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5/12/2017 Study Reveals Prevalence of Women With Heart Disease Delivering Babies is IncreasingA study of more than 80,000 women with heart disease from 2003 to 2012 reveals that the prevalence of women with heart disease delivering babies increased by 24 percent over that 10-year period. This jump, reported in a Stony Brook University-led study to be published May 15 in the American Journal of Cardiology, may prompt greater awareness of heart disease in women of childbearing age, heighten individual screening of heart disease in pregnant patients, and institute a multidisciplinary approach to labor and delivery.
5/4/2017 Business Incubator at Calverton Names New Associate DirectorChris Kempner, former Executive Director for the Town of Riverhead Community Development Agency (CDA), has been named Associate Director of Stony Brook University's Business Incubator at Calverton, effective May 15, 2017. Selected from a pool of highly qualified candidates, Kempner will oversee the operations of a large R&D facility that provides an optimal environment for the development of emerging business ventures compatible with the unique setting of Long Island's East End for its agricultural, aquaculture, environmental and high-tech industries.
4/27/2017 Professor Long Lu Earns NSF CAREER Award to Develop Solutions in Mobile SecurityLong Lu, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award for his research in rethinking mobile security in today's app-as-a-platform environment. This is Dr. Lu's fourth NSF award and eighth research grant, securing him more than $3 million dollars in research grants. Dr. Lu is the college's second NSF CAREER award recipient for 2017.
4/26/2017 Global Warming Making Oceans More ToxicClimate change is predicted to cause a series of maladies for world oceans including heating up, acidification, and the loss of oxygen. A newly published study published online in the April 24 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences entitled, "Ocean warming since 1982 has expanded the niche of toxic algal blooms in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans," demonstrates that one ocean consequence of climate change that has already occurred is the spread and intensification of toxic algae.
4/20/2017 Two Physicians Recognized for Novel Work in Cancer, Antifungal Research Named to AAPStony Brook University School of Medicine physician-scientists Ute Moll, MD, and Maurizio Del Poeta, MD, have been elected into the prestigious Association of American Physicians (APP). The AAP recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement in the pursuit of medical knowledge and the advancement of clinical science through experimentation and discovery. Both physicians will be inducted as AAP members at the organization's annual meeting in Chicago on April 22.
4/19/2017 US Veterans With Heart Disease and Depression Face Difficulties Affording HealthcareA study of more than 13,000 veterans with heart disease revealed that for those who also had depression, gaining access to and affording healthcare and medications is more difficult than those without depression. Led by Puja Parikh, MD, MPH, an interventional cardiologist at the Stony Brook University Heart Institute, the study findings magnify the importance of assessing issues related to veterans with heart disease and concomitant mental health disease.
4/14/2017 Thomas Allison's "Molecular Movies" Concept Takes Home Stony Brook's $200K Discovery PrizeThomas Allison, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Physics, and a developer of a technology at Stony Brook that will record the movement of molecules that may lead to the development of better high-tech devices, is the winner of the 2017 Discovery Prize. He and three other Stony Brook professors faced off and presented their research to a panel of judges at the competition in the Charles B. Wang Center Theatre at Stony Brook University. As the winner, Dr. Allison receives a $200,000 award.
4/4/2017 Modeling Protein Interactions Critical to Understanding Disease Now Simplified With Computer ServerProteins are the most abundant substance in living cells aside from water, and their interactions with cellular functions are crucial to healthy life. When proteins fall short of their intended function or interact in an unusual way, these disruptions often lead to disease development. By modeling the structure of protein interactions - a process that has been complicated for researchers for years - scientists gain important insight to many diseases. Stony Brook University-led research team through the Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology has created a user-friendly automated computer server that calculates complex computations of modeling protein interactions with a handful of clicks from a home computer. The resource, available researchers around the world, is detailed in a paper published in Nature Protocols.
3/24/2017 Research Suggests a Possible Role for a Storm of "Jumping Genes" in ALSBy inserting an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-linked human gene called TDP-43 into fruit flies, researchers at Stony Brook University and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory discovered a potential role for 'transposons' in the disease. Transposons, which are also called 'jumping genes' because they jump from place to place within DNA, are virus-like entities that fill most of the spaces between genes in an organism. The new research demonstrates that these transposons are no longer effectively inhibited, resulting in a storm of jumping genes, leading to DNA damage accumulation and cell death. The research, published in the current issue of PLOS Genetics, may be a clue to the genetic processes of ALS and the idea that anti-transposon systems may collapse in individuals with ALS.
3/23/2017 A New Approach to Diagnosing Mental Disorders Could Become an Alternative to DSM-5A consortium of psychiatrists and psychologists from universities around the world, co-led by Stony Brook University, University of Minnesota and University of Notre Dame researchers, has proposed a new approach to diagnosing mental disorders. The approach, articulated in a paper published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, is a classification system of a wide range of psychiatric problems based on scientific evidence, illness symptoms and impaired functioning. The diagnostic system addresses fundamental shortcomings of the fifth edition (2013) of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the clinicians' and researchers' guidebook to mental illnesses.
