 432 Introduction to Health Care Management 4
    HAN 434 Corporate Compliance and Regulation 4
    HAN 435 Sales and Marketing in Health Care 3
    HAN 436 Continuous Quality Improvement in Health Care 3
    Healthcare Quality: Coding and Reimbursement 

    This concentration of study (AHIMA accreditation pending) is designed to develop the requisite knowledge, skills, and competencies required for entry level practice as a medical coder. Prepares students to take the nationally recognized Certified Coding Associate (CCA) credential, which distinguishes coders as possessing coding competencies across all settings, including hospitals (in-patient and ambulatory) and physician practices. 

    Note: Enrollment in HAN 424 Pathophysiology (3 credits) is required during the fall semester of the senior year as a prerequisite for this concentration. Acceptance into the concentration is required in order to register for the spring semester concentration coursework. In addition, a 3 credit, full-time 6 week 45 hour practicum during summer session I is required. Curriculum subject to change, please check with the department. 

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 409   Basic CPT Coding
    HAN 410   ICD-10-CM for Coders
    HAN 420   ICD-10-PCS for Coders
    HAN 421 Advanced CPT Coding
    HAN 422 Healthcare Reimbursement  
    HAN 423 Coding Practicum

    For admission requirements to the clinical concentrations, please refer to the SHTM website at http://healthtechnology.stonybrookmedicine.edu/programs/hs


    Medical Dosimetry

    A medical dosimetrist is a member of the radiation oncology team. Medical dosimetrists have the education and expertise necessary to generate radiation dose distributions and dose calculations for cancer patients in collaboration with the medical physicist and the radiation oncologist. After completion of this concentration, students continue on to the post-baccalaureate program in order to be eligible to take the Medical Dosimetrist Certification exam.  Job opportunities may be found in cancer treatment centers, community hospitals, free-standing clinics and medical schools. (Total length of program is 4 + 1 = 5 years.)

    Note: Enrollment in HAN 395 Radiation Physics in Medicine (4 credits) is required during the fall semester of the senior year to submit an application for this concentration of study.  Acceptance into the post-baccalaureate clinical year is required in order to enter the concentration. The Medical Dosimetry program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, 20 North Wacker Drive, Suite 2850 Chicago, Illinois 60606-3182, Phone: 312.704.5300, Email: mail@jrcert.org 

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 402  Radiographic Anatomy and Pathology 
    HAN 482 Introduction to Pathology 3
    HAN 487  Introduction to Treatment Planning
    HAN 490  Fundamentals of Medical Dosimetry and Contouring
    HAN 492  Radiation Oncology/Medical Physics II

    For admission requirements to the clinical concentrations, please refer to the SHTM website at http://healthtechnology.stonybrookmedicine.edu/programs/hs

    Nuclear Medicine

    This concentration is designed to educate students to meet a growing need for highly trained technologists who utilize rapidly developing technologies to image the distribution of radioactive agents in the human body. Nuclear medicine imaging is used for patients with cardiac conditions and cancer. After completion of this concentration, students continue on to the post-baccalaureate program in order to be eligible to take the national registry examination. Job opportunities may be found in hospitals, physician offices, and diagnostic laboratories. (Total length of program is 4+1=5 years.)

    Note: HAN 395 Radiation Physics in Medicine (4 credits) is required during the fall semester of the senior year as a prerequisite to acceptance into the concentration. Acceptance into the post-baccalaureate clinical year is required in order to enter the concentration. 

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 401 Radiobiology and Health Physics 3
    HAN 402 Radiographic Anatomy and Pathology 3
    HAN 426 Instrumentation for Nuclear Medicine Technology  3
    HAN 427 Nuclear Medicine Procedures 6
    HAN 429 Radiopharmacy and Therapy in Nuclear Medicine 3

    For admission requirements to the clinical concentrations, please refer to the SHTM website at http://healthtechnology.stonybrookmedicine.edu/programs/hs 

    Public Health

    This concentration provides students with a basic foundation, including epidemiology and biostatistics, in public health. Students who graduate with this concentration may find employment in health departments, public health agencies, health maintenance organizations, and health-related corporations.

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 450 Introduction to Public Health 4
    HAN 452 Epidemiology and Biostatistics 3
    HAN 454 Issues in Public Health 3
    HAN 455  Health Literacy for Public Health 
    HAN 456 Behavioral and Social Aspects of Health 3
    Radiation Therapy 

    This concentration is designed to educate students to meet the growing demand for radiation therapists. Radiation therapists administer radiation and deliver patient care for the duration of the patients’ treatment and are part of the radiation oncology team. Radiation is an effective tool to treat cancer and provide palliative care. After completion of this concentration, students continue on to the non-credit post-baccalaureate program in order to be eligible to take the national registry examination. The 12 month post-baccalaureate clinical rotations are conducted at the Mt. Sinai Health System. (Total length of program is 4+1=5 years.)

    Note: HAN 395 Radiation Physics in Medicine (4 credits) is required during the fall semester of the senior year as a prerequisite to acceptance into the concentration. Acceptance into the post-baccalaureate clinical year is required in order to enter the concentration.

