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8/18/2016 School of Dental Medicine and Traverse Biosciences to Advance Emerging Treatment for Periodontal DiseaseThe Stony Brook University School of Dental Medicine and Traverse Biosciences have received a $1.3 million award from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to further evaluate the pre-clinical safety and effectiveness of the Traverse Biosciences' leading drug candidate, TRB-N0224, for the treatment of periodontal disease. The research will be led by Lorne Golub, DMD, in the Department of Oral Biology and Pathology, and Ying Gu, PhD, DDS, in the Department of General Dentistry at the School of Dental Medicine. They will serve as co-principle investigators of the award, in close collaboration with Traverse Biosciences.
8/11/2016 Mount Sinai and Stony Brook Announce AffiliationStony Brook Medicine and the Mount Sinai Health System today announced that they are entering into an affiliation agreement that includes collaboration on research, academic programs and clinical care initiatives, effective immediately. The institutions launched the partnership to heighten academic and research synergies and to promote discovery, provide expanded clinical trials for both institutions, and achieve breakthroughs in understanding and treating disease.
8/8/2016 T2K Scientists Say New Findings Provide Insight to Why the Universe is Dominated by Matter and Why we ExistNew findings that reveal why the universe is dominated by matter and why we exist was presented by the international T2K Collaboration at the 38th International Conference on High Energy Physics in Chicago. Stony Brook University physicist Professor Chang Kee Jung, a leading member of the T2K Collaboration, explained at the conference how the T2K Collaboration can now demonstrate why matter and antimatter are different.
7/12/2016 New Method to Model Protein Interactions May Help Accelerate Drug DevelopmentProtein-protein interactions (PPIs) are the basis of cellular functions, and when these processes are compromised diseases such as cancer emerge. For years scientists have tried with mixed success to map out PPIs to understand cellular processes. Now a team of international scientists led by Stony Brook University researchers have created an ultra-fast way to model protein interactions. The method may help pave the way to design drugs that prevent problematic protein interactions that lead to disease. The findings are published in the early online edition of PNAS.
6/27/2016 New Promise Against Deadly Global Fungal InfectionsSystemic fungal infections cause more than one million deaths annually, and treatments against these infections are often not effective due to drug resistance or toxicity. Maurizio Del Poeta, MD, a Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology at Stony Brook University, expects to change the landscape of treatment against fungal infections with new approaches based on his laboratory research and collaborative work with fungal experts worldwide. Recognizing the widespread need for better antifungal treatments and the promise of Dr. Del Poeta's work, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is funding his research with two grants totaling $6 million.
6/23/2016 Getting to the Heart of Chronic Fatigue SyndromeBy better understanding daily activity levels and heart rate patterns of those who suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), scientists hope to discover more about this complex illness condition. Fred Friedberg, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, has received a four-year $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to take this research approach to determine if heart rate fluctuations in combination with certain daily activity patterns can be used to predict or prevent relapse in people with CFS.
6/21/2016 Stony Brook's Clean Water Technology Center Proposes Replacement for LI Cesspools that Removes Nitrogen & Other ContaminantsThe New York State Center for Clean Water Technology at Stony Brook University issued a white paper introducing a potential replacement for Long Island cesspools that has shown an ability to remove high amounts of nitrogen from household wastewater, a contaminant identified as the primary cause of local water quality degradation on Long Island. The system incorporates simple design with locally-sourced, natural materials in order to position it as an economically viable alternative for high performance onsite wastewater treatment, a crucial infrastructure need for restoring Long Island water quality. Pilot installations of the system are underway at a test center, and scheduled to begin locally by early fall as part of the Suffolk County Department of Health Services demonstration program for innovate/alternative septic treatment systems.
6/13/2016 Activity of a new Synthetic Compound may be key to Cleaner Nuclear EnergyAn international team of researchers has discovered a new synthetic compound that acts to adsorb Xenon, an element and volatile radioactive waste commonly released by nuclear energy plants. Adsorption is a process in which molecules from a substance, in this case Xenon, collects on the surface of another substance. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, may prove to be a major step toward developing a better way to dispose of nuclear waste and improve the process of creating cleaner nuclear energy, which remains a viable alternative to the fossil-fuel based economy.
