Health Sciences Bulletin

School of Social Welfare

  • Bachelor of Science

    Bachelor of Science

    The full-time, upper-division undergraduate program leads to a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in social work. The curriculum provides a foundation for generalist social work practice. Graduates are prepared for entry-level, professional social work positions in a wide range of health and human service institutions. The program comprises a sequence of courses and includes two terms of field education, two days per week. Field education placements are available in hospitals, nursing homes, schools, youth services and public and community social service agencies, among others. No credit will be given for life experience or previous work experience.

    Formal, institutional recognition of outstanding academic achievement is awarded to students in the form of a Dean’s list. An undergraduate student with at least a 3.75 grade point average in any semester will receive this distinction for that semester which will be reflected on the official University transcript.

    Academic Requirements for Admission 

    Applicants to the undergraduate program must achieve upper-division status before admission to the School. The School encourages applications from transfer students as well as applicants from Stony Brook University.

    Interested students are advised to complete all general University requirements by the end of their second year of undergraduate work. Refer to  DEGREE REQUIREMENTS in this Bulletin for general requirements. These include a minimum of 57 credits that must be earned prior to beginning the program. Within these credits, students must have completed courses providing a broad liberal arts base with core content in the following areas.

    • A minimum of one three-credit course in English composition, which develops proficiency in the composition of expository and argumentative essays. This requirement may be met by EGC 101: Composition 1, by having taken comparable course work at another institution or by scoring four on the English placement examination and completing a designated intensive writing course.

    • A minimum of one three-credit introductory course in biological sciences which provides an understanding of the major concepts of biology, including the cell, the gene, molecular biology, development and evolution, the human  implications and values associated with these concepts, and the impact of biology on human behavior. This requirement may be met by BIO 101: A Humanities Approach, or comparable course work at another institution.

    • A minimum of one three-credit course in natural sciences or mathematics in addition to the biology course.

    • A minimum of two three-credit courses in the humanities and/or fine arts.*

    • A minimum of one three-credit course in American political systems which provides knowledge about the organization of American government, including the Constitution, Congress, political parties, pressure groups, growth of the presidency, the Supreme Court, judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, and the Bill of Rights. This requirement may be met by POL 102: Introduction to American Government, or comparable course work at another institution.

    • A minimum of one three-credit introductory course in sociology or anthropology which provides an analysis of the principles of social structure through an examination of various forms of kinship, marriage, family, age group, voluntary associations, and various levels of political, judicial, religious and economic organization. This requirement may be met by ANT 102: Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology or SOC 105: Structure and Methods, or comparable course work at another institution.

    • A minimum of one three-credit introductory course in psychology which provides an understanding of psychology as the science of behavior, including content related to personality theory, social and developmental psychology, and psychological testing. This requirement may be met by PSY 103: Introduction to Psychology, or comparable course work at another institution.

    • A minimum of one three-credit course in American history (post-Reconstruction era) which provides knowledge of modern American history including industrialization, the impact of industrialization upon social, cultural and political life, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the resulting social and technological changes. This requirement may be met by HIS 104: United States Since 1877, or comparable course work at another institution.

    * Consult the School of Social Welfare for approved courses. Studio, design or skills improvement courses are not accepted.

    Graduation Requirements

    Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must:

    1. Meet the general requirements of the University that are described in DEGREE REQUIREMENTS in this Bulletin.

    2. Complete all course and field education requirements of the School of Social Welfare described in this section.

    3. Complete 55 credits in required courses in the School of Social Welfare program.

    4. Complete 12 credits of elective courses in social welfare.

    5. Complete a total of 124 credits of undergraduate work.

    6. Maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in the social work program.

    Organization of the Curriculum

    The curriculum in the undergraduate program is organized around five substantive areas of knowledge and skills: human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policy, social research, social work practice, and field education. The following program represents the curriculum for the Bachelor of Science student:

    Junior Year, Fall Term (15 Credits)

    Course #        Title                                                                                Credits

    HWC 304        Contemporary Social Justice Issues                              3

    HWC 308        Human Behavior and the Social Environment I              3
    HWC 310        Political Economy of Social Welfare                               3

    HWC 311        Social Welfare Policy, Services and Analysis                 3

    HWC 313        Research in Social Work I                                              3

    Junior Year, Spring Term (16 credits)

    Course #        Title                                                                                Credits

    HWC 300        Introduction to Fields of Practice                                    4

    HWC 305        Practice Processes in Social Work I                               3

    HWC 309        Human Behavior and the Social Environment II             3

    HWC 312        Social Welfare Policy and Institutional Oppression        3

    HWC 314        Research in Social Work II                                             3

    Senior Year, Fall Term (18 credits)

    Course #        Title                                                                                Credits

    HWC 301        Field Education I                                                             6

    HWC 306        Practice Processes in Social Work II                              3

    HWC 315        Integrating Seminar I                                                      3

                            Two Electives*                                                                6

    Senior Year, Spring Term (18 Credits)

    Course            Title                                                                               Credits

    HWC 302         Field Education II                                                           4

    HWC 307         Practice Processes in Social Work III                            3

    HWC 316         Integrating Seminar II                                                    3

                             Two Electives*                                                               6

    * Electives vary from term to term.