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 401 Radiobiology and Health Physics 
    HAN 402 Radiographic Anatomy and Pathology
    HAN 482 Introduction to Pathology
    HAN 486 Principles and Practice of Radiation Therapy 
    HAN 492 Radiation Oncology/Medical Physics II 


    For admission requirements to the clinical concentrations, please refer to the SHTM website at http://healthtechnology.stonybrook.medicine.edu/programs/hs

    Radiologic Technology

    This concentration is developed to educate students to meet the growing demand for technologists who image the body through the use of radiation equipment (x-ray technology). As a member of the radiological team, technologists capture images of bones, organs, and blood vessels as prescribed by physicians to assist in the diagnosis of diseases or injuries. After completion of this concentration, students continue on to the post-baccalaureate program in order to be eligible to take the national registry examination. Job opportunities may be found in hospitals, physician offices, urgent care clinics, diagnostic laboratories, and industry. (Total length of program is 4+1=5 years.)

    Note: HAN 395 Radiation Physics in Medicine (4 credits) is required during the fall semester of the senior year as a prerequisite to acceptance into the concentration. Acceptance into the post-baccalaureate clinical year is required in order to enter the concentration. 

    Course # Title Credits
    HAN 401 Radiobiology and Health Physics 3
    HAN 402 Radiographic Anatomy and Pathology 3
    HAN 404 Radiology Instrumentation 3
    HAN 405 Radiographic Technique 3
    HAN 406 Radiographic Procedures and Positioning I 6

    For admission requirements to the clinical concentrations, please refer to the SHTM website at http://healthtechnology.stonybrookmedicine.edu/programs/hs 

  • Medical Molecular Biology, MS

    Program in medical molecular biology leading to the Master of science degree

    Program Director: Gloria Viboud 

    The program is designed to provide clinical laboratory scientists with a strong foundation in the different molecular aspects of medical biology and the laboratory skills necessary to perform molecular-based techniques used in diagnostics, the research lab, and the medical biotechnology industry.  Learning outcomes will be consistent with those specified by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS) for Diagnostic Molecular Scientists. This includes proficiency in a broad array of techniques used in molecular diagnostics, basic principles behind each test, applications to the diagnosis of genetic diseases, cancer and infectious diseases, interpretation of results, advantages and limitations of each method, and type of specimen required for each test. The program also emphasizes the importance of biosafety and proper decontamination procedures, and quality control to ensure accurate data for proper patient diagnosis.

    Students will complete more than 50% of the course requirements in the distance-learning format. The program is offered as a two-year prescribed part-time program during the summer, fall and spring terms. The last term includes three clinical rotations in the areas of molecular diagnostics, cytogenetics and flow cytometry, and the program culminates with a capstone project. After completion of the program, students will be eligible to take the Technologist in Molecular Biology by the American Society for Clinical Pathology [MB(ASCP)] certification examination.

    Admission Requirements 

    •   A New York State clinical laboratory technologist license
    •   Baccalaureate degree in a life science related field with a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.00.
    •   12 credits of chemistry with labs (including organic chemistry and biochemistry), 8 credits of biology with labs (including cell biology and genetics), 3 credits of microbiology, 3 credits of immunology, 6 credits of mathematics (including statistics), 3 credits of pathophysiology (for those applicants without a clinical laboratory sciences undergraduate major).

    Program Requirements

    Students must complete a total of 33 credits including the following required on-line and on-site courses.

    Professional Courses (Year One)
    Course # Title Credits
    HMM 500   Fundamentals of Molecular Biology Techniques*
    HMM 510   Advanced Molecular Biology Laboratory**       3
    HMM 511 Application of Molecular Biology in Diagnosis 3
    HMM 516 Application of Molecular Biology in Research* 3
    HMM 520   Flow Cytometry Laboratory** 1
    HMM 521   Flow Cytometry Methods and Applications* 2
    HMM 540   Laboratory Operations in Molecular Biology* 2
     Professional Courses (Year Two)
    Course # Title Credits
    HMM 531 Cytogenetics Methods and Applications* 2
    HMM 545   Ethics in the Laboratory* 2
    HMM 551 Research Methods and Scientific Writing* 3
    HMM 570 Journal Club on Molecular Biology* 1
    HMM 581 Clinical Practicum in Molecular Diagnostics** 2
    HMM 583 Clinical Practicum in Flow Cytometry** 2
    HMM 585 Clinical Practicum in Cytogenetics** 2
    HMM 596 Capstone Project in Medical Molecular Biology  2

    * On-line Course

    **On-Site Course

  • Occupational Therapy, BS/MS

    Program in Occupational Therapy Leading to the Bachelor of Science in Health Science/Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Degrees

    Interim Program Chair: Mary Squillace 

    The Department of Occupational Therapy offers an upper-division three-year program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Health Science/Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Degrees.

    This degree program is offered in a traditional weekday format. Students must have all prerequisites completed by the start date of the program. Students who enter and remain in good standing will graduate in June, three years post entry.

    Occupational therapy is the art and science of directing an individual’s participation in selected tasks to restore, reinforce, and enhance performance in activities that are important and meaningful to their health and well-being. Reference to occupation in the title is in the context of an individual’s goal directed use of time, energy, interest, and attention. An occupational therapist’s fundamental concern is the client’s development and maintenance of the capacity to perform, throughout the life span and with satisfaction to self and others, those tasks and roles essential to productive living and to the mastery of self and the environment.

    Occupational therapy provides service to those individuals whose abilities to cope with tasks of living are threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, the aging process, poverty, cultural differences, physical injury or illness, or psychological and social disability.

    Occupational therapy serves a diverse population in a variety of settings, such as hospitals and clinics, rehabilitation facilities, long-term care facilities, extended care facilities, sheltered workshops, schools and camps, private homes, and community agencies.

    The Occupational Therapy Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE): c/o AOTA, 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3425. ACOTE’s phone number is 301-652-6611 (x 2914) . Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist, administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). In addition, most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT certification examination. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.

