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2/7/2017 Stony Brook Mathematics Professor Receives International RecognitionRobert D. Hough, PhD, Assistant Professor of Mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences at Stony Brook University, was awarded the David P. Robbins Prize by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA). Presented once every three years, the award recognizes the author of an outstanding paper in algebra, combinatorics, or discrete mathematics. Dr. Hough's "Solution of the minimum modulus problem for covering systems," was published in the Annals of Mathematics. Research for this problem was conducted during Dr. Hough's tenure at the University of Cambridge.
1/23/2017 Internationally Renowned Physicist Appointed As Chen Ning Yang - Wei Deng Endowed Chair in Physics and AstronomyProfessor Alexander Zamolodchikov became the inaugural Chen Ning Yang - Wei Deng Endowed Chair in Physics and Astronomy on January 6 at an investiture ceremony in Beijing, China at the global headquarters of Bright Ocean's Corporation. A pioneer in modern theoretical physics and member of the National Academy of Sciences, Prof. Zamolodchikov is known internationally for his contributions to the study of condensed matter physics, conformal field theory and string theory. His impact on the field of physics can be measured by a simple metric: 18,000 -- the number of times his published research has been cited; one of the highest in physics to date.
1/13/2017 Research Shows that Cell Division and Invasion are Separate Actions in Cancer ProcessHallmarks of cancer progression are uncontrolled proliferation (division) of cancer cells and invasive behavior, leading to the spread of tumor cells throughout the body. Now two Stony Brook University cell biologists, David Matus, PhD, and Benjamin Martin, PhD, have discovered that cell division and invasion are mutually exclusive behaviors. For this novel finding, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has awarded the researchers with the 2017 Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award and a two-year grant of $300,000, followed by another renewable grant of $300,000 for an additional two years to further advance their work.
1/9/2017 Caribbean Bats Need 8 Million Years to Recover from Recent Extinction WavesIslands are natural laboratories of evolution and home to unique species of animals and plants. But since the arrival of humans, islands have lost many species. In the Caribbean alone, more than half of the mammal species went extinct after human colonization. Bats are the most diverse group of surviving mammals. Can nature restore the numbers of species on islands to levels that existed before human arrival? How long would it take for nature to regain this lost mammal diversity?
12/29/2016 Stony Brook University's Top Stories in 2016Reflecting on all that 2016 brought our way, Stony Brook University is taking a look back at the top stories that are shaping our future. Along the way, Stony Brook experts played a role in impacting the news of the day as we followed the road to the White House, the medical miracle that gave a young Congolese boy his smile back, global health advances in Madagascar, men's NCAA basketball and more. Join us on this look back at the top stories of 2016.
12/21/2016 NSF Grant Bolsters Geosciences Education Support for Underrepresented StudentsStony Brook University (SBU) has received a three-year grant for more than $400,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to expand the University's decades long commitment to engage underrepresented minorities in the geosciences. The grant will be used to develop the Stony Brook GeoPATH-IMPACT program, which will cultivate STEM education and pathways into the geosciences to increase underrepresented student involvement and experience from high school through community college to 4-year institutions.
12/8/2016 Bahl Center Will Transform Approach to Precision Cancer MedicineUnderstanding the metabolism of cancer at its most complicated cellular levels is an essential approach to advance cancer research and patient outcomes. Add new imaging tools and technology that can map tumors with more precision than ever before and you have a new, one-of-a-kind translational research resource, soon to be located at the Stony Brook University Cancer Center. Stony Brook University held a dedication ceremony for the official opening of the new program on December 1, in its first laboratory space in the Health Sciences tower.
12/6/2016 Study Reveals More Individuals May have "Masked" Hypertension than ThoughtA new study shows that around the clock monitoring of blood pressure during daily activity revealed masked, or undetected, high blood pressure in a significant number of otherwise healthy adults who had normal readings in the clinic. The findings stem from data of 888 participants at Stony Brook University and Columbia University. Led by Joseph E. Schwartz, PhD, of Stony Brook University, the findings will be published in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.
11/30/2016 Licensing Agreement with Codagenix Advances Next Generation Viral VaccinesStony Brook University, through the Research Foundation for the State of New York, has entered into an exclusive licensing agreement with Codagenix, Inc., to commercialize a platform technology to develop a pipeline of live attenuated vaccines against viral infections in people and animals. The technology relies on software to re-design the genomes of potentially harmful viruses to make them safe and effective vaccines. The technology stems from research in the laboratory of Eckard Wimmer, PhD, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology. The lead indication for vaccine development generated is a vaccine against Seasonal Influenza slated for Phase I human clinical trials in 2017.
