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12/29/2017 Top 10 Moments of 2017 at Stony Brook UniversityStony Brook University is sharing a look back at some its most significant moments from 2017.
12/22/2017 Emerging Drug Could Help Treat a Common Liver DiseaseTreating a liver disease called NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis), which affects 10 to 15 percent of obese individuals with type-2 diabetes worldwide, is difficult. But now scientists believe they have found a pharmacologic approach that may inhibit NASH, and thus stop deadly conditions that result from NASH such as cirrhosis and liver cancer.
12/21/2017 ​Stony Brook Launches 1,650 New Graduates in December Commencement CeremonyLaunching 1,650 talented graduates into a promising future, Stony Brook University held its 20th annual winter commencement ceremony today in the Island Federal Credit Union Arena. During his commencement address, President Samuel L. Stanley Jr​. highlighted key elements of the Stony Brook experience, congratulated the accomplished graduating class, and celebrated the ​University's forward trajectory and diverse landscape. "Today we mark a bright new future for our graduates," President Stanley said. "I know behind each and every one of your degrees that there is a story; a story of hard work, a passion for knowledge, but ultimately perseverance, and today its success." ​T​he commencement ceremony honored recipients of 915 Bachelor degrees, 590 Masters degrees, 110 Doctoral and Professional degrees and 55 certificates.​
12/19/2017 New Occupancy Detection Device Designed to Save Home Energy UsePhotoelectric infrared (PIR) sensors are the current choice for occupancy presence detection in buildings. The sensors are used for smart thermostats to control heating and cooling based on occupancy. A major problem is that these PIR sensors only detect individuals who are moving. A Stony Brook University research team is developing a new type of PIR sensor that is equipped with an electronic shutter and other technologies that enable fast and accurate occupancy detection including individuals who are stationary.
12/15/2017 Computer Scientist and Biomedical Engineer Named Fellows of the National Academy of InventorsArie Kaufman, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, and Clinton Rubin, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Stony Brook University have been elected as Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).
12/14/2017 Wealth Inequality Increased in Ancient Times with Animal DomesticationAn analysis of 63 archaeological sites across North America, Europe, Asia and Africa by a team of international scientists, including Elizabeth Stone from the Department of Anthropology, revealed that wealth inequality increased over time and was tied to the rise of animal domestication. Published in Nature, the study used house size as a measure of wealth.
12/13/2017 Stony Brook Southampton Launches First-Of-Its-Kind Audio Podcast Fellow ProgramBeginning in August 2018, a new one-year Audio Podcast Fellows program will launched at Stony Brook Southampton/Manhattan in association with WSHU Public Radio. The first of its kind in the U.S., the Audio Podcast Fellow program offers students advanced training in all aspects of podcasting while they develop their own podcasts, from proposal to pilot to pitch. Stony Brook Southampton's Kathleen Russo, a producer of Alec Baldwin's "Here's the Thing" podcast, will direct the new Audio Podcast Fellows program.
12/12/2017 Study Reveals Skin Pigmentation Heredity is Not Straight ForwardMany studies suggest that the genetics of skin pigmentation are simple, as a small number of known genes account for nearly 50 percent of pigment variation. A new study published in Cell counters this scientific view and suggests that while skin pigmentation is nearly 100 percent heritable, it is not a straightforward trait in humans.
12/11/2017 ​New Professorship to Study One of the World's Oldest LanguagesWith literary works dating as far back as 300 BCE, the Tamil language is nearly as old as Hebrew (335 BCE), and stands next to Chinese as the most enduring classical language still spoken today. Yet remarkably, while dozens of U.S. colleges and universities have Hebrew or Chinese language and cultural studies programs, only a handful offer Tamil.
12/5/2017 New Reef Aims to Bring Oysters Back to Long IslandThe first oyster reef on Long Island has been installed in Shinnecock Bay by Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) researchers. The installation is a conservation effort to rejuvenate oyster reproduction on Long Island and help improve and maintain clean water.
11/29/2017 New Nursing PhD Program Answers Need for More Nurse ScientistsThe Stony Brook University School of Nursing is launching a PhD in Nursing that will begin in the summer of 2018. The PhD in Nursing Program emphasizes education and training at the highest level in order to develop the next generation of nurse scientists and educators skilled in research methodologies useful in all areas of nursing science to improve the health and well-being of the population.
11/22/2017 Stony Brook University President's Statement on Tax ReformIn response to recent Congressional tax reform negotiations, Stony Brook University President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., said today "As tax reform negotiations continue, I urge leaders in Congress to consider the adverse impacts of proposed provisions on students, research and the State of New York. The provisions proposed would significantly increase costs for graduate students, hurt institutional stability by bringing about a reduction in charitable giving, and result in a decrease in federal funding availability for research and financial aid. In addition, the elimination of the state and local income tax deduction (SALT) would cause a brain drain in New York, resulting in a reduction in state services and support for areas like higher education. Increasing the tax burden on students and universities will make quality higher education less accessible and limit groundbreaking research conducted in the United States.