    In addition to the baccalaureate and master’s degrees, the school’s Certificate of Professional Achievement in Occupational Therapy is awarded upon satisfactory completion of all required course work.

    Admission Requirements

    Candidates for the occupational therapy program must meet the upper-division admission requirements of the School of Health Technology and Management. The requirements may be fulfilled through previously completed college studies.

    In addition to the general academic requirements of the School of Health Technology and Management, the occupational therapy program requires candidates to meet the school’s natural science requirements by successfully completing eight credits of biology and four credits of anatomy, or four credits of biology and eight credits of anatomy and physiology, four credits of chemistry, and four credits of physics, all with laboratories and designated for science majors. Preference is given to those candidates who have completed science courses within the past ten years. A three-credit Introduction to Psychology course, a three-credit Abnormal Psychology course, a three-credit Introduction to Sociology or Anthropology course, and a three-credit statistics course are required. Candidates must complete required course work by the end of the spring term of the year for which application is made. Preference is given to applicants with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. A minimum of 40 hours experience observing occupational therapy treatment in two different settings (outpatient rehabilitation, developmental disabilities, acute care, nursing homes, and schools) under the supervision of an occupational therapist (OTR) is also required for admission to the program. The observation must be supervised and documented in writing by the occupational therapists. No more than 50% of the minimum 40 required experience hours can be completed at a place of employment. Current certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid are required.

    Program Requirements

    Occupational therapy students must complete the following course requirements of the School of Health Technology and Management.

    Basic Science Courses/Other Health Technology and Management Courses
    Course # Title Credits
    HBP 310 Pathology 3
    HBY 350 Physiology 4
    Professional Course (Year One)
    Course # Title Credits
    HAO 310 Neuroscience 4
    HAO 314 Introduction to Historical and Contemporary Practices of Occupational Therapy 3
    HAO 315 Foundations of Occupational Therapy 3
    HAO 319 Kinesiology for Occupational Therapy 4
    HAO 320 Life Span Growth and Development for Occupational Therapy 3
    HAO 323 Mental Health Concepts 3
    HAO 324 Psychosocial Theory and Practice 3
    HAO 330 Occupational Therapy Theory and Practice in Pediatrics 4
    HAO 331 Occupational Therapy Theory and Practice in Adults I 2
    HAO 374 Professional Behaviors I 1.5
    HAO 385 Conditions in Occupational Therapy 2
    HAO 396 Fieldwork IA* 1
    HAO 461 Functional Anatomy for Occupational Therapy 4
    Professional Courses (Year Two)
    Course # Title Credits
    HAO 332 Occupational Therapy Theory and Practice in Adults II   3
    HAO 334 Acute Care 1
    HAO 338 Substance Abuse and Occupational Therapy 2
    HAO 340 Prosthetics and Orthotics 2
    HAO 397 Fieldwork IB* 1
    HAO 398 Fieldwork IC* 1
    HAO 421 Physical Agent Modalities for the Occupational Therapist 1
    HAO 430 Sensory Integration Theory and Practice in Occupational Therapy 2
    HAO 440 Gerontology and Occupational Therapy 3
    HAO 451 Introduction to Research for Occupational Therapy 3
    HAO 485 Vision, Perception, and Cognition 2
    HAO 517 Universal Design 3
    HAO 542 Patient Education 2
    HAO 551 Research Design for Occupational Therapy 3
    HAO 574 Professional Behaviors II 1
    HAO 596 Fieldwork Level IIA** 12
     Professional Courses (Year Three)
    Course # Title Credits
    HAO 530 Community, Occupation, and Health (Effective Summer 2017, 4 credits)
    HAO 532 Emerging Areas of Practice 2
    HAO 534 The Occupational Therapy Manager 3
    HAO 562 Principles of Instruction 3
    HAO 575 Professional Transition Seminar 2
    HAO 580 Special Topics in Occupational Therapy 2
    HAO 585 Disability Studies and Occupational Therapy 2
    HAO 592 Case Studies II 2
    HAO 593 Case Studies III (Effective Spring 2018, course title is Case Studies)  2
    HAO 597 Fieldwork Level IIB** 12
    HAO 598 Fieldwork Level IIC** 10

    *Fieldwork level IA, IB and IC are pre-clinical experiences and generally consist of observation and very limited hands-on experience in mental health, physical disabilities, and pediatric settings. Each is a maximum of 40 hours in length.

    **Fieldwork level IIA, IIB, and IIC are full-time clinical experiences.

  • Occupational Therapy, MS

    Program in Occupational Therapy Leading to the Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Degree

    Interim Program Chair: Mary Squillace 

    The Department of Occupational Therapy offers a three-year program leading to the Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Degree. This degree program is offered in a traditional weekday format.

    Occupational therapy is the art and science of directing an individual’s participation in selected tasks to restore, reinforce, and enhance performance in activities that are important and meaningful to their health and well-being. Reference to occupation in the title is in the context of an individual’s goal directed use of time, energy, interest, and attention. An occupational therapist’s fundamental concern is the client’s development and maintenance of the capacity to perform, throughout the life span and with satisfaction to self and others, those tasks and roles essential to productive living and to the mastery of self and the environment.

    Occupational therapy provides service to those individuals whose abilities to cope with tasks of living are threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, the aging process, poverty, cultural differences, physical injury or illness, or psychological and social disability.

    Occupational therapy serves a diverse population in a variety of settings, such as hospitals and clinics, rehabilitation facilities, long-term care facilities, extended care facilities, sheltered workshops, schools and camps, private homes, and community agencies.