    1. Electives

    Students are required to take a minimum of 12 credits of electives to fulfill the curriculum requirements.   In addition to the choice of electives offered in the SSW, to satisfy that requirement, students may take two upper division electives relevant to social work that are taught outside the School of Social Welfare.  The course selected may be from those offered by a variety of departments within the University including those courses offered by other schools within the Health Sciences Center.  The content of the course must be in concert with the School’s mission and program objectives and in a subject not covered by the School’s curriculum offerings.  Prior to registering for such an elective, students must obtain approval from their advisor and the Director of the Undergraduate Program in writing.  Students may apply two electives from outside the program or from transfer into the program.

    1. Independent Study Policies and Procedures

    Students may elect to take an Independent Study as an elective. The student needs to obtain approval from his/her faculty advisor and register with an individual faculty member for Independent Study (HWC 395). The Independent Study needs to be in a subject area that is in concert with the School’s mission and program objectives, and is not covered already by the curriculum offerings. Students may register for 1-3 credits of independent study during their tenure in the program.

    An independent study proposal and bibliography should be signed and agreed upon by the student, the student’s faculty advisor, the member of the faculty who has agreed to sponsor the independent study and the Director of the Undergraduate Program before registering for independent study credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

    The independent study may not replace required course work. See BSW Independent Study Proposal:

     http://socialwelfare.stonybrookmedicine.edu/system/files/BSW Independent Study Proposal Cover Sheet.pdf

  • Master of Social Work

    Master of Social Work

    Pathways to the MSW Degree

    The graduate program prepares students for advanced social work practice. It provides students with the needed theoretical and practice expertise to function with maximum competence at different administrative or policy levels in social welfare fields and/or in the provision of direct services to individuals, families, groups, and communities. The school provides opportunities for study and practice that utilize the wealth of interdisciplinary resources available in the Health Sciences Center, the University, and community agencies throughout the New York metropolitan area.  The requirements of the MSW Program have been approved by the New York State Education Department as meeting the academic pre-requisites qualifying students to sit for both the LMSW and LCSW License Exams.

    Students who have graduated from a CSWE-accredited baccalaureate degree program in social work - within five (5) years from their initial matriculation are not required to repeat what has been achieved in their undergraduate program.

    Candidates for the Master of Social Work degree must:

    1. Complete all requirements for graduation in a period no longer than five years from the date of their matriculation at the school.

    2. Complete a minimum of 64 credits in courses approved by the school, of which a minimum of 16 must be in field education.

    3. Maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

    Curriculum

    The curriculum provides for a generalist foundation year of courses and field education for all students.  In the second year, students concentrate in advanced social work practice.  Some courses are offered in concentrated form during the semester, intersession and summer session.  Although some courses are offered for student convenience in Manhattan, be advised that in order to complete the program, all students are required to take some courses at the Stony Brook campus. At minimum, HWC 504 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I, HWC 505 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II, and HWC 506 Social Work in Health must be taken at the Stony Brook campus.

    Guided by the theme, social work in health/health in social work, the curriculum provides all social work students with basic knowledge of health programs, policies and practices and how they affect individual and societal well-being.  To give proper attention to health problems and their social consequences, the curriculum stresses health in social work by providing the knowledge and skills needed by all social workers, regardless of the setting in which they practice.

    1. Generalist Foundation

    In the first year, the array of courses and field education provides the basic professional foundation of knowledge, values and skills for social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.

    The professional foundation includes content on social work values and ethics, diversity, social and economic justice, populations historically devalued and oppressed, human behavior in the social environment, social welfare policies and services, social work practice, research and field education.

    First Year, Full-time MSW Requirements

    Fall Term

    Course #         Title                                                                                                Credits

    HWC 500        Field Education I                                                                                4-6

    HWC 504        Human Behavior and the Social Environment I                                 3

    HWC 509        *Foundations of Social Justice: Challenging Oppression                  3

    HWC 511        Research I                                                                                          3

    HWC 513        Social Work Practice I                                                                        3

    *formerly known as HWC 509 Parameters of Health and Social Policy I (for students who entered the SSW prior to 2017-18)

    Spring Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 501        Field Education II                                                          4-6

    HWC 505        Human Behavior and the Social Environment II           3

    HWC 510        Social Policy & Social Determinants                             3

    HWC 512        Research II                                                                    3

    HWC 514        Social Work Practice II                                                  3

    *formerly known as HWC 510 Parameters of Health and Social Policy II (for students who entered the SSW prior to 2017-18)

    1. Advanced Curriculum

    The program prepares students for advanced generalist social work practice in a variety of professional roles, including direct services with individuals, families, groups, and communities and in the analysis, development, implementation, management and evaluation of human services, and health policies and programs.

    Students with a baccalaureate degree from a social work program accredited by CSWE may apply for admission to the Advanced Standing Program.  Admission to this program is only awarded to graduates holding degrees from baccalaureate social work programs accredited by CSWE, those recognized through the International Social Work Degree Recognition and Evaluation Service, or covered under a memorandum of understanding with international social work accreditors. 

    Students applying for Advanced Standing are eligible to waive the following required courses: Human Behavior and the Social Environment (HWC 504 and 505), Research I and II (HWC 511 and 512), Foundations of Social Justice: Challenging Oppression and Social Policy & Social Determinants *Formerly named Parameters of Health and Social Policy I/II  (HWC 509 and 510), and Social Work Practice I and II (HWC 513 and 514), and Field Education I and II (HWC 500 and 501) if they have taken similar courses and received a grade of B or better.

    In addition to the required advanced social work practice courses and advanced field education experiences, students may choose from a variety of electives.