11/21/2017 Stony Brook University Scholar & Future Diplomat Wins Prestigious Rangel FellowshipFollowing a highly competitive nationwide contest, Stony Brook University senior Lydia Senatus '18 has been awarded a 2018 Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Fellowship. The fellowship supports extraordinary individuals seeking to pursue a career in the U.S. Foreign Service. Funded by the U.S. Department of State and managed by the Ralph J. Bunche International Affairs Center at Howard University, the fellowship provides:
11/21/2017 Energy Scientist and Pediatric Physician Researchers Named Endowed Chairs at Stony Brook University CeremonyAt an investiture ceremony on the Stony Brook University campus, three new endowed chairs were formally appointed; two leading pediatric clinical research physicians at Stony Brook Children's Hospital and a renowned materials scientist and chemical engineer at the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The three new endowed faculty positions were funded by philanthropic gifts from the Knapp family through the Knapp Swezey Foundation, Island Outreach Foundation, and Jane and William Knapp respectively.
11/15/2017 White Paper Provides Tools to Manage Opioid Use Disorder in PregnancyA new white paper designed to provide New York State healthcare providers and communities with the tools to manage and reduce opioid use disorder in pregnancy has been released by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), District II. David Garry, DO, a Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, and Co-Chair of the ACOG District II Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy Task Force, believes the white paper highlights key solutions that could help women's healthcare providers statewide care for women struggling with addiction and encourage providers to become buprenorphine prescribers.
11/13/2017 Investment Portfolio Theory Helps Scientists Predict Animal Population Growth, Disease SpreadPopulation demography of plants, animals and microbes that cause diseases is central to understanding many problems in ecology, evolution and conservation biology. Scientists have had limited information on collections of living populations to understand and predict what happens when you have many populations spread across vast geographic areas. Most research has focused only on local populations at small scales. A study published in PNAS details a new "landscape portfolio" theory that is based on Markowitz's "portfolio theory" in economics, melded with ecological landscape theory to predict population growth of living things.
11/10/2017 Governor Cuomo Announces Completion of Energy Efficiency Project at Stony Brook UniversityGovernor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the completion of a comprehensive energy efficiency project at Stony Brook University in Suffolk County that will save the campus more than $832,000 in annual energy costs while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions by more than 3,800 tons a year - the equivalent of taking more than 730 cars off the road. The project support's Governor Cuomo's goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent by 2030, which is part of the Governor's Reforming the Energy Vision strategy to build a statewide energy system that is clean, resilient and affordable for all New Yorkers.
11/6/2017 Caribbean Islands Reveal a "Lost World" of Ancient MammalsAlthough filled with tropical life today, the Caribbean islands have been a hotspot of mammal extinction since the end of the last glaciation, some 12,000 years ago. Since people also arrived after that time, it has been impossible to determine whether natural changes or human influence are most responsible for these extinctions. A new review by an international team of scientists, including Stony Brook University Professor Liliana M. Dávalos, reports an analysis of the incredibly diverse "lost world" of Caribbean fossils that includes giant rodents, vampire bats, enigmatic monkeys, ground sloths, shrews and dozens of other ancient mammals. The article, published today in the Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, reveals that the arrival of humans and their subsequent activities throughout the islands was likely the primary cause of the extinction of native mammal species there.
11/1/2017 Using an Electronic Device to Detect Cavities EarlyImagine if dentists could find clear signs of tooth decay long before dental lesions turn into cavities and without using X-rays. A new device cleared for commercialization this month by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a potential tool for dentists to do just that. Developed and patented by researchers in the Division of Translational Oral Biology in the Department of Oral biology and Pathology at Stony Brook University School of Dental Medicine, and licensed to Ortek Therapeutics, Inc., the Electronic Cavity Detection (ECD) System uses electrical conductance to diagnose and monitor enamel lesions on the biting surfaces of molars and premolars.
10/26/2017 Bamboozled! Climate Change Pushing Greater Bamboo Lemur Closer to the Brink of ExtinctionHuman disturbance of tropical rainforests in Madagascar including wildfires, burning and timber exploitation, have led to reduced rainfall and a longer dry season, further pushing the already critically endangered Greater Bamboo Lemur to the brink of extinction. Findings are published in a new study from primatologist and lemur expert, Patricia Chapple Wright of Stony Brook University, evolutionary biologist Jukka Jernvall of University of Helsinki in Finland, and colleagues, entitled Feeding Ecology and Morphology Make a Bamboo Specialist Vulnerable to Climate Change, in the Oct. 26 online edition of Current Biology.
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