    The Occupational Therapy Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE): c/o AOTA, 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3425. ACOTE’s phone number is 301-652-6611 (x 2914). Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist, administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). In addition, most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT certification examination. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s eligibility to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.

    In addition to the master’s degree, the school’s Certificate of Professional Achievement in Occupational Therapy is awarded upon satisfactory completion of all required coursework.

    Admission Requirements

    The occupational therapy program requires candidates to successfully complete eight credits of biology and four credits of anatomy, or four credits of biology and eight credits of anatomy and physiology, four credits of chemistry, and four credits of physics, all with laboratories and designated for science majors. Candidates need to have completed science courses within the past ten years. A three-credit Introduction to Psychology course, a three-credit Abnormal Psychology course, a three-credit Introduction to Sociology or Anthropology course, and a three-credit statistics course are required. Candidates must complete required course work by the end of the spring term of the year for which application is made. Preference is given to applicants with an overall GPA of 3.5 in all course work and a GPA of 3.0 in both the science prerequisites and the overall natural science GPA. A minimum of 40 hours experience observing occupational therapy treatment in two different settings (outpatient rehabilitation, developmental disabilities, acute care, nursing homes, and schools) under the supervision of an occupational therapist (OTR) is also required for admission to the program. The observation must be supervised and documented in writing by the occupational therapists. No more than 50% of the minimum 40 required experience hours can be completed at a place of employment. A baccalaureate degree is required as well as current certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid.

    Program Requirements

    Occupational therapy students must complete the following course requirements of the School of Health Technology and Management.

    Professional Course (Year One)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAO 500 Functional Neuroscience
     HAO 504 Introduction to the Historical & Contemporary Practices of Occupational Therapy
     HAO 505 Foundations of Occupational Therapy
     HAO 506  Life Span Growth and Development for Occupational Therapy
     HAO 507 Conditions in Occupational Therapy
     HAO 508 Theories of Adult Rehabilitation 
     HAO 509 Occupational Therapy Theory and Practice in Pediatrics
     HAO 519 Kinesiology for Occupational Therapy
     HAO 523 Assessment & Intervention of Psychosocial Issues
     HAO 561 Functional Anatomy Review
     HAO 573 Professional Behaviors I 1.5 
     HAO 586  Fieldwork IA* 1
     Professional Courses (Year Two)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAO 517 Universal Design 3
     HAO 520 Substance Abuse and Occupational Therapy
     HAO 522 Assessment & Intervention of Adult Rehabilitation
     HAO 524 Assessment & Intervention of the Upper Extremities
     HAO 525 Vision, Perception, and Cognition
     HAO 526 Gerontology and Occupational Therapy
     HAO 527 Sensory Integration Theory and Practice in Occupational Therapy
     HAO 542 Patient Education
     HAO 549 Introduction to Research Design for Occupational Therapy
     HAO 551 Research Design for Occupational Therapy
     HAO 574 Professional Behaviors II
     HAO 587 Fieldwork IB* 1
     HAO 588 Fieldwork IC* 1
     HAO 596 Fieldwork Level IIA** 12
     Professional Courses (Year Three)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAO 530 Community, Occupation, and Health 4
     HAO 534 The Occupational Therapy Manager
     HAO 562 Principles of Instruction
     HAO 570 Global Communities, Occupation, and Health
     HAO 575 Professional Transition Seminar
     HAO 580 Special Topics in Occupational Therapy
     HAO 585 Disability Studies and Occupational Therapy
     HAO 593 Case Studies III
     HAO 595 Service Learning & Capstone Project
     HAO 597 Fieldwork Level IIB** 12 

    *Fieldwork level IA, IB and IC are pre-clinical experiences and generally consist of observation and very limited hands-on experience in mental health, physical disabilities, and pediatric settings. Each is a maximum of 40 hours in length.

    **Fieldwork level IIA and IIB are full-time clinical experiences.

  • Phlebotomy Training Program, Certificate

    PHLEBOTOMY TRAINING PROGRAM LEADING TO A CERTIFICATE

    Program Director: Kathleen Finnegan 

    The phlebotomy program is a non-degree, non-credit ASPT (American Society of Phlebotomy Technicians) accredited program designed to train students in effective phlebotomy techniques. Graduates can be employed in a variety of settings including hospitals, private laboratories, and physicians’ offices. The phlebotomy program consists of 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of professional laboratory practice followed by 100 hours of clinical training at a local hospital.

    Admission Requirements

    Applicants must be 18 years of age or older, have a high school diploma (or an equivalent), and a minimum grade point average of 80 (on a scale of 100) or 2.5 (on a scale of 4.0). Upon successful completion of the program, students receive a certificate of achievement and are eligible to take a national certifying examination in phlebotomy.

  • Physical Therapy, DPT

    Program in Physical Therapy Leading to the Entry-Level Doctor of Physical Therapy Degree

    Program Chair: Eric Lamberg

    Recent trends in health care have precipitated the development of a three-year entry-level graduate clinical doctorate program in physical therapy. These changes in health care include:

    • Shorter lengths of stay in traditional environments.
    • Higher acuity and survival as a result of medical science and technological advances.
    • The need for health management via intervention, prevention, and maintenance, as well as the management of disease, impairments, and disabilities.
    • Role and practice adaptations by physical therapists in anticipation of and in response to market changes.
    • The development of strategies by payers that demand evidence-based justifications for interventions.
    • Health care models that require greater risk assumption and accountability for outcomes of care. The three-year graduate program consists of 99 didactic credits and 36 clinical credits. Graduates of the program are prepared to provide care in a multitude of physical therapy settings. The program develops leaders who demonstrate evidence-based practice, critical inquiry skills, and clinical decision making skills needed for differential diagnosis and autonomous practice. In addition to direct patient care, graduates can pursue careers in research, administration, consultation, and community health. The Doctor of Physical Therapy Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association (CAPTE/APTA). Graduates are eligible to sit for the national license exam. In addition to the doctor of physical therapy degree, the school’s Certificate of Professional Achievement in Physical Therapy is awarded upon satisfactory completion of all coursework.

