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Stony Brook Archeologists Find the Earliest Evidence of Stony Tool Making in Cradle of Humankind 

morgan dicarlo

Our ancestors were making stone tools even earlier than we thought—some 700,000 years older. That’s the finding of the West Turkana Archaeological Project (WTAP) team—co-led by Stony Brook University's Drs. Sonia Harmand and Jason Lewis—who have found the earliest stone artifacts, dating to 3.3 million years ago, at a site named Lomekwi 3 on the western shore of Lake Turkana in northern Kenya.


Research News

Study Suggests Dinosaurs were Warm-Blooded

LED Safety

Dinosaurs grew as fast as your average living mammal, according to a research paper published by Stony Brook University paleontologist Michael D’Emic, PhD. The paper, to published in Science on May 29,is a re-analysis of a widely publicized  2014 Science paper on dinosaur metabolism and growth that concluded dinosaurs were neither ectothermic nor endothermic—terms popularly simplified as ‘cold-blooded’ and ‘warm-blooded’—but instead occupied an intermediate category. 

 

 

 

 

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