    Second Year, Full-time MSW Requirements

    Fall Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 502        Field Education III                                                         4-6

    HWC 506        Social Work in Health Care                                           3

    HWC 515        Advanced Social Work Micro Practice I                        3

    HWC 516        Advanced Social Work Macro Practice I                       3

    HWC 519        Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology                 3

    Spring Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 503        Field Education IV                                                         4-6

    HWC 517        Advanced Social Work Micro Practice II                       3

    HWC 518        Advanced Social Work Macro Practice II                      3

    * Two Advanced Practice Electives                                                       6

    1. Alternative Pathways

    In addition to the two-year, full-time option, the school has designed alternative pathways that retain the standard program requirements and quality.  Pathway I, the Advanced Standing Option, is open only to graduates of a CSWE accredited baccalaureate program in social work. Pathway II is open only to applicants already working the field of social welfare.  Eligibility for Pathway II is determined after admission to the school. Admission to the school does not guarantee approval to register as a Pathway II student.  Pathway III is open to all applicants who choose to complete the program in more than two years.

    1. Pathway I:  Advanced Standing

    Students who have graduated from a CSWE accredited baccalaureate program in social work within the past five years may apply for Advanced Standing. Students applying for this option must demonstrate their readiness to function at the level of a second year MSW student.  Students generally complete the program in one year, or may take a reduced program and complete the requirements in 1½ to two years.  Students spend three days in a field education setting for one academic year and must complete the required and elective courses.  Pathway I students cannot use their place of employment for their field placement and must earn all the 36 credits as matriculated students in the School of Social Welfare.                                               

    Pathway I:  Advanced Standing: Curriculum and Program Design (Full-time)

    Students who plan to complete the program in one year follow the program design outlined below.

    Fall Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 502        Field Education III                                                         6

    HWC 506        Social Work in Health                                                   3

    HWC 515        Advanced Social Work Micro Practice I                        3

    HWC 516        Advanced Social Work Macro Practice I                       3

    HWC 519        Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology                 3

    Spring Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 503        Field Education IV                                                         6

    HWC 517        Advanced Social Work Micro Practice II                       3

    HWC 518        Advanced Social Work Macro Practice II                      3

    *Two Advanced Practice Electives                                                       6

    *A minimum of six (6) Advanced Practice elective credits are required. Elective offerings vary from term to term. In addition, electives are differentiated between advanced practice electives and enrichment electives. Students are required to take a minimum of 6 credits of advanced practice electives.  (See Section V. B. Credits)

    Pathway I:  Advanced Standing: Curriculum and Program Design (Modified Full-time)

    Students who plan to complete the program in more than one year follow the program design outlined below:                       

    First Year, Fall Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 502        Field Education III                                                         6

    HWC 515        Advanced Social Work Micro Practice I                        3

    HWC 516        Advanced Social Work Macro Practice I                       3

    HWC 519        Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology                3

    First Year, Spring Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 503        Field Education IV                                                         6

    HWC 517        Advanced Social Work Micro Practice II                       3

    HWC 518        Advanced Social Work Macro Practice II                      3

    *Advanced Practice Elective                                                                 3

    Second Year, Fall Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 506        Social Work in Health                                                     3

    *Advanced Practice Elective                                                                  3

    *A minimum of six (6) Advanced Practice elective credits are required. *Elective offerings vary from term to term. In addition, electives are differentiated between advanced practice electives and enrichment electives. Students are required to take a minimum of 6 credits of advanced practice electives from the minimum required total of 9 elective credits. (See Section V. B. Credits)

    1. Pathway II: Employment-based Modified Program

    Students, who are currently working full-time in the field of social welfare and have had a minimum of three years paid, full-time, MSW supervised, social welfare experience, may apply for permission to use their agency of employment for two days of field education per week, for one year only. This field education experience must be separate and distinct from the student’s regular job responsibilities. Specific eligibility criteria for this pathway are in the Field Education Manual. The Office of Field Education must approve participation in this pathway and is responsible for coordinating and approving a field education plan submitted by the student and an approved field education supervisor.

    Pathway II students may not register for more than 4 credits (two days) of field education per term, or for more than three courses per semester. In addition to the standard daytime schedule, some required courses and some electives are offered in the late afternoon, evenings and weekends. Through this pathway, students may complete the degree requirements in 2½ to three years. Students in this pathway are therefore on a modified full-time schedule. See Pathway III for Curriculum Design.

    1. Pathway III: Modified Program

    This option is designed for students who choose not to follow the regular full-time schedule.  Students must take 12 to 13 credits each term while they are attending school, except in the term (or year) in which they are candidates for graduation when they may take fewer. The degree requirements are typically completed in 2½ to three years.

    The required courses are taken in the sequence indicated for regular full-time students.  In addition to the standard daytime schedule, some required and some elective courses are offered during late afternoons, evenings and weekends.  Students are not permitted to use their agency of employment for field education.  In some instances, field education may be taken during evenings and weekends if an educationally sound placement can be arranged.  In cases where this cannot be arranged, or it is determined by the field education faculty that such a placement is not appropriate for the students’ learning needs, students may need to complete one or both years of field education in a traditional time period.

    Pathway III students may not register for more than four (4) credits of field education per term.

