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8/22/2017 Research Center Established to Explore the Least Understood and Strongest Force Behind Visible MatterScience can explain only a small portion of the matter that makes up the universe, from the earth we walk on to the stars we see at night. Stony Brook University and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have established the Center for Frontiers of Nuclear Science to help scientists better understand the building blocks of visible matter. The new Center will push the frontiers of knowledge about quarks, gluons and their interactions that form protons, neutrons, and ultimately 99.9 percent of the mass of atoms - the bulk of the visible universe.
8/15/2017 Stony Brook Receives $1 Million for Brain Aging Research from Keck FoundationStony Brook University has received a three-year $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to fund research that uses brain imaging data to understand how the nutrition of brain neurons affects cognition in aging humans. The research could provide a critical first step toward personalized medicine in neurology for aging patients.
8/9/2017 New 13 million-year-old infant skull sheds light on ape ancestryStony Brook, NY, August 9, 2017 - The discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. The find, to be announced in the scientific journal Nature on August 10th, belongs to an infant that lived about 13 million years ago. The research was done by an international team led by Isaiah Nengo of the Stony Brook University-affiliated Turkana Basin Institute, Stony Brook University, and De Anza College, U.S.A.
7/18/2017 ​​Study Reveals Origin of Modern Dog Has a Single Geographic OriginBy analyzing the DNA of two prehistoric dogs from Germany, an international research team led by Krishna R. Veeramah, PhD, Assistant Professor of Ecology & Evolution in the College of Arts & Sciences at Stony Brook University, has determined that their genomes were the probable ancestors of modern European dogs. The finding, to be published in Nature Communications, suggests a single domestication event of modern dogs from a population of gray wolves that occurred between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.
7/13/2017 Award-Winning Research Could Make Wristwatches Smarter Than SmartphonesAward-winning research co-authored by Xiaojun Bi, an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stony Brook University outlines the design, decoding algorithm and implementation for COMPASS, a rotational keyboard that will be used to enter text into smartwatches without the need for a touchscreen.
7/7/2017 Could Concrete Help Solve the Problem of Air Pollution?New research reveals that sulfur dioxide, a major contributor to air pollution, is removed from the air by concrete surfaces. Stony Brook University researcher Alex Orlov, PhD, and colleagues discovered how concrete interacts and eliminates sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Their findings, published in the July edition of the could be a significant step toward the practice of using waste concrete to minimize air pollution.
6/28/2017 Researchers Define Structure of Key Enzyme Implicated in Cancer, Neurological DiseaseA Stony Brook University-led team of researchers has determined the structure of a key enzyme involved with cell growth regulation in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease.
6/21/2017 New Measures of Aging May Show 70 is the New 60Is 70 the new 60? A new Stony Brook University-led study published in PLOS ONE uses new measures of aging with probabilistic projections from the United Nations to scientifically illustrate that one's actual age is not necessarily the best measure of human aging itself, but rather aging should be based on the number of years people are likely to live in a given country in the 21st Century.
6/21/2017 Stony Brook Receives $1 Million to Support Diversity, Inclusion in STEM EducationStony Brook University received a five-year $1 million grant, effective September 1, 2017, from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Inclusive Excellence Initiative for a program that will create faculty learning communities focused on developing inclusive practices in the classroom and laboratory.
6/2/2017 Study links late-night tweeting by NBA players to worse game performancePreliminary data from a new study suggests that NBA players had worse personal statistics in games that followed a late-night tweet between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Players scored on average about 1 point less in games following late-night tweets, and their shooting accuracy dropped 1.7 percentage points compared with their performance in games that did not follow late-night tweeting. After a late-night tweet, players also took fewer shots and had fewer rebounds, steals and blocks.
6/1/2017 Mars Rover Reveals Ancient Lake with Properties Common to Those on EarthNew findings based on NASA's Curiosity rover mission reveal that an ancient lake in Gale Crater on Mars had chemical and physical properties very similar to those common to lakes on Earth. The study, led by Stony Brook University geoscientist Joel Hurowitz, PhD, published in Science, provides evidence that there were multiple environments in the lake that could have supported life.