3/15/2017 First in NY: Stony Brook's New 100 Gigabit Per Second Connection Enables Better Research Through Faster Data TransferStony Brook University became the first higher education institution in New York State to offer a 100 gigabit-per-second (Gbps) connection to the NYSERNet Research and Engineering network through which it also connects to Internet2, revolutionizing the quality, quantity and speed of digital research.
3/10/2017 Study Reveals the English Language Organized ItselfA Stony Brook University-led study of the history and spelling of English suffixes demonstrates that the spelling of English words is more orderly and self-organized that linguistics have previously thought. The finding, details of which are published in the journal Language, is an indication that the self-organization of English occurred even though the language has never been regulated or governed through the centuries.
3/9/2017 Discovery of a new Metabolic Pathway of a Known Lipid has Implications in Cancer, ObesityA collaborative Stony Brook University research team has discovered a novel metabolic pathway of the lipid ceramide, which is involved in cell death. The finding illustrates that ceramide is stored in lipid droplets, a step that may help to uncover processes necessary for cell death and lipid metabolism, and therefore has implications in the development of cancer or obesity. The paper is published in Cell Metabolism.
2/7/2017 Stony Brook Mathematics Professor Receives International RecognitionRobert D. Hough, PhD, Assistant Professor of Mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences at Stony Brook University, was awarded the David P. Robbins Prize by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA). Presented once every three years, the award recognizes the author of an outstanding paper in algebra, combinatorics, or discrete mathematics. Dr. Hough's "Solution of the minimum modulus problem for covering systems," was published in the Annals of Mathematics. Research for this problem was conducted during Dr. Hough's tenure at the University of Cambridge.
1/23/2017 Internationally Renowned Physicist Appointed As Chen Ning Yang - Wei Deng Endowed Chair in Physics and AstronomyProfessor Alexander Zamolodchikov became the inaugural Chen Ning Yang - Wei Deng Endowed Chair in Physics and Astronomy on January 6 at an investiture ceremony in Beijing, China at the global headquarters of Bright Ocean's Corporation. A pioneer in modern theoretical physics and member of the National Academy of Sciences, Prof. Zamolodchikov is known internationally for his contributions to the study of condensed matter physics, conformal field theory and string theory. His impact on the field of physics can be measured by a simple metric: 18,000 -- the number of times his published research has been cited; one of the highest in physics to date.
1/13/2017 Research Shows that Cell Division and Invasion are Separate Actions in Cancer ProcessHallmarks of cancer progression are uncontrolled proliferation (division) of cancer cells and invasive behavior, leading to the spread of tumor cells throughout the body. Now two Stony Brook University cell biologists, David Matus, PhD, and Benjamin Martin, PhD, have discovered that cell division and invasion are mutually exclusive behaviors. For this novel finding, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has awarded the researchers with the 2017 Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award and a two-year grant of $300,000, followed by another renewable grant of $300,000 for an additional two years to further advance their work.
1/9/2017 Caribbean Bats Need 8 Million Years to Recover from Recent Extinction WavesIslands are natural laboratories of evolution and home to unique species of animals and plants. But since the arrival of humans, islands have lost many species. In the Caribbean alone, more than half of the mammal species went extinct after human colonization. Bats are the most diverse group of surviving mammals. Can nature restore the numbers of species on islands to levels that existed before human arrival? How long would it take for nature to regain this lost mammal diversity?
12/29/2016 Stony Brook University's Top Stories in 2016Reflecting on all that 2016 brought our way, Stony Brook University is taking a look back at the top stories that are shaping our future. Along the way, Stony Brook experts played a role in impacting the news of the day as we followed the road to the White House, the medical miracle that gave a young Congolese boy his smile back, global health advances in Madagascar, men's NCAA basketball and more. Join us on this look back at the top stories of 2016.
12/21/2016 NSF Grant Bolsters Geosciences Education Support for Underrepresented StudentsStony Brook University (SBU) has received a three-year grant for more than $400,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to expand the University's decades long commitment to engage underrepresented minorities in the geosciences. The grant will be used to develop the Stony Brook GeoPATH-IMPACT program, which will cultivate STEM education and pathways into the geosciences to increase underrepresented student involvement and experience from high school through community college to 4-year institutions.
12/8/2016 Bahl Center Will Transform Approach to Precision Cancer MedicineUnderstanding the metabolism of cancer at its most complicated cellular levels is an essential approach to advance cancer research and patient outcomes. Add new imaging tools and technology that can map tumors with more precision than ever before and you have a new, one-of-a-kind translational research resource, soon to be located at the Stony Brook University Cancer Center. Stony Brook University held a dedication ceremony for the official opening of the new program on December 1, in its first laboratory space in the Health Sciences tower.
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