    Pathway II and Pathway III Curriculum and Program Design

    First Year, Fall Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 500        Field Education I                                                            4

    HWC 504        Human Behavior and the Social Environment I             3

    HWC 511        Research I                                                                      3

    HWC 513        Social Work Practice I                                                    3

    First Year, Spring Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 501        Field Education II                                                          4

    HWC 505        Human Behavior and the Social Environment II           3

    HWC 512        Research II                                                                    3

    HWC 514        Social Work Practice II                                                  3

    Second Year, Fall Term

    Course #         Title                                                                                              Credits

    HWC 502        Field Education III                                                                             4

    HWC 509        *Foundations of Social Justice: Challenging Oppression                 3

    HWC 515        Advanced Social Work Micro Practice I                                            3

    HWC 516        Advanced Social Work Macro Practice I                                           3

    * HWC 509 Parameters of Health and Social Policy I (for students entering the SSW prior to 2017-18)

    Second Year, Spring Term:

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 503        Field Education IV                                                         4

    HWC 510        *Social Policy & Social Determinants                            3

    HWC 517        Advanced Social Work Micro Practice II                     3

    HWC 518        Advanced Social Work Macro Practice II                      3

    *HWC 510 Parameters of Health and Social Policy II (for students entering the SSW prior to 2017-18)

    Third Year, Fall Term

    Course #         Title                                                                            Credits

    HWC 506        Social Work in Health Care                                            3

    HWC 519        Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology                   3

    *Two Advanced Practice Electives                                                        6                      

    *Elective offerings vary from term to term. In addition, electives are differentiated between advanced practice electives and enrichment electives. Students are required to take a minimum of six (6) credits of advanced practice electives. (See Section IV. B. Credits)

    1. Pathway IV: Part-Time Program

    This option is designed for students who choose not to follow the regular full-time schedule.  Students must take the courses as prescribed. Courses are limited to two per semester for a total of six (6) credits.  After completion of the second year, students may register for more than six (6) credits. Part-Time students begin Field Education during the spring semester of their second year.  The degree requirements are typically completed in three to four years.

    Fall Class Schedule

    Part-Time Program - MSW Students (First Year)

    Course

    Title

    Credits

    HWC 509

    Foundations of Social Justice: Challenging Oppression

    3

    HWC 511

    Research I

    3

     

    Spring Class Schedule

    Part-Time Program - MSW Students (First Year)

    Course

    Title

    Credits

    HWC 510

    Social Policy & Social Determinants

    3                           

    HWC 512

    Research II

    3

     

    Fall Class Schedule

    Part-Time Program - MSW Students (Second Year)

    Course

    Title

    Credits

    HWC 500

    Field Education I

    4

    HWC 504

    Human Behavior in the Social Environment:

    Critical Applications of Social Work Theory

    3

    HWC 513

    Social Work Practice I

    3

     

    Spring Class Schedule

    Part-Time Program - MSW Students (Second Year)

    Course

    Title

    Credits

    HWC 501

    Field Education II

    4

    HWC 505

    Integrating Seminar                                             

    3

    HWC 514

    Social Work Practice II

    3

     

    Fall Class Schedule

    Part-Time Program - MSW Students (Third Year)

    Course

    Title

    Credits

    HWC 502

    Field Education III

    4

    HWC 515

    Micro Practice

    3

    HWC 516

    Macro Practice

    3

    *HWC

    Elective

    3

    *HWC

    Elective or (HWC 519) Psychopathology

    3

    *Psychopathology and Three Electives may be taken in any semester after the successful completion of the Second Year.

     

    Spring Class Schedule

    Part-Time Program - MSW Students (Third Year)

    Course

    Title

    Credits

    HWC 503

    Field Education IV

    4

    HWC 517

    Micro Practice

    3

    HWC 518

    Macro Practice

    3

    *HWC

    Elective or (HWC 519) Psychopathology

    3

    *HWC

    Elective

    3

    *Psychopathology and Three Electives may be taken in any semester after the successful completion of the Second Year.


    Additional requirements:  The following courses are required and may be taken in any semester after the successful completion of Year II courses:

    Psychopathology

    *Three Electives

    Part-time students will develop a curriculum plan with their advisors designating in which semesters they will enroll in these required courses. 

    *Elective offerings vary from term to term. In addition, electives are differentiated between enrichment electives and advanced practice electives. Part-time students are required to take a minimum of nine (9) credits of enrichment electives.                 

    1. *Special Focus Areas (*for students who entered the SSW prior to 2017-18)

    As part of their concentration year, second year students have the opportunity to develop specialized knowledge in a choice of specific areas as described below.

    The special focus areas share a similar structure, with some specific variation within each, and each specialization has a director who oversees the curriculum for the specialization.

    General special focus area requirements:

    • Students are required to do a full year of Field Education placement at a setting related to their specialization.  The placement may take place in the first or second year of the MSW program.
    • Students are required to take electives related to their specialization. Each specialization has a list of required/elective courses that qualify for the specialization (see individual specialization descriptions). Students are required to receive a B grade (3.00) or higher in the electives for the specialization.  Enrichment level courses may be required for some of the specializations. However, all MSW students also must complete 2 advanced practice electives before graduating.
    • Students are required to do their HWC 515 Advanced Social Work Micro Practice I and HWC 516 Advanced Social Work Macro Practice I written assignments on a topic related to their specialization. 

    Students are required to complete all requirements for the MSW Degree, including:

    • A total of 64 credits (36 credits for Advanced Standing students), of which at least six (6) credits will be the Advanced curriculum courses of the specialization.
    • At least 8 of the 16 credits of field education (12 credits for Advanced Standing students) in a setting related to the specialization.

    Students in the Modified pathways will not be able to pursue a specialization due to required course scheduling.