5/12/2017 Study Reveals Prevalence of Women With Heart Disease Delivering Babies is IncreasingA study of more than 80,000 women with heart disease from 2003 to 2012 reveals that the prevalence of women with heart disease delivering babies increased by 24 percent over that 10-year period. This jump, reported in a Stony Brook University-led study to be published May 15 in the American Journal of Cardiology, may prompt greater awareness of heart disease in women of childbearing age, heighten individual screening of heart disease in pregnant patients, and institute a multidisciplinary approach to labor and delivery.
5/4/2017 Business Incubator at Calverton Names New Associate DirectorChris Kempner, former Executive Director for the Town of Riverhead Community Development Agency (CDA), has been named Associate Director of Stony Brook University's Business Incubator at Calverton, effective May 15, 2017. Selected from a pool of highly qualified candidates, Kempner will oversee the operations of a large R&D facility that provides an optimal environment for the development of emerging business ventures compatible with the unique setting of Long Island's East End for its agricultural, aquaculture, environmental and high-tech industries.
4/27/2017 Professor Long Lu Earns NSF CAREER Award to Develop Solutions in Mobile SecurityLong Lu, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award for his research in rethinking mobile security in today's app-as-a-platform environment. This is Dr. Lu's fourth NSF award and eighth research grant, securing him more than $3 million dollars in research grants. Dr. Lu is the college's second NSF CAREER award recipient for 2017.
4/26/2017 Global Warming Making Oceans More ToxicClimate change is predicted to cause a series of maladies for world oceans including heating up, acidification, and the loss of oxygen. A newly published study published online in the April 24 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences entitled, "Ocean warming since 1982 has expanded the niche of toxic algal blooms in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans," demonstrates that one ocean consequence of climate change that has already occurred is the spread and intensification of toxic algae.
4/20/2017 Two Physicians Recognized for Novel Work in Cancer, Antifungal Research Named to AAPStony Brook University School of Medicine physician-scientists Ute Moll, MD, and Maurizio Del Poeta, MD, have been elected into the prestigious Association of American Physicians (APP). The AAP recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement in the pursuit of medical knowledge and the advancement of clinical science through experimentation and discovery. Both physicians will be inducted as AAP members at the organization's annual meeting in Chicago on April 22.
4/19/2017 US Veterans With Heart Disease and Depression Face Difficulties Affording HealthcareA study of more than 13,000 veterans with heart disease revealed that for those who also had depression, gaining access to and affording healthcare and medications is more difficult than those without depression. Led by Puja Parikh, MD, MPH, an interventional cardiologist at the Stony Brook University Heart Institute, the study findings magnify the importance of assessing issues related to veterans with heart disease and concomitant mental health disease.
4/14/2017 Thomas Allison's "Molecular Movies" Concept Takes Home Stony Brook's $200K Discovery PrizeThomas Allison, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Physics, and a developer of a technology at Stony Brook that will record the movement of molecules that may lead to the development of better high-tech devices, is the winner of the 2017 Discovery Prize. He and three other Stony Brook professors faced off and presented their research to a panel of judges at the competition in the Charles B. Wang Center Theatre at Stony Brook University. As the winner, Dr. Allison receives a $200,000 award.
4/4/2017 Modeling Protein Interactions Critical to Understanding Disease Now Simplified With Computer ServerProteins are the most abundant substance in living cells aside from water, and their interactions with cellular functions are crucial to healthy life. When proteins fall short of their intended function or interact in an unusual way, these disruptions often lead to disease development. By modeling the structure of protein interactions - a process that has been complicated for researchers for years - scientists gain important insight to many diseases. Stony Brook University-led research team through the Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology has created a user-friendly automated computer server that calculates complex computations of modeling protein interactions with a handful of clicks from a home computer. The resource, available researchers around the world, is detailed in a paper published in Nature Protocols.
3/24/2017 Research Suggests a Possible Role for a Storm of "Jumping Genes" in ALSBy inserting an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-linked human gene called TDP-43 into fruit flies, researchers at Stony Brook University and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory discovered a potential role for 'transposons' in the disease. Transposons, which are also called 'jumping genes' because they jump from place to place within DNA, are virus-like entities that fill most of the spaces between genes in an organism. The new research demonstrates that these transposons are no longer effectively inhibited, resulting in a storm of jumping genes, leading to DNA damage accumulation and cell death. The research, published in the current issue of PLOS Genetics, may be a clue to the genetic processes of ALS and the idea that anti-transposon systems may collapse in individuals with ALS.
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