    Admission Requirements

     

    Applicants for the entry-level doctor of physical therapy program must have a completed baccalaureate degree prior to enrollment in the program. Candidates must meet the school’s natural science requirement by successfully completing two courses each of chemistry, physics, and biology. Each course must be designated for science majors and have a laboratory component. One course in anatomy and one course in physiology or two courses of anatomy and physiology are also required. Completion of required science courses must be within the past ten years. No more than two science prerequisites may be outstanding at the time of application; outstanding sciences cannot be in the same subject area. In addition, the department requires one course in psychology  and one course in statistics. Candidates must complete required course work by the end of the spring term of the year for which the application is made. Certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid is required. A minimum of a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and a minimum of a 3.0 cumulative science grade point average is preferred. Applicants must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. At least 100 hours of volunteer or work experience within a physical therapy facility is required. A varied exposure to the field is recommended.

    Program Requirements

    Physical therapy students must complete the following required courses:

    Professional Courses (Year One)
    Course # Title Credits
    HBA 540 Human Anatomy for Physical Therapists 6
    HBA 542 Advanced Human Anatomy 0
    HAY 500 Neuroscience for Physical Therapy I 4
    HAY 517 Exercise Physiology 1
    HAY 518 Foundations of Exercise and Movement in PT 3.5
    HAY 519 Kinesiology 5
    HAY 526 Clinical Medicine and Pharmacology I 3.5
    HAY 527 Principles of Inpatient Care 4
    HAY 528 Clinical Medicine and Pharmacology II 4
    HAY 534 Motor Learning and Motor Control 4
    HAY 543 Wound Care in Physical Therapy 1
    HAY 544 Modalities in Physical Therapy 3
    HAY 552 Research Methods for Physical Therapists: Design and Statistics 5
    HAY 557 Introduction to Evidence Based Practice 1
    HAY 560 Foundations of Professional Practice in Physical Therapy 2
    HAY 561 Teaching, Consulting, Communicating in Clinical Education 2
    HAY 589 Case Studies I 1
    Professional Courses (Year Two)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAY 501  Growth and Development Across the Lifespan 4
     HAY 502  Psychosocial Aspects of Disability I 1
     HAY 503  Psychosocial Aspects of Disability II
     HAY 504  Adult Neurological Assessment I  
     HAY 505  Adult Neurological Assessment II
     HAY 506  Adult Neurological Interventions
     HAY 507  Orthopedic Physical Therapy Ia
     HAY 508  Orthopedic Physical Therapy II 3.5 
     HAY 509  Pediatric Physical Therapy
     HAY 512  Prosthetics and Orthoses
     HAY 513  Orthopedic Physical Therapy Ib 1.5 
     HAY 590  Case Studies II
     HAY 595  Clinical Internship I  6

     

    Professional Courses (Year Three)
    Course # Title Credits
    HAY 510 Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation 4
    HAY 524 Health, Wellness, and Prevention in Physical Therapy 3
    HAY 525 Advanced Therapeutic Exercise 3
    HAY 545 Ethics and Health Care for Physical Therapists 3
    HAY 558 Evidence Based Practice Seminar 2
    HAY 602 Issues in Health Care Administration 3
    HAY 692 Clinical Internship II 8
    HAY 693 Clinical Internship III 10
    HAY 694 Clinical Internship IV 12

    Special Academic Requirements

    In addition to the academic policies of the school, a minimum grade of C- in HBA 540 Regional Human Anatomy is required for continued matriculation in the physical therapy program. For the remaining courses, each student must achieve a minimum grade of C+. Additionally, students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average to remain in good academic standing and participate in clinical internships.

  • Physician Assistant, MS

    Physician Assistant Program Leading to the Master of Science Degree

    Program Chair: Peter Kuemmel 

    The Department of Physician Assistant Education currently offers a graduate program leading to the Master of Science degree and the school’s Certificate of Professional Achievement for Physician Assistants. The program consists of approximately 100 weeks of pre-clinical and clinical instruction presented over a 24-month period.

    The program educates skilled professionals who, with physician supervision, practice medicine in all specialties and settings. Emphasis is placed on preparing graduates to work with physicians across a wide range of primary and specialty care settings. Students learn to take medical histories, perform physical examinations, order/perform diagnostic procedures and develop patient management plans. Patient education, counseling, and health risk appraisal are also important aspects of physician assistant education and practice, as is preparation for responsibilities related to the prescribing of medications. Students and graduates are educated and employed in settings such as private and group practices, hospitals, managed care settings, nursing homes, rural and urban out-patient clinics, correctional facilities, medical research facilities, and health administration.

    Physician assistants (PAs) are well utilized in health care because of the accessible, quality, cost effective care they provide. The physician assistant profession’s contribution to providing primary and specialty care services to underserved areas and populations is well recognized. In keeping with this commitment, PA education at Stony Brook is heavily directed toward community medicine involvement in the provision of medical services and graduates are encouraged to work in areas of medical need.