    The school offers five (5) specializations:

    • Health
    • Substance Abuse
    • Trauma
    • Social Work in Higher Education: Student-Community Development (SCD)
    • Community and Political Social Action
    1. Health

    Coordinator:  Dr. Michelle Ballan, PhD

    This focus area provides students with theory and practice skills in the analysis, development, implementation, management and evaluation of health programs, policies and practice and how they affect individuals and societal well-being; and prepares students to occupy both independent and interdisciplinary team roles in health promotion, prevention, patient care, research, planning and management. Particular emphasis is placed on dealing with traditionally disadvantaged and disempowered populations in accordance with the School’s mission.

    Completion of the following advanced practice electives:

    • HWC 581 Public Health and Community Health Intervention (Fall 2014)
    • HWC 584 Community Analysis and Health Promotion (Spring 2015)
    1. Substance Abuse

    Coordinator: Frances L. Brisbane, Ph.D.

    Assistant Director: Stephen Rabeno, Ph.D.

    Students may opt for a focus area in Substance Abuse.  Students enrolled in this specialization examine the history and development of policies and practice in the field of alcoholism and substance abuse.  This specialization addressees the wider implications that relate to program planning and development, public policy and prevention, ethical issues within a substance abuse context and the more specific issues of working with families, individuals, and groups in treatment and recovery.  Particular emphasis is placed on dealing with traditionally disadvantaged and disempowered populations in accordance with the School of Social Welfare’s mission. 

    Required elective courses:

    • HWC 544 Overview of Substance Abuse (Fall 2014) – enrichment elective
    • HWC 545 Individual and Family Treatment of Alcoholics and Substance Abusers (Fall 2014 at the Manhattan Site; Spring 2015 at Stony Brook Campus)
    • One of the following advanced practice electives:
      • HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Welfare: Treating Veterans and Their Families (Summer 2014)
      • HWC 578 Advanced Social Work with Groups (Fall 2014 or Spring 2015)
      • HWC 556 Proposal Writing in the Health and Human Service Fields (Spring 2015)
    1. Trauma

    Coordinator: Kathleen Monahan, D.S.W.

    This focus area will provide students with the advanced practice knowledge-base regarding the issues of trauma.   The specialization is founded on a strengths based perspective and examines the complex issues regarding the range of traumatic events, long-term negative sequelae, and the evidence-based treatments that provide intervention and support.  Cultural issues are a particular focus as well as legal, legislative and policy concerns.  Two advanced elective courses in the second year of the graduate program support this specialization.

    Completion of the following advanced practice electives:

    • HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Welfare:  The Dynamics of Child Sexual Abuse (Fall 2014)
    • HWC 579 Special Topics in Social Welfare: Therapeutic Interventions for Trauma (Spring 2015)
    1. Social Work in Higher Education: Student Community Development (SCD)

    Coordinator: Richard H. Morgan, Ph.D.

    The Social Work in Higher Education: Student-Community Development (SCD) Special Focus Area offers a unique focus on social work within higher education. This focus expands the arenas of social work practice, community organization and systems development to include the contemporary college campus. Students develop skills in providing direct interventions in response to a range of social issues that currently affect student communities nationwide such as multicultural relations, preventive mental health interventions, safety and strategies that promote student retention and success. The specialization emphasizes organizational and community development, social change and the strengths perspective as vital components of social work practice within various types of higher education learning communities.

    Required elective courses:

    • HWC 598 Issues in Higher Education (from Spring 2014) – enrichment elective

    or

    • HWC 566 Student-Community Development Student Portfolio Project (Fall 2014

    and

    • HWC 594 Student-Community Development Seminar II (Spring 2015)
    • Completion of one (1) of the following advanced practice electives:
    • HWC 578 Advanced Social Work with Groups (Fall 2014 or Spring 2015)
    • HWC 581 Public Health and Community Health Intervention (Fall 2014)
    • HWC 548 Adolescent development and Health Promotion (Fall 2014 or Spring 2015)
    • HWC 584 Community Analysis and Health Promotion (Spring 2015)
    • HWC 555 Supervision in Health and Human Service Organizations (Spring 2015 – online)
    1. Community and Political Social Action

    Coordinator: Carolyn Peabody, Ph.D.

    Rooted in a critical and structural analysis of the causes of social problems, the Community and Political Social Action special focus area builds on Foundation and Advanced Generalist knowledge, values and skills to further deepen students’ capacity to work for social change. This specialization enables students to gain a sharper focus on select areas such as community organizing, community development and political social work, which includes political advocacy, activism and advancing social workers as elected officials.

    Completion of two (2) of the following advanced practice electives:

    • HWC 556 Proposal Writing in the Health and Human Service Fields (Spring 2015)
    • HWC 579 Social Work in the Political Process – Campaign School (Spring 2015)
    • HWC 584 Community Analysis and Health Promotion (Spring 2015)

    1. *Special Focus Areas (*for students who enter the SSW in 2017-18 and beyond)

    Stony Brook University School of Social Welfare requires students to select a special focus area in their second year. The School has three special focus areas:

    • Integrative Health: Physical, Psychological, and Social Well Being
    • Families, Youth, and Transitions to Adulthood
    • Community, Policy, and Political Social Action

    All three special focus areas are offered on the Long Island campus. 

    The Manhattan campus offers the following focus areas:

    • Integrative Health and Families
    • Youth
    • Transitions to Adulthood

    Special Focus areas build on the generalist practice competencies that students have mastered in their first year courses and field placements. Focus areas offer the opportunity for students to develop both a deep and broad understanding of a domain of practice that will prepare them for a successful career path in that area of social work. Students will learn about all practice levels within a particular field—from policy and policy practice, to community services, to program development and leadership, to research, to evidence informed practice with specific populations.  Special focus areas offer students a state-of-the-art understanding of social work with a special focus on either integrative health, families and youth, or community action and social policy.  Students achieve advanced competencies in their chosen special focus area, and may note their achievements on their resume at graduation. 

