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12/14/2017 Wealth Inequality Increased in Ancient Times with Animal DomesticationAn analysis of 63 archaeological sites across North America, Europe, Asia and Africa by a team of international scientists, including Elizabeth Stone from the Department of Anthropology, revealed that wealth inequality increased over time and was tied to the rise of animal domestication. Published in Nature, the study used house size as a measure of wealth.
12/12/2017 Study Reveals Skin Pigmentation Heredity is Not Straight ForwardMany studies suggest that the genetics of skin pigmentation are simple, as a small number of known genes account for nearly 50 percent of pigment variation. A new study published in Cell counters this scientific view and suggests that while skin pigmentation is nearly 100 percent heritable, it is not a straightforward trait in humans.
12/5/2017 New Reef Aims to Bring Oysters Back to Long IslandThe first oyster reef on Long Island has been installed in Shinnecock Bay by Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) researchers. The installation is a conservation effort to rejuvenate oyster reproduction on Long Island and help improve and maintain clean water.
11/29/2017 New Nursing PhD Program Answers Need for More Nurse ScientistsThe Stony Brook University School of Nursing is launching a PhD in Nursing that will begin in the summer of 2018. The PhD in Nursing Program emphasizes education and training at the highest level in order to develop the next generation of nurse scientists and educators skilled in research methodologies useful in all areas of nursing science to improve the health and well-being of the population.
11/22/2017 Stony Brook University President's Statement on Tax ReformIn response to recent Congressional tax reform negotiations, Stony Brook University President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., said today "As tax reform negotiations continue, I urge leaders in Congress to consider the adverse impacts of proposed provisions on students, research and the State of New York. The provisions proposed would significantly increase costs for graduate students, hurt institutional stability by bringing about a reduction in charitable giving, and result in a decrease in federal funding availability for research and financial aid. In addition, the elimination of the state and local income tax deduction (SALT) would cause a brain drain in New York, resulting in a reduction in state services and support for areas like higher education. Increasing the tax burden on students and universities will make quality higher education less accessible and limit groundbreaking research conducted in the United States.
11/21/2017 Energy Scientist and Pediatric Physician Researchers Named Endowed Chairs at Stony Brook University CeremonyAt an investiture ceremony on the Stony Brook University campus, three new endowed chairs were formally appointed; two leading pediatric clinical research physicians at Stony Brook Children's Hospital and a renowned materials scientist and chemical engineer at the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The three new endowed faculty positions were funded by philanthropic gifts from the Knapp family through the Knapp Swezey Foundation, Island Outreach Foundation, and Jane and William Knapp respectively.
11/15/2017 White Paper Provides Tools to Manage Opioid Use Disorder in PregnancyA new white paper designed to provide New York State healthcare providers and communities with the tools to manage and reduce opioid use disorder in pregnancy has been released by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), District II. David Garry, DO, a Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, and Co-Chair of the ACOG District II Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy Task Force, believes the white paper highlights key solutions that could help women's healthcare providers statewide care for women struggling with addiction and encourage providers to become buprenorphine prescribers.
11/13/2017 Investment Portfolio Theory Helps Scientists Predict Animal Population Growth, Disease SpreadPopulation demography of plants, animals and microbes that cause diseases is central to understanding many problems in ecology, evolution and conservation biology. Scientists have had limited information on collections of living populations to understand and predict what happens when you have many populations spread across vast geographic areas. Most research has focused only on local populations at small scales. A study published in PNAS details a new "landscape portfolio" theory that is based on Markowitz's "portfolio theory" in economics, melded with ecological landscape theory to predict population growth of living things.
11/6/2017 Caribbean Islands Reveal a "Lost World" of Ancient MammalsAlthough filled with tropical life today, the Caribbean islands have been a hotspot of mammal extinction since the end of the last glaciation, some 12,000 years ago. Since people also arrived after that time, it has been impossible to determine whether natural changes or human influence are most responsible for these extinctions. A new review by an international team of scientists, including Stony Brook University Professor Liliana M. Dávalos, reports an analysis of the incredibly diverse "lost world" of Caribbean fossils that includes giant rodents, vampire bats, enigmatic monkeys, ground sloths, shrews and dozens of other ancient mammals. The article, published today in the Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, reveals that the arrival of humans and their subsequent activities throughout the islands was likely the primary cause of the extinction of native mammal species there.
11/1/2017 Using an Electronic Device to Detect Cavities EarlyImagine if dentists could find clear signs of tooth decay long before dental lesions turn into cavities and without using X-rays. A new device cleared for commercialization this month by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a potential tool for dentists to do just that. Developed and patented by researchers in the Division of Translational Oral Biology in the Department of Oral biology and Pathology at Stony Brook University School of Dental Medicine, and licensed to Ortek Therapeutics, Inc., the Electronic Cavity Detection (ECD) System uses electrical conductance to diagnose and monitor enamel lesions on the biting surfaces of molars and premolars.