    The physician assistant program is fully accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) and the New York State Department of Education. Graduates are eligible to sit for the national certification examination for physician assistants, administered by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants.

    Admission Requirements

    The program Web site, https://healthtechnology.stonybrookmedicine.edu/programs/pa/elpa is the definitive source of information on admissions and provides comprehensive information on the program. For questions that are not addressed by the Website, please contact the program directly.

    Candidates for the physician assistant program must meet the admission requirements of the School of Health Technology and Management. The requirements may be fulfilled through previously completed college studies.

    In addition to the general academic requirements for graduate status in the school, the program specifies that fulfillment of the natural science requirement consists of completion of six courses in the biological sciences to include two courses in biology, one in genetics, one in microbiology, one in anatomy, and one in physiology.  In addition, the completion of four courses in chemistry to include two courses in general chemistry, one in organic chemistry, and one biochemistry.  Courses should be designated for science majors.  Preference for interview is given to applicants who will have completed all admissions requirements by the time of interview, whose courses are within seven years of application, and who apply early in the cycle.  

    The program also requires a minimum of one year or 1,000 hours of direct patient care experience.  This requirement can be fulfilled by paid or volunteer experience as an EMT, medical assistant, emergency room technician, etc.  For an application, please visit www.caspaonline.org . A required supplemental application is also required and can be found under the program materials section on the caspa website.

    Program Requirements

    The following professional courses must be completed prior to graduation from the Physician Assistant program:

    Didactic Courses
    Course # Title Credits
     HAP 501  Community Health and Service Learning for Physician Assistant   2
     HAP 504  Professional Practice Issues  2
     HAP 509 Integrative System Physiology  4 
     HAP 510  Clinical Laboratory Medicine  3
     HAP 512  Principles of Clinical Pharmacology  6
     HAP 516  Problem Based Learning (PBL)  .5 
     HAP 518  Medical Director Presentation Rounds  .5 
     HAP 521  Clinical Medicine I  5
     HAP 522  Clinical Medicine II  7 
     HAP 523  Clinical Medicine III  6
     HAP 524  Clinical Medicine IV  9 
     HAP 528  Genitourinary, Sexual and Reproductive Health  4 
     HAP 532  Diagnostic Imaging  2
     HAP 534  Introduction to Clinical Psychiatry  3
     HAP 545  Ethics and Health Care for PAs  3
     HAP 549  Clinical Skills for the PA Student  1
     HAP 551  Research Design and Evidence Based Medicine  2
     HAP 561  Masters Project I  1
     HAP 562  Masters Project II  1
     HAP 563  Masters Project III  1
     HBA 561  Human Gross Anatomy  5
     HBP 511  Pathobiology  3
    Clinical Courses
    Course # Title Credits
     HAP 570  Internal Medicine Clerkship  5
     HAP 571  Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship  5
     HAP 572  General Surgery Clerkship  5
     HAP 574  Emergency Medicine Clerkship  5 
     HAP 575  Psychiatry Clerkship  4
     HAP 576  Medicine Preceptorship  5
     HAP 577  Pediatric Preceptorship  5 
     HAP 579  Geriatrics Clerkship  5 
     HAP 580  Orthopedic Clerkship  4 
     HAP 581  Clinical Elective  4 

    Special Academic Requirements

    In addition to the academic policies of the school, each of the following courses must be passed with a minimum grade of C before a student is permitted to enter clinical clerkships:

    Course # Title Credits
     HAP 509  Integrative Systems Physiology  4
     HBA 561 Human Gross Anatomy  5 
     HBP 511 Pathobiology  3 
     HAP 512 Principles of Clinical Pharmacology  6 

    Each of the following courses must be passed with a minimum grade of C+:

    Course # Title Credits
     HAP 501  Community Health and Service Learning for Physician Assistant  2 
     HAP 504  Professional Practice Issues  2 
     HAP 510  Clinical Laboratory Medicine  3 
     HAP 516  Problem Based Learning (PBL)  1 
     HAP 518  Medical Director Presentation Rounds  .5 
     HAP 528  Genitourinary, Sexual and Reproductive Health  4
     HAP 532  Diagnostic Imaging  2 
     HAP 534  Introduction to Clinical Psychiatry  3 
     HAP 545  Ethics and Health Care for PAs  3 
     HAP 549  Clinical Skills for the PA Student  1 
     HAP 551  Research Design and Evidence Based Medicine  2
     HAP 561  Masters Project I  1 
     HAP 562  Masters Project II  1 
     HAP 563  Masters Project III  1 

    Clinical Medicine courses must be passed with a minimum grade of B-. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required to remain in good academic standing. Students must achieve a minimum grade of C for each clinical clerkship/preceptorship/elective, maintain a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average for all clinical clerkships, and successfully complete all summative evaluation requirements.

  • Post-Professional Physician Assistant, MS

    Post-Professional Physician Assistant Program Leading to the Master of Science Degree

    Program Director: Lynn-Timko-Swaim 

    As providers of medical care and members of the health care team, PAs must respond to new standards of practice, evolving delivery systems, changes in reimbursement procedures, shifts in population demographics, and the opportunities and challenges of technology. This part-time graduate program provides an opportunity for PAs to meet these challenges while obtaining their Master of Science degree. The Stony Brook Post-Professional Masters Program (PPMP) increases the depth and breadth of student medical knowledge beyond that attained during entry level PA education and prepares graduates for career advancement and leadership in areas such as administration, management, education and research. Optimally, this results in improved services to the patients and the communities that PPMP graduates serve.