    Integrative Health: Physical Psychological and Social Well Being

    The special focus area in Integrative Health recognizes that health is the result of many factors beyond genetics and germs.  While health care today includes both behavioral health and management of disease and illness, social workers bring essential skills to address many of the social, political, economic and behavioral causes of illness, including addictions and disabilities.   Health care today is delivered in both in-patient and out-patient settings and by primary care physicians in the community, and involves both community education and prevention, and treatment.  Because social conditions such as housing, income, food security, mental health and addictions, are responsible for 60% of all health outcomes, social workers are recognized as an integral part of the health team, offering mental health and addiction counseling, serving as care coordinators, and working in community organizations and health settings to design and implement prevention, coordination, and treatment interventions for populations in need.  Students interested in the following areas should consider this special focus area:

    • Addictions
    • Health Disparities and Chronic Illness
    • Aging
    • Disabilities
    • Mental Health
    • Trauma Informed Practice

    Families, Youth, and Transitions to Adulthood

    This Special Focus area recognizes that social conditions greatly impact the ability of families and children to be resilient, to endure as a unit of care and support,  to remain housed, to offer nurturance and sustenance, to succeed in the educational system, and to remain outside of the criminal justice system.  Other families, their communities, and community service providers strengthen families.  Social workers are the primary workforce in this domain of practice,  leading children and family organizations, developing policy, planning and implementing community programs, designing and supervising psycho-educational prevention programs, and providing individual, group, and family services to empower and assist clients in the community and in schools.  This special focus area will appeal to students interested in the following areas:

    • Child and Family Behavioral Health
    • Foster Care, Abuse, and Adoption
    • School Social Work
    • Practice in Higher Education
    • Homelessness
    • Domestic Violence and Criminal Justice
    • Trauma Informed Practice

    Community, Policy, and Political Social Action

    This Special Focus area recognizes that many of the problems faced by our clients and the communities in which they live result from the existence of inequality and from social policies that create, maintain and deepen both inequality and social injustice. In this Special Focus, students will in gain advanced skills in political social work including political analysis and social action to influence and shape policies that empower clients and communities and foster equality and human dignity. The Community, Policy and Political Social Action Focus Area strengthens and deepens students’ capacity to work for social change. This focus area enables students to gain a sharper focus on select areas such as:

    • Community organizing
    • Community Development
    • Political advocacy
    • Social Activism
    • Preparing for Elected Office and the role of staff in the office

    Courses and Field Practicum

    As students complete generalist course requirements (at the end of the first year for full time students, before entering for Advanced Standing Students, and at the end of the second year for modified students), they must select a Special Focus Area.  That selection will guide their second year field internships, enrollment in specialized courses, and elective choices.  The courses include:

    Policy Practice in Special Focus Area

    Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology

    Three Practice Courses in the Special Focus Area

    Three Electives associated with the special focus area from a menu of electives

    Students are also required to accept a second year field placement in the special focus area of the student’s choice, as designated by the Department of Field Education. 

    1. Dual Degree Program in Social Work and Law

    The School of Social Welfare and Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center offer a dual degree program in which full-time students may obtain both a Master’s degree in Social Work (MSW) and a Juris Doctor (JD) degree in law following four years of study.  This program reduces the amount of full-time study otherwise necessary to earn these two degrees if taken separately.

    Applicants for admission to the dual degree program must meet the separate application requirements of each program and must be accepted for admission by each school independently.  Applicants to the Law School must submit LSAT scores.  Applicants to the dual degree program may apply prior to enrollment or during the first year of enrollment at Touro College of Law. Students must be accepted to Touro College of Law prior to beginning their studies at the School of Social Welfare in order for credits to be accepted by Touro College.

    Details regarding the specific course requirements and their sequence for each degree, and the courses and grades for which each school will allow transfer credit, are contained in a brochure obtainable from the School of Social Welfare Office of Student Services.

    1. Individualized Elective Course Options
    1. Independent Study Policies and Procedures. Students may elect to take an Independent Study as an elective.  The student needs to obtain approval from his/her faculty advisor and register with an individual faculty member for Independent Study (HWC 595).  The Independent Study needs to be in a subject area that is in concert with the School’s mission and program objectives, and is not covered already by the curriculum offerings.  Students may register for 1-3 credits of independent study during their tenure in the program.

    An independent study proposal and bibliography should be signed and agreed upon by the student, the student’s faculty advisor, the member of the faculty who has agreed to sponsor the independent study and the Director of the Graduate Program before registering for independent study credit for a maximum of 3 credits. The independent study is determined to be either an enrichment or advanced practice elective in consultation with the Sponsor and Graduate Program Director.  The independent study may not replace required course work.  See Independent Study Proposal Form: http://socialwelfare.stonybrookmedicine.edu/system/files/Independent Study Proposal Cover Sheet_0.pdf

    1. Master’s Project
    1. Policies and Procedures. The following policies and procedures should guide preparation of the Master’s Project. All Master's Projects are considered Advanced Practice Electives as they are intended to explore a topic in depth. They provide a specific focus on social work practice issues and often address the interventive concerns related to the topic. Implications for social work practice are always addressed.

    Purpose. The project should reflect and demonstrate the student’s ability to organize and integrate core knowledge, specialty interest, and the school’s mission.