11/21/2016 Unique Structure of Brain Blood Vessel Amyloid Latest Clue to Alzheimer's Development?Accumulating amounts of amyloid, which is a fragment of a larger protein, in the brain have been associated with the development of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Now a team of neuroscience and biochemistry researchers at Stony Brook University have made a novel discovery that illustrates for the first time the difference between amyloid buildup in brain blood vessels and amyloid buildup around brain neurons. Their findings, which may provide a new path to research on Alzheimer's disease and its cause, will be published November 21 in Nature Communications.
11/16/2016 INCITE Award to Advance Modeling Astrophysical Explosions Via SupercomputingA national research team led by Stony Brook University has been awarded 45 million hours of on one of the world's fastest supercomputers, the Titan Cray XK7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to further their research on explosive astrophysical phenomenon and model these complex occurrences by way of supercomputer-generated simulations. The award, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science through its Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) Program, recognizes national research projects with high potential for accelerating discovery.
10/25/2016 Citizen Scientists Can Now Lend a Hand in Penguin ConservationTracking penguin populations in Antarctica is a critical component of understanding environmental changes in the region. Now, thanks to a collaboration between NASA and Stony Brook University, citizen scientists can lend a hand through the use of a new, interactive, and user-friendly website that tracks Antarctic penguin populations and provides information to scientists.
10/21/2016 Two Physics Faculty Elected APS Fellows for Pioneering ResearchTwo Stony Brook University Professors in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alexander G. Abanov, PhD, and Axel Drees, PhD, have been named American Physical Society (APS) Fellows.
10/11/2016 Robert Harrison Named Chief Architect of DOE National Project to Bolster High-Performance Computing for Energy ApplicationsRobert Harrison, Director of Stony Brook University's Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS), has been named the chief architect of a national effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to improve the scale, performance, accessibility and portability of high-performance computational chemistry. The project will center on improving the universal chemistry code NWChem by redesigning its architecture, with the goal to enhance applications in biomass-based energy production.
10/5/2016 Energy-Saving Superconductor to be Developed at Stony Brook Advanced Energy CenterSupporting clean energy research remains important for increasing new technological applications in the growing marketplace for clean energy. A $1.15 million Department of Energy (DOE) grant to the Brookhaven Technology Group, Inc., (BTG) a business incubator tenant of the Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center (AERTC) at Stony Brook University, will be used to develop a new High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) cable architecture designed to be more cost-effective and better suited for superconducting wire applications than the current high-aspect ratio HTS tape.
9/30/2016 New Research Reveals an Ancient Reptile Had Bizarre Forelimb EvolutionFossil remains from an ancient reptile known as Drepanosaurus reveals unusual skeletal adaptations in the forelimb that scientists have never before recorded in land animals. A Stony Brook University-led national team of paleontologists published their findings in Current Biology. Their findings suggest that more than 200 million years ago reptiles had already evolved specialized modern ecological roles with their strange forelimb adaptation.
9/29/2016 Contrary to Popular Belief - Coca Not the Driving Force of Deforestation, Report RevealsMost of the world's coca--the plant source of cocaine--grows in the Amazon forests of the Andean countries of Colombia, Peru and Bolivia, where many think this illicit crop causes deforestation. However, a team led by Stony Brook University Professor of Ecology and Evolution Liliana M. Dávalos, shows most deforestation isn't caused by coca cultivation. In fact, the study, published in Bioscience, found that deforestation and coca both share a common origin in the implementation of an infrastructure plan from the 1960s to open the Amazon frontier through road construction and development projects.
9/27/2016 NSF $3 Million Grant to IACS Will Fund PhD Student Training in Multiple DisciplinesThe Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS) received a five-year $3M National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) grant to support graduate students from the departments of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Biomedical Informatics, Computer Science, Ecology and Evolution, and the schools of Journalism and Marine and Atmospheric Sciences.
9/16/2016 President Stanley: Funding for Young Researchers is CriticalIn a new video produced by The Science Coalition for its Science 2034 video series, Stony Brook University President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD, addresses the importance of creating new opportunities and additional funding for young scientific investigators, a critical step to pave the way for future scientific breakthroughs.
9/16/2016 New Discovery by Researchers May Lead to Better Understanding and Treatment for a Common Autoinflammatory DiseaseA team of scientists led by Stony Brook University researchers have discovered a new mechanism for a bacterial toxin to inhibit inflammation. Their research shows that a toxin in Yersinia pestis, the bacterial agent of plague, targets and inhibits the protein pyrin. The inherited autoinflammatory disease Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is caused by mutations that lead to continuous activation of pyrin. The findings, published in Cell Host & Microbe, can be used to better understand the genetic origins of FMF and explore new therapies for the disease.
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