    To satisfy program degree requirements, each student must complete a minimum of 30 credits including 18 required credits in the core curriculum and 12 elective credits. Core credits include evidence based medicine, ethics and health care, contemporary issues in health care delivery, clinical pharmacology, research writing, and clinical prevention and population health. Elective credits offer each student the opportunity to tailor the program to both his/her work setting and personal interests. The PPMP offers an on-line and an on-site format. Evening and weekend courses are offered at the Long Island and Manhattan locations in the traditional classroom-style setting for the on-site format program.

    Admission Requirements

    Applicants must possess a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university and have graduated from an ARC-PA accredited PA Program. Current NCCPA certification is required and an overall GPA of 3.0 is preferred. Applications and complete program information can be accessed online on the program’s website. Applicants must select on their application either the on-site or online format.

    Program Requirements

    Candidates must complete a minimum of 30 credits within five years. All core and elective requirements must be satisfied while maintaining a minimum program GPA of 3.0. The on-site format program requires that at least one course must be completed at the Stony Brook Long Island location. Students in the online format program can complete all course work online.

    Core Courses

    Candidates must complete the six core courses listed below (18 credits):

    Course # Title Credits
    HAP 505 Contemporary Issues in  Health Care Delivery 3
    HAP 511 Clinical Pharmacology Seminar for Physician Assistants 3
    HAP 541 Principles and Practices of Clinical Prevention and Population Health 3
    HAP 545 Ethics and Health Care 3
    HAP 552 Evidence Based Medicine: Evaluating and Applying Clinical Research 3
    HAP 554 Research Writing for  Health Professionals 3

    Electives

    In addition to those courses listed below, many courses in the SHTM Advanced Certificate in Health Care Management program can be used to fulfill elective requirements in the PA PPMP. These courses are described in the Advanced Certificate in Health Care Management section of this Bulletin. Registration for elective courses may require the permission of the Health Care Management program director. An added feature of the PA PPMP program is that students can apply for and complete the Advanced Certificate in Health Care Management while enrolled in the PA PPMP.

    Candidates must complete four elective courses (12 credits) from among the following and/or courses in the Department of HCPM:

    Course # Title Credits
    HAP 556 Teaching Strategies 3
    HAP 558 Epidemiology 3
    HAP 588 Practicum 3

    Registration for the Practicum (HAP 588) requires permission from the PPMP program director. Three to six credits of tutorial work in the areas of research, education, or administration may be completed as practica.

  • Polysomnographic Technology, BS

    Program in Polysomnographic Technology Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

    Program Director: Russell Rozensky

    The Polysomnographic Technology Program offers a full-time curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science degree.  Polysomnographic technologists are healthcare practitioners who use “high-tech” equipment to diagnose and treat patients with sleep disorders. They work with a wide variety of patients, from infants to the elderly. They provide services in many settings including hospitals, clinics, and physician offices. Students admitted into this program take several courses along with the students in the Respiratory Care program.

    Stony Brook University is accredited by Middle States Commission on Higher Education (http://www.msche.org). The Polysomnographic Technology Program is also an education program approved by the New York State Department of Education. The Polysomnographic Technology Program at Stony Brook University is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (http://www.caahep.org). The initial accreditation is valid from July 21, 2016 until July 31, 2021.

    Admission Requirements

    Candidates for the Polysomnographic Technology Program must meet the upper-division admission requirements of the School of Health Technology and Management. The requirements may be fulfilled through previously completed college studies. In addition to the general academic requirements for junior status in the School of Health Technology and Management, candidates must have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 and a minimum science GPA of 2.0. All prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C or better. The program also requires candidates to meet the degree requirements for the bachelor of science and successfully complete: 3 credits of English composition; 3 credits of arts; 3 credits of humanities; 3 credits of introductory (100 level) and 3 credits of intermediate or higher (200 – 400 level) social and behavioral sciences; 8 credits of anatomy and physiology or general biology with labs; 8 credits of chemistry with labs, 4 credits of physics with a lab, and 3 credits of statistics.  Certification in basic life support (BLS) from the American Heart Association is required prior to starting clinical rotations. To advance to junior status, Stony Brook students who declare polysomnographic technology as a four year major must meet the requirements described above and successfully complete HAT 210 with a grade of B or higher.

    Program Requirements

    Basic Science/Other Health Technology and Management Courses
    Course # Title Credits
     HAS 351  Research Literature & Design  1
     HAS 363  Computer Literacy for Health Professionals  1
     HAS 490  Research Tutorial  2
    Professional Courses (Junior Year)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAT 304  Cardiopulmonary Physiology  4
     HAT 306  Patient Evaluation  2
     HAT 309  Communication Skills for Health Care Professionals  2
     HAT 315  Pharmacology  4
     HAT 320  Cardiovascular Diagnosis and Treatment I  2
     HAT 331  Respiratory Care Techniques I  3
     HAT 470  Polysomnographic Technology I  3
     HAT 471  Polysomnographic Technology II  2 
     HHO 322  Instrumentation in Polysomnography  2
     HHO 324  Therapeutic Modalities in Sleep Medicine  3
     HHO 326  Introduction to Dental Sleep Medicine  4
     HHO 342  Sleep Disorder Pathophysiology  3
     HHO 470  Basic Polysomnographic Technology Clinical  4
     HHO 471  Intermediate Polysomnographic Technology Clinical  4
    Professional Courses (Senior Year)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAT 335  Medical Ethics  2
     HAT 410  Introduction to Clinical Education  2
     HHO 420  Polysomnographic Technology Management  3
     HHO 430  Pediatric Polysomnography  3
     HHO 440  Introduction to Electroencephalography  3
     HHO 460  Polysomnographic Technology Board Review  1
     HHO 472  Advanced Polysomnographic Technology Clinical  4
     HHO 476  Pediatric Polysomnographic Clinical  3
     HHO 479  Clinical Teaching in Polysomnographic Technology  4
     HHO 480  Basic Electroencephalography Clinical  3
     HHO 488  Polysomnographic Technology Management Clinical  4

     

  • Respiratory Care, BS

    Program in Respiratory Care Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree

    Program Chair: Lisa Johnson 

    The respiratory care program offers a full-time upper-division program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. Stony Brook freshmen are given the option to declare respiratory care as a lower-division major.

