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Stony Brook University Experts

 

Economics

Michael Zweig, Ph.D is a Professor of Economics and founder and Director of the Center for the Study of Working Class Life at Stony Brook. Founded in 1999, the Center studies issues of class through the tools of the social sciences. Zweig also helped organize the Working Class Studies Association, which promotes models of working class studies that actively involve and serve the interests of working class people, as well as create the opportunities for critical discussions on the relationships among class, race, gender, sexuality, nationality, and other structures of inequalities. The association also promotes interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary approaches to studying and teaching the experiences of working-class people

Specific areas of expertise: Policy, labor and tax issues relating to working class life. 

Debra Sabatini Dwyer, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics. She is a policy analyst with an interest in applying evaluative science techniques to the functioning of the health and labor markets. She is particularly interested in market imperfections, policy interventions, and the consequences on behavior and well-being of individual agents. Her research primarily examines the retirement behavior of older workers and how poor health impacts their decisions. This has implications for Social Security Policy in predicting consequences of reform and for national health policy which has an impact on efficiency in the labor market. Her current research agenda is focused on the health market – including a study of childhood obesity and the role of school food policy, malpractice as a tool for promoting quality, patients self-treating in the health market as a consequence of the information boom, and evaluations of the health insurance delivery system in the U,S. 

Specific areas of expertise: Rational behavior in the labor market, health care services market failures, and evaluation techniques for evidence-based medicine.