6/2/2016 Could Controlling the p73 Gene be the key to Treating Chronic Lung Disease?Rising global air pollution and increasing smoking prevalence in many developing nations will likely lead to a growing incidence of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which currently affects more than 330 million people worldwide, is the third-leading cause of death and carries an estimated healthcare cost of $2.1 trillion. Treating COPD and other related lung conditions such as asthma, remain challenging. Now Stony Brook University researchers believe the key to discovering better treatments for chronic lung diseases sits with the p73 gene.
5/26/2016 'Wonderful' and 'Thankful' Versus 'Battle' and 'Enemy' -- Do Women and Men Communicate Differently?In a computational analysis of the words used by more than 65,000 consenting Facebook users in some 10 million messages, it was discovered that women use language that is warmer and more agreeable than men. Additionally, algorithms of language use predicted one's gender on Facebook 90 percent of the time. The findings are published in PLOS ONE.
5/18/2016 CAREER Award Enables Physicist to Advance Research on the Origins of NeutrinosJoanna Kiryluk, PhD, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Stony Brook University, has received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF).
5/9/2016 Withdrawn Children Display Predictable Brain Activity During Social InteractionsA study using functional-MRI brain scanning reveals certain areas of the brain have higher activity in children who are socially withdrawn or reticent compared to children who are not withdrawn. Led by Stony Brook University psychologist Joanna M. Jarcho, PhD, the study involved fMRI of the children while they experienced a "cartoon classroom" that featured themselves as the new student in the school involved in various social interactions. The findings, published online first in Psychological Science, provide a better understanding of the brain activity of socially withdrawn children and could help form a foundation to teach children how to think differently about social interactions and thus prevent further socially withdrawn behavior or social anxiety.
5/6/2016 Manipulation of Specific Neurons Helps to Erase Bad Memories, Enhance Good OnesImagine if memory could be tuned in such a way where good memories are enhanced for those suffering from dementia or bad memories are wiped away for individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder. A Stony Brook University research team has taken a step toward the possibility of tuning the strength of memory by manipulating one of the brain's natural mechanisms for signaling involved in memory, a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine. Their findings are published in the journal Neuron.
5/3/2016 Google This: Five Computer Science Faculty Receive Google Research AwardsA record-setting five faculty from the Department of Computer Science (CS) in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences have received prestigious Google Faculty Research Awards, which support innovative research of new technologies developed by university faculty worldwide.
5/2/2016 Titanium Dioxide Exposure Increases Risk of Bacterial InfectionWhen human cells are exposed to titanium dioxide without the presence of UV light from the sun, the risk for bacterial infection more than doubles. This finding by a Stony Brook University-led research team, published early online in the Journal of Nanobiotechnology, raises concerns about exposure to titanium dioxide, a nanoparticle commonly used in millions of products worldwide ranging from cosmetics to toothpaste, gum, food coloring, and medicines.
4/15/2016 Computer Scientist Receives CAREER Award to Make Portable Parallel Programming PossibleRezaul Chowdhury, PhD, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The award will help to advance his research on developing theories and efficient tools to facilitate the design of portable parallel algorithms to be used in computing platforms ranging from small laptop computers to massive supercomputers.
3/29/2016 New Method to Identify Nanoparticles in Tissue May Shed Light on their Health ImpactA team of researchers from Stony Brook University, SUNY Polytechnic Institute, and George Washington School of Medicine have demonstrated a pioneering method for the rapid visualization and identification of engineered nanoparticles in tissue. The research, detailed in a paper published in Microscopy Research and Technique, is a cost-effective hyperspectral imaging method for nanomaterial analysis that may shed light on nanomaterials' potential health impacts.
3/24/2016 CAREER Award Enables Computer Scientist to Expand Research on Game TheoryJing Chen, PhD, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The award will help to advance her research on mechanism design that has impact on computation and rationality problems in areas such as game theory, economics and social sciences.
3/15/2016 Study Shows Sharkskin Increases Drag by 50 PercentThe nature of sharkskin with its riblets - the micro-grooved structures found in aircraft wings, wind turbine blades, and Olympic-class swimsuits - seems to suggest a design for speed and streamlined swimming. But a new study led by Stony Brook University using computational models demonstrates that the denticles that make up mako shark skin increase hydrodynamic drag by up to 50 percent. The study is published this week in the journal Physics of Fluids.
3/14/2016 Professor Researching Next Generation of High-Strength Metals Receives NSF CAREER AwardJason Trelewicz, PhD, an Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Stony Brook University (SBU), has received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The award will help to advance his research aimed at transforming applications of high-strength metals.
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