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8/29/2015 (Detroit Free Press) Be generous: It's a simpler way to stay healthier"Volunteering moves people into the present and distracts the mind from the stresses and problems of the self," said Stephen G. Post, founding director of the Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care, and Bioethics at Stony Brook University School of Medicine in New York. "Many studies show that one of the best ways to deal with the hardships in life is not to just center on yourself but to take the opportunity to engage in simple acts of kindness."
8/30/2015 (MSN News) Here Comes the Bionic Brain!Sure, some of this technology is still in its infantile stages. In May, American researchers at UC Santa Barbara and Stony Brook University became the first to teach machines how to recognize specific letters in an image -- meaning, basically, robots had just graduated kindergarten. Under Furber's direction, British engineers are now building a machine capable of simulating the activity of 1 billion neurons.
8/31/2015 (Newsday) Stony Brook athletic director Shawn Heilbron's goal: Raising $100 millionFrom the moment he first set foot on Stony Brook's campus to take over as athletic director in May 2014, Shawn Heilbron said his vision was to build a football program powerful enough to drive the fundraising necessary to put the New York state school with the funny name on the major-college athletic map.
8/28/2016 (Times Beacon Record) Stony Brook's Tannenbaum uses math to tackle cancerAllen Tannenbaum, a professor of computer science and applied mathematics and statistics at Stony Brook University, has added a field called graph theory to some of the tools he knows well from his work in medical imaging and computer vision. A normal, healthy cell is like a factory, with genes sending signals through proteins, enzymes and catalysts, moving reactions forward or stopping them, and the genetic machinery indicating when and how hard the parts should work. Cancer, however, is like a hostile takeover of that factory, producing the factory equivalent of M16s that damage the cell and the individual instead of baby toys, Tannebaum suggested.
8/28/2015 (Good Morning America) New Research Finds Rise in Injuries Caused by Walking and TextingStony Brook University researchers examined texting and distractions. They created a test/obstacle course as part of their study to show how hard it is to concentrate on anything else while you are on your phone including walking.
8/27/2015 (Albany Democrat Herald-Oregon) Be generous: It's a simple way to stay healthier"Volunteering moves people into the present and distracts the mind from the stresses and problems of the self," said Stephen G. Post, founding director of the Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care, and Bioethics at Stony Brook University School of Medicine in New York. "Many studies show that one of the best ways to deal with the hardships in life is not to just center on yourself but to take the opportunity to engage in simple acts of kindness."
8/28/2015 (Robotics Tomorrow) Stony Brook University Helps Prepare Next Generation of Farmers by Introducing a Hydroponic 'Freight Farm' on CampusCited as 4th most environmentally responsible university* in 2015,Stony Brook University is first higher ed campus to get a Freight Farm. This fall, Stony Brook University is introducing a fresh new technology - a hydroponic Freight Farm - where student farmers can grow crops year-round in an indoor environment. Created in a discarded shipping container converted into a fully operational hydroponic farm known as the Leafy Green Machine, the Freight Farm will be primarily managed by Stony Brook students.
8/26/2015 (New York Times) A Gorilla Match (or 5) at the Bronx ZooDr. Carl Safina, who is a professor at Stony Brook University, has traveled the world observing animals in the wild, including elephants, dolphins, wolves and albatrosses, and says the more he sees, the more he is convinced that many animals experience love in the same way humans do.
8/25/2015 (Inside Philanthropy) Longtime Actor, Longtime Giver: A Look at Alan Alda's PhilanthropySpecifically, Alda has an interest in making science more accessible to the general public. He founded the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University, which develops "innovative programs that enable scientists to communicate more effectively with the public." He also originated the Flame Challenge, a yearly international competition for scientists in which they compete to "explain complex scientific concepts so that 11-year-olds can understand them."
8/26/2015 (Yahoo News) Here Comes the Bionic Brain!Sure, some of this technology is still in its infantile stages. In May, American researchers at UC Santa Barbara and Stony Brook University became the first to teach machines how to recognize specific letters in an image -- meaning, basically, robots had just graduated kindergarten. Under Furber's direction, British engineers are now building a machine capable of simulating the activity of 1 billion neurons.