10/23/2017 Researchers to use Climate Data to Better Predict Marine Distribution in NortheastScientists from Stony Brook University's School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciencesd (SoMAS) will be developing seasonal predictions of fish and marine mammal distributions in the Northeast United States with the goal to enhance protected species management. The research is supported by a $509,573 grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Fisheries Office of Science and Technology, in partnership with NOAA Research's Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections (MAPP) Program. The Northeast U.S. large marine ecosystem is highly productive and supports important commercial and recreational fisheries. It has also experienced some of the highest warming rates in recent decades. Communities in the Northeast have observed many climate-driven changes including shifts in fish distribution for most fish species, as well as changes in the timing of breeding or spawning, seasonal movements, and migrations.
10/12/2017 Year-to-Year Volatility of Penguin Population Requires New Approaches to Track Marine HealthPenguins are noisy, as any visitor to an aquarium knows. Penguins may be noisy in others ways too, according to a new study published in Nature Communications. Scientists have long used Adélie penguin populations to monitor the health of the Southern Ocean and to understand how major factors such as fishing and climate change impact the oceans and the animals that rely on them. Now an extensive analysis of all known data on Adélie penguin populations over the last 35 years has found that only a small fraction of year-to-year changes in Adélie penguin populations can be attributed to measureable factors such as changes in sea ice.
9/13/2017 E-Mental Health Tool May Be Key for Astronauts to Cope with Anxiety, Depression in SpaceA clinical trial of an innovative e-mental health tool led by a Stony Brook University psychiatry professor to help address stress, anxiety and/or depression will begin on September 18. The trial is designed to inform the delivery of mental health treatments for astronauts on long duration space missions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-funded study involves "astronaut-like" individuals and is being developed in conjunction with researchers from the Black Dog Institute in Australia.
8/23/2017 New Computational Model of Chemical Building Blocks May Help Explain the Origins of LifeScientists have yet to understand and explain how life's informational molecules - proteins and DNA and RNA - arose from simpler chemicals when life on earth emerged some four billion years ago. Now a research team from the Stony Brook University Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory believe they have the answer. They developed a computational model explaining how certain molecules fold and bind together to grow longer and more complex, leading from simple chemicals to primitive biological molecules. The findings are reported early online in PNAS.
8/22/2017 Research Center Established to Explore the Least Understood and Strongest Force Behind Visible MatterScience can explain only a small portion of the matter that makes up the universe, from the earth we walk on to the stars we see at night. Stony Brook University and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have established the Center for Frontiers of Nuclear Science to help scientists better understand the building blocks of visible matter. The new Center will push the frontiers of knowledge about quarks, gluons and their interactions that form protons, neutrons, and ultimately 99.9 percent of the mass of atoms - the bulk of the visible universe.
8/15/2017 Stony Brook Receives $1 Million for Brain Aging Research from Keck FoundationStony Brook University has received a three-year $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to fund research that uses brain imaging data to understand how the nutrition of brain neurons affects cognition in aging humans. The research could provide a critical first step toward personalized medicine in neurology for aging patients.
8/9/2017 New 13 million-year-old infant skull sheds light on ape ancestryStony Brook, NY, August 9, 2017 - The discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. The find, to be announced in the scientific journal Nature on August 10th, belongs to an infant that lived about 13 million years ago. The research was done by an international team led by Isaiah Nengo of the Stony Brook University-affiliated Turkana Basin Institute, Stony Brook University, and De Anza College, U.S.A.
7/18/2017 ​​Study Reveals Origin of Modern Dog Has a Single Geographic OriginBy analyzing the DNA of two prehistoric dogs from Germany, an international research team led by Krishna R. Veeramah, PhD, Assistant Professor of Ecology & Evolution in the College of Arts & Sciences at Stony Brook University, has determined that their genomes were the probable ancestors of modern European dogs. The finding, to be published in Nature Communications, suggests a single domestication event of modern dogs from a population of gray wolves that occurred between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.
7/13/2017 Award-Winning Research Could Make Wristwatches Smarter Than SmartphonesAward-winning research co-authored by Xiaojun Bi, an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stony Brook University outlines the design, decoding algorithm and implementation for COMPASS, a rotational keyboard that will be used to enter text into smartwatches without the need for a touchscreen.
7/7/2017 Could Concrete Help Solve the Problem of Air Pollution?New research reveals that sulfur dioxide, a major contributor to air pollution, is removed from the air by concrete surfaces. Stony Brook University researcher Alex Orlov, PhD, and colleagues discovered how concrete interacts and eliminates sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Their findings, published in the July edition of the could be a significant step toward the practice of using waste concrete to minimize air pollution.
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