    Timing. Planning for the Master’s Project should start by the end of the student’s second semester. The Project must be completed and approved by the deadline dates established each semester in conjunction with the sponsor. 

    Articulation with other Curriculum Components. The Master’s Project is the culmination of the student’s ability to identify areas of a substantive nature using values, knowledge, skills and techniques acquired in field work placements and classroom courses.

    Credits. The Master’s Project shall be awarded three credits.  Students should register for HWC 507 with the section number of the Sponsor.  If the student does not complete the Project by the end of the semester, a Reserve (R) grade is recorded.  Students then register for HWC 508 Continuation of Masters Project (0 credits) the following semester.

    Grading. Letter Graded.  Following consultation with the reader, the sponsor determines the grade.

    Sponsorship. The student must select a member of the School’s full-time faculty who agrees to serve as a sponsor for the Project.  In addition, a second faculty member or approved content expert must be selected as a reader.  The reader’s role shall be determined through discussion among the sponsor, student, and reader.

    Prospectus. The student must first submit a written prospectus to the sponsor and reader for approval.  A copy of the prospectus with signatures of the sponsor and reader should be placed in the student’s file. 

    Evaluation and Approval. The sponsor and the reader have the authority to accept the final project.  They also have ongoing supervisory responsibility for suggesting revisions that the student shall incorporate in the final draft. 

    Types of Master’s Projects. The following are some categories of types of projects.  They vary in terms of format and methodological emphases.  All projects, regardless of type, must result in a final written product.

    • Analytic Essay. Analytic essays focus on specific issues and should include: (1) purpose, goals, and methodology; (2) a definition or redefinition of the issue; (3) review of the relevant literature; (4) description and documentation of the issue; (5) social, political, and economic context and implications of the issue; (6) critical analysis of current policy, practice, and services related to the issue; (7) implications of the analysis for policy formulation and/or practice that emphasizes a change strategy addressing the issue. Essays may also include program and training proposals that include a substantive component regarding the issue addressed by the proposal.

    Research Study. A Research Study may be qualitative, quantitative, or both.  Research projects should include: (1) statement of an interest, idea, hypothesis or problem; (2) purpose and objectives of the research; (3) review of the pertinent literature; (4) conceptual and operational definitions; (5) logic of the research design; (6) sample strategy when appropriate; (7) data collection methods, (8) findings; (9) analysis of data; (10) conclusions; (11) recommendations and/or implications. Please note that any research methodologies that involve human subjects must be approved through CORIHS. Please indicate whether CORIHS approval is being sought in such circumstances.

    • Audio Visual. The Master’s Project may take the form of an audio/visual presentation accompanied by a paper that includes the following (1) title page; (2) statement of the purpose of objectives of the project including intended use and audiences; (3) rationale for use of the audio/visual method; (4) description of steps for project development; (5) overview of project; (6) review of pertinent literature; (7) an assessment of the limitations, strengths, and weaknesses of the project; (8) the location and accessibility of the project for future use; (9) implications for social welfare.
    • Other Projects. The School welcomes creative projects that may not be covered by the above categories. A written description and analysis must be a part of all projects.
    • Group Projects. Group Projects are permissible as long as there is justification for the group format and each individual has an identifiable piece of work.

    Standards and Format. Preparation of the Master’s Project shall conform to the following general guidelines:

    Projects must be typewritten, double-spaced, with margins of 1 ½ inches on all sides, clean corrected copy, on 8 ½ x 11 paper, and in a uniform binder with label provided by the School.

    Projects shall meet the following minimum standards which will be used in reviewing the adequacy of and relative merit of the Project:

    •  Internal Consistency and Continuity
    • The adequacy of the Project shall be judged by the extent to which the explicit goals or objectives set forth in the project have been addressed and accomplished.
    • The content shall be internally consistent and free of contradiction; or, where such contradiction occurs, it is explained and interpreted.
    • The Project shall provide for continuity in the sense of showing the relationship of one part of the project to another and the relationship of each part to the overall purposes or objectives of the project.
    • Comprehensiveness
      • The Project must have an analytical component in that it covers or accounts for all of the main or salient points related to the subject.
      • The Project shall also be comprehensive in that it demonstrates an ability to synthesize or integrate a variety of conceptual and/or empirical material relevant to the field of social welfare.
    • Analytical
    • The Project must have an analytical component in the sense that the subject of the project is examined from some conceptual frame(s) of reference and is not merely descriptive in nature.
    • A test of the analytic nature of the Project is the extent to which meaning is attached to empirical data; interpretation of descriptive materials is made; and/or, implications, conclusions, or recommendations are drawn from whatever findings or descriptive materials is presented.
    • Clarity
      • The Project must meet minimal standards of clarity of exposition in that words are used correctly, explained and defined where necessary.
      • The project must be written in conformity with accepted standards of spelling, grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, and page numbering.
    • Completeness
    • The Project must meet the standards addressed above, and include:
      • title and author on outside cover of binder;
      • title page (see sample following);
      • 200-word abstract;
      • Preface and Acknowledgements;
      • Table of Contents;
      • Body of report to contain the following components:
      • statement of the general subject;
      • objectives or purpose of the project;
      • methodology;
      • conceptual framework;
      • literature review;
      • findings or descriptive data;
      • interpretative or descriptive data;
      • limitations of current study
      • conclusions;
      • implications for future research;
      • implications for social work practice;
      • appendices
      • references; and
      • appropriate footnotes in APA form.
  • Doctoral Program (PhD in Social Welfare

    Ph.D. in Social Welfare

    Program Purpose

    The primary purpose of the Ph.D. program is to produce scholars who can use systematic methods to develop through research, and disseminate through teaching and writing, knowledge concerning social welfare problems and policies.