8/26/2015 (FiOS1) Stony Brook University gives hundreds of kids a reason to smile'Give Kids a Smile' day is a national event offering free teeth cleanings to families with little or no access to healthcare
8/25/2015 (Scientific American) The Growing Global Battle Against Blood-Sucking TicksNow, a new and potentially improved vaccine has completed safety trials. Developed by researchers at Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, and licensed to Baxter Innovations in Vienna, the vaccine is similar to LYMErix in that it targets OspA, but it does not contain the protein segment that some scientists and consumers feared could cause an autoimmune reaction. It also contains several variants of OspA, so it protects against many Borrelia species known to cause Lyme in humans, including those that affect people in Europe.
8/25/2015 (Scientific Computing) Science Advocate and Emmy Award-Winning Actor Alan Alda to Open SC15 SC15 announces that noted science communicator and award-winning actor Alan Alda will discuss the role of science in our society and the intersection of science and computing as he delivers the conference keynote address November 17, 2015 in Austin, TX. Alda -- actor, writer, science advocate and visiting professor at Stony Brook University -- will share his passion for science communication and its importance, drawing on his personal experiences, including his 11 years as host of the TV series Scientific American Frontiers.
8/24/2015 (The Lakeland Ledger) Being generous can lengthen your life, studies show"Volunteering moves people into the present and distracts the mind from the stresses and problems of the self," said Stephen G. Post, founding director of the Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care, and Bioethics at Stony Brook University School of Medicine in New York. "Many studies show that one of the best ways to deal with the hardships in life is not to just center on yourself but to take the opportunity to engage in simple acts of kindness."
8/24/2015 (NPR/"Brian Lehrer Show") The Study of MenSecond wave feminism started "women's studies" as an academic subject in response to the social sciences written by and for men. Michael Kimmel, professor of sociology and gender studies at Stony Brook University, where he directs the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities, and the author of Guyland: The Perilous World Where Boys Become Men (Harper Perennial, 2009), makes the case for adding "masculine studies" to the curriculum.
8/23/2015 (Newsday) International students coming to LI in record numbersAbout two-thirds of the international students on the Island are expected to attend Stony Brook and NYIT. More than 500 are slated to go to Nassau Community College and Suffolk County Community College.
8/24/2015 (Wall Street Journal) Avoid This Color in Your Business PlanThe results? Investors were more likely to invest in a business plan that had images of the product or prototype. And using the color red in logos or elsewhere scared off investors. The authors, Richard Chan, an assistant professor of organizational behavior at Stony Brook University's College of Business in Stony Brook, N.Y., and H. Dennis Park, an assistant professor at Drexel University's LeBow College of Business in Philadelphia, say the study provides evidence that rapid-fire investment choices rely partially on heuristics--mental shortcuts that help people arrive at a decision quickly.
8/23/2015 (NPR/"Weekend Morning Edition") Rape Case Raises Troubling Issues At St. Paul's School, Sociologist SaysSaint Paul's is the elite boarding school in New Hampshire that educated Secretary of State John Kerry and many other prominent alumni. And that school is now at the center of a rape trial. More than a year ago, as Owen Labrie was finishing his senior year, he took part in a school ritual known as the Senior Salute. Older students are supposed to sexually proposition younger ones. Labrie chose a 15-year-old girl and then allegedly raped her. He has pled not guilty and says their encounter was consensual. This past week, his accuser took the stand to make her case. Michael Kimmel is the director of the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities at Stony Brook University. And in a couple of weeks, he will address the faculty at St. Paul's School. He joins us on the line from Chicago. Thanks so much for being with us.
8/19/2015 (Fresh Plaza) Stony Brook University introduces hydroponic 'Freight Farm' on campusThis fall, Stony Brook University is introducing a fresh new technology - a hydroponic Freight Farm - where student farmers can grow crops year-round in an indoor environment. Created in a discarded shipping container converted into a fully operational hydroponic farm known as the Leafy Green Machine, the Freight Farm will be primarily managed by Stony Brook students.
8/18/2015 (KQED/NPR "Forum with Michael Krasny") The Growing Field of Men's StudiesStudents at Stony Brook University in New York will soon be able to earn a masters degree in "masculinities studies." The new program symbolizes increased attention to how masculinity is treated across cultures and disciplines. At the recent International Conference on Masculinities, seminars ranged in topics from mental health to fatherhood to friendship. We'll explore the growing academic field of men's studies and what we're teaching today's young men about masculinity.
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