    Respiratory therapists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with heart, lung, and sleep disorders. They work with a wide variety of patients, from premature infants to the elderly. They provide services in many settings including hospitals, clinics, physician offices, nursing homes, and rehabilitation centers. Many are also taking advantage of opportunities in diagnostic labs (such as sleep, cardiac catheterization and pulmonary function) and in-home health care. Individuals who graduate from the program are employed as clinicians, managers, educators and researchers.

    The respiratory care program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC) [www.coarc.com] located at 1248 Harwood Road, Bedford, Texas 76021-4244, (817) 283-2835. The respiratory care program is also an education program approved by the New York State Department of Education. Stony Brook University is accredited by Middle States Commission on Higher Education Accreditation (last reaffirmed 11/19/09) located at 3624 Market Street, 2nd Floor West, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, Telephone: (267) 284–5000, www.msche.org. Graduates of the respiratory care program are eligible to sit for national board exams offered by the National Board for Respiratory Care, Inc. (www.nbrc.org/) and may pursue state licensure.

    The school’s Certificate of Professional Achievement and the University’s baccalaureate degree are awarded upon satisfactory completion of all coursework.

    Admission Requirements

    Candidates for the respiratory care program must meet the upper-division admission requirements of the School of Health Technology and Management. The requirements may be fulfilled through previously completed college studies.

    In addition to the general academic requirements for junior status in the School of Health Technology and Management, candidates must have a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 and a minimum science GPA of 2.0. All prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C or better. Minimum required courses include: 3 credits English composition; 3 credits of arts; 3 credits of humanities; 3 credits of introductory (100 level) and 3 credits of intermediate or higher (200 – 400 level) social and behavioral sciences; 8 credits of anatomy and physiology or general biology with labs; 3 credits of microbiology; 8 credits of chemistry with labs, 4 credits of physics with a lab, and 3 credits of statistics. Natural science courses (biology, chemistry, physics) less than 10 years old are preferred. The program also requires students to be certified in Basic Life Support (BLS) offered by the American Heart Association (valid certification card required) prior to starting clinical rotations.   An additional physics course with lab, logical and critical reasoning, and introductory and intermediate psychology courses are recommended. Science courses designated for science majors are preferred.

    To advance to junior status, Stony Brook students who declared a respiratory care major as freshmen must meet the requirements described above and successfully complete HAT 210 with a grade of B or higher.

    Program Requirements

    All respiratory care students must complete the following courses for successful completion of the upper-division program leading to the baccalaureate degree.

    Basic Science/Other Health Technology and Management Courses
    Course # Title Credits
     HAS 332 Management Concepts for Allied Health Professionals  1
     HAS 351 Research Literacy/Research Design  1
     HAS 355 Integrative Systems Physiology (replaces HBY 350 effective fall 2017)   4
     HAS 363 Computer Literacy for Health Professionals  1
     HAS 490 Research Tutorial  2
     HBA 461 Regional Human Anatomy  5
     HBP 310 Pathology  3
     HBY 350  Physiology (class of 2018 only)  
    Professional Courses (Junior Year)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAT 304  Cardiopulmonary Physiology  4
     HAT 306  Patient Evaluation  2
     HAT 309  Communication Skills for Health Care Professionals (class of 2018 only)  2
     HAT 315  Pharmacology  4
     HAT 320  Cardiovascular Diagnosis and Treatment I  3
     HAT 330  Pulmonary Pathology  3
     HAT 331  Respiratory Care Techniques I  3
     HAT 332  Respiratory Care Techniques II  3
     HAT 333  Pulmonary Diagnostic Techniques  3
     HAT 340  Cardiovascular Clinical*  2
     HAT 350  Basic Respiratory Care Clinical*  4
     HAT 353  Pulmonary Diagnostic Clinical*  2
     HAT 470  Polysomnographic Technology I  3
     HAT 475 Polysomnographic Technology I Clinical*  2
     HAT 487 Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Clinical*  2
    Professional Courses (Senior Year)
    Course # Title Credits
     HAT 335  Medical Ethics  2
     HAT 410  Introduction to Clinical Education  2
     HAT 411  Clinical Teaching in Respiratory Care*  4
     HAT 415  Respiratory Care Techniques IV  2
     HAT 420  Cardiovascular Diagnosis and Treatment II   3
     HAT 431  Respiratory Care Techniques III  4
     HAT 432  Perinatal Respiratory Care  4
     HAT 450  Critical Care Clinical*  5
     HAT 451  Perinatal Care Clinical*  4
     HAT 482  Physiologic Monitoring Clinical*  2
     HAT 494  Respiratory Care Board Review  1

    *Clinical practice consists of full-time clinical instruction and practice at the clinical affiliates and other affiliated patient-care facilities.

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