    Drawing upon the social, behavioral and health sciences as well as social work knowledge and experience, the graduates of this program will have the skills to expand the base of tested knowledge that can guide the profession of social work in its efforts to address major social problems.

    A second purpose is to develop leaders and educators who can effectively contribute to contemporary social work practice as defined in this school’s mission statement, which can be found at: socialwelfare.stonybrookmedicine.edu/mission.

    The core of this program is education for scholarly research leading to careers as teachers, researchers, and policy analysts with a focus on the content areas of health, mental health, and substance abuse. The strength of such a program lies in its location within the Health Sciences Center. This is a natural setting in which to bring together the basic sciences and theoretical disciplines in applied policy/program analysis and thereby contribute to research in the social dimensions of health and mental health.  

    Program Structure and Content

    The structure of this program consists of 10 required classroom courses (30 credits) as follows:

    • Statistics I and II
    • Research Methods I and II

    • Qualitative Research
    • Social Welfare Policy Analysis I and II

    • Social Welfare Administration
    • Knowledge Building in Social Work: The Philosophy of Applied Social Research
    • Social Science Theory for Social Welfare

    • Seminar in Social Work Education


    In addition, the following are required:

    • A minimum of 3 electives (9 credits)
    • A research practicum (6 credits)
    • A teaching practicum (3 credits)
    • Qualifying exams
    • A dissertation seminar (6 credits)

    Also required are the successful passing of the qualifying exams and the production and defense of a scholarly dissertation. Fifty four (54) credits are required for graduation. In the first three years, students take three courses each semester. The full-time program is designed to be completed in a minimum of four years.

    Once all coursework and the comprehensive exam have been completed successfully, students select a preliminary dissertation chair and committee and develop an approved dissertation proposal. The student is then advanced to candidacy and begins dissertation research. The fourth year is spent on completion of the dissertation and defense. Completion of all work toward the degree is required within seven years of admission to the program.

    The Part-Time Option

    Students who are approved for the part-time option take a minimum of six credits each semester until the 54 credit sequence has been completed. In order to meet residence requirements, they must take nine credits in each of two consecutive semesters. Part-time students take their comprehensive qualifying exam at the end of the semester when 42 credits of required course work are completed (usually the second semester of the third year). At the end of the third year, once all coursework and the integrative paper are completed successfully, part-time students select a dissertation chair and committee. In the fourth year, they develop an approved dissertation proposal. They are then advanced to candidacy. Dissertation research begins in the fifth year.

    Criteria and Procedures for Admission of students

    The program has suspended admission for new students at this time.

    Newly admitted students may begin classes during the fall semester only. Applications for admission for the following fall should be received by February 1.

    Admission requirements include:

    • A master’s degree from a program accredited by the Council of Social Work Education.
    • Academic promise as evidenced by superior achievement in undergraduate and master’s level education.
    • Satisfactory performance on the Graduate Record Examination.
    • A personal interview.
    • Professional competence as demonstrated through substantial experience in responsible social work and/or human services positions supported by three letters of reference including one, if possible, from someone familiar with the applicant’s capacity to conduct research.
    • A sample of writing in the form of a published article, a manuscript submitted for publication, a document completed for the applicant’s agency or in connection with a research interest, or a paper prepared in your previous graduate studies.
    • Applicant has distinct interest in policy, research, and theory with regard to social welfare.
    • Personal qualities indicating a potential for leadership, compatibility with the School’s mission statement, flexibility and openness to new ideas, maturity, a spirit of inquiry, and a commitment to furthering the knowledge base of the profession of social work.
    • Competence in quantitative skills as evidenced by performance on the Graduate Record Exam and a college level course in statistics completed with a grade of B or better

    *Under special circumstances, applications from persons who do not meet all of these requirements will be considered. Applicants without the M.S.W. degree must have a master’s degree in a closely related field and must demonstrate a high potential for success in the program.

    Requirements for the receipt of the Ph.D. degree

    • One year in residence.

    • Satisfactory completion of all required and elective courses (54 credits).

    • Satisfactory completion of research and teaching practicum.

    • Satisfactory performance on the integrative paper.

    • Satisfactory performance on qualifying examinations.

    • Advancement to candidacy by vote of the Doctoral Committee upon successful completion of all course work and the integrative paper.

    • Completion of a dissertation.

    • Successful defense of the dissertation.

    A program summary booklet is available describing the Ph.D. program detail, its curriculum and requirements for admission. To receive a copy of this booklet, contact the School of Social Welfare’s Ph.D. program office in writing or by telephone at (631) 444-2138.

  • Dual Degree Program in Social Work & Law

    Dual Degree Program in Social Work and Law

    This program offers the opportunity to earn an MSW from the School of Social Welfare and a JD (Juris Doctor) from the Touro Law Center in four years, rather than the five that would be required if the degrees were earned separately. Applicants may apply for the dual degree program prior to matriculation or during their enrollment in the first year at either school. Applicants must apply to and be accepted by both schools. If accepted by both schools, the student is automatically eligible for the dual degree program. The first year may be spent at either school, with the choice being up to the student. The second year is spent at the other school, the third year is divided between the two schools and the fourth year is spent primarily at the law school.

    A detailed description of the program is available from the School of Social Welfare’s Office of Admissions and Student Services at (631